Usability testing on a budget (by J Meadow)

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This presentation explains how to run your own usability test sessions, within a limited budget and timeframe.

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  • first slide
  • March 2011 was 30th anniversary of the ZX81 next year 30th anniversary of the ZX Spectrum
  • the following questions will be covered during this presentation
  • testing with real users... in this instance with real users of your website can use wireframes, page mockups, site being developed or current site
  • other ways to learn more about your users user focus groups & card sorting are done with real users > user research - learn about your users; their behaviour, attitudes and needs > user focus groups - meet with a group of users > personas - communicate findings from user research > card sorting - meet with users 1-on-1 to improve site structure > site statistics - understand who is using your site and how they use it
  • so, when’s best to start usability testing
  • 3 equal parts, could complete within 2 to 3 days Day 1: Plan tests, find & recruit testers Day 2: Test 6 users for about 1 hour each Day 3: Analyse findings and write up
  • tasks are more natural than direct questions or instructions - You're at a friend's house in Island Bay. When is the next bus back to town? - “ A drain on your street has burst and you need to report it urgently - find the telephone number ” better than Find the Contact Us section of the site
  • It takes only five users to uncover 80 percent of high-level usability problems source: Yakob Nielsen
  • don’t just ask anyone off the street, unless they match your target audience
  • Identify 5 user definable categories, some relating specifically to your site e.g. age, locality, life stage, income
  • add details of first possible candidate
  • add more details as you find more potential candidates now notice all in “outer suburb”, so need to find “central” and “close suburb” candidates
  • keep going, till have 8 participants balanced across all categories
  • doesn’t have to be exact, just the best you can get across all categories
  • and add another for good luck (in case someone drops out)
  • then complete contact details - usually email AND phone contact
  • and finally scheduled time and date of test sessions allow approx 40 minutes per session
  • Pre-check: - doesn't need to be perfect or finished - just make sure tasks are do-able and not dead-ends. Invite team members: - useful for them to see and learn from the session - limit to one per session, don’t overwhelm the test participant Setup the test room: - preferable to have 2 staff members present, facilitator (you) + note taker (colleague)
  • Welcome participants and make them feel at ease Get them familiar with the environment Outline what they will be doing and how long this will take: - introductions (5 minutes) - work through test tasks (20 minutes) - questions and answers (5 minutes)
  • If the participant is silent for a while, ask What are you thinking? If the participant says “hmmm” or “oops” ask What questions do you have right now? If the participant stops because they’re stuck or think they’re done: summarise what you saw them do ask what they would do next Don’t be afraid to move on if something is taking too long
  • User’s are only too happy to talk with you when the testing is over! sometimes is when you get the best feedback
  • Usability testing on a budget (by J Meadow)

    1. 1. Usability testing on a budget <ul><li>by Julian Meadow </li></ul>
    2. 4. Questions <ul><li>What is web usability testing? </li></ul><ul><li>When to conduct usability tests? </li></ul><ul><li>How many users to test with? </li></ul><ul><li>How to select your test users? </li></ul><ul><li>How to plan your tests sessions? </li></ul><ul><li>How many test sessions to run? </li></ul><ul><li>Who should attend? </li></ul><ul><li>How to conduct the test sessions? </li></ul>
    3. 5. What is usability testing? <ul><li>Web usability testing is a technique </li></ul><ul><li>for ensuring the users of your website </li></ul><ul><li>can carry out their intended tasks </li></ul><ul><li>efficiently, effectively and satisfactorily . </li></ul><ul><li>Web usability testing helps you understand </li></ul><ul><li>your audience’s needs and, in return, </li></ul><ul><li>produce more effective websites. </li></ul>
    4. 6. Other techniques to understand your users understand your users <ul><li>user research </li></ul><ul><li>user focus groups </li></ul><ul><li>personas </li></ul><ul><li>card sorting </li></ul><ul><li>site statistics </li></ul>
    5. 7. When to test? <ul><li>In a perfect world... the sooner the better </li></ul><ul><li>Start during initial development </li></ul><ul><li>Continue through the life of your site </li></ul><ul><li>Useful when making changes </li></ul><ul><li>Make iterative </li></ul>
    6. 8. Usability testing <ul><li>Prepare </li></ul>1 2 3 Conduct Review
    7. 9. <ul><li>Prepare </li></ul>1 <ul><li>Determine what needs testing </li></ul><ul><li>Develop user tasks to test </li></ul><ul><li>Recruit and schedule users </li></ul>
    8. 10. How many test users? <ul><li>one test session is better than none </li></ul><ul><li>6 to 8 recommended to uncover the majority of issues </li></ul><ul><li>usually aim to recruit 9, in case someone backs-out </li></ul>
    9. 11. How to select test users? <ul><li>Important to get recruitment right </li></ul><ul><li>Represent your target audience </li></ul><ul><li>Ask colleagues, friends, family, acquaintances, etc </li></ul><ul><li>Complete usability testing matrix </li></ul>
    10. 12. Usability testing matrix
    11. 13. Usability testing matrix name sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited
    12. 14. Usability testing matrix name sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited Julia H female under 25 outer suburb student standard Richard A male over 45 outer suburb worker standard
    13. 15. Usability testing matrix name sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited Julia H female under 25 outer suburb student standard Richard A male over 45 outer suburb worker standard Ruth C female 25 to 45 central worker advanced Paul W male over 45 central retired standard
    14. 16. Usability testing matrix name sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited Julia H female under 25 outer suburb student standard Richard A male over 45 outer suburb worker standard Ruth C female 25 to 45 central worker advanced Paul W male over 45 central retired standard Jen P female over 45 outer suburb worker advanced Brendan C male 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard Ryan M male 25 to 45 central worker limited
    15. 17. Usability testing matrix name sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited Julia H female under 25 outer suburb student standard Richard A male over 45 outer suburb worker standard Ruth C female 25 to 45 central worker advanced Paul W male over 45 central retired standard Jen P female over 45 outer suburb worker advanced Brendan C male 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard Ryan M male 25 to 45 central worker limited Hilary J female 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard
    16. 18. Usability testing matrix name contact details sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M [email_address] female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited Julia H [email_address] female under 25 outer suburb student standard Richard A [email_address] male over 45 outer suburb worker standard Ruth C [email_address] female 25 to 45 central worker advanced Paul W [email_address] male over 45 central retired standard Jen P [email_address] female over 45 outer suburb worker advanced Brendan C [email_address] male 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard Ryan M [email_address] male 25 to 45 central worker limited Hilary J [email_address] female 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard
    17. 19. Usability testing matrix name contact details when sex 50% male, 50% female age 33% under 25, 33% 25 to 45, 33% over 45 locality 33% central, 33% close suburb, 33% outer suburb life stage 33% student, 33% worker, 33% retired technical ability 33% limited, 33% standard, 33% advanced Robyn M [email_address] pm Tues 14th female 25 to 45 outer suburb student limited Julia H [email_address] pm Tues 14th female under 25 outer suburb student standard Richard A [email_address] pm Tues 14th male over 45 outer suburb worker standard Ruth C [email_address] 10:00 Wed 15th female 25 to 45 central worker advanced Paul W [email_address] 12:45 Wed 15th male over 45 central retired standard Jen P [email_address] 3:00 Wed 15th female over 45 outer suburb worker advanced Brendan C [email_address] 5:15 Wed 15th male 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard Ryan M [email_address] 6:00 Wed 15th male 25 to 45 central worker limited Hilary J [email_address] female 25 to 45 close suburb worker standard
    18. 20. <ul><li>Prepare </li></ul>1 <ul><li>Determine what needs testing </li></ul><ul><li>Develop user tasks to test </li></ul><ul><li>Recruit and schedule users </li></ul><ul><li>Final test preparation </li></ul><ul><li>pre-check all scenarios </li></ul><ul><li>invite team members </li></ul><ul><li>setup the room </li></ul>
    19. 30. <ul><li>Welcome participants </li></ul><ul><li>Get them familiar </li></ul><ul><li>Outline what they’ll be doing </li></ul>Conduct <ul><li>Introductions (5 mins) </li></ul><ul><li>Work through tasks (20 mins) </li></ul><ul><li>Questions and answers (5 mins) </li></ul>2
    20. 31. <ul><li>Remind participants you’re not testing them, you’re testing the site </li></ul><ul><li>Ask them to think out loud </li></ul><ul><li>Remember not to lead to the answers </li></ul><ul><li>Only give one task at a time </li></ul>2 Conduct - techniques
    21. 32. <ul><li>Allow a few minutes for informal discussion at the end </li></ul><ul><li>Ask what they liked and disliked </li></ul><ul><li>Ask if anything was confusing or frustrating </li></ul><ul><li>Ask if they have any suggestions for improvements </li></ul>2 Conduct - after testing
    22. 33. <ul><li>Review </li></ul><ul><li>Write-up your session notes </li></ul><ul><li>Sort into order, highlighting issues </li></ul><ul><li>Analyse and review with team </li></ul><ul><li>Add recommendations, with priorities </li></ul>1st priority - has to be fixed 2nd priority - good to fix 3rd priority - needs further review 3
    23. 36. Questions?
    24. 37. Thank you j@ silverstripe.com

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