Dentists in Silver Spring MD: The Ten Most Common Toothbrushing Mistakes, PART 3

168 views

Published on

This three-part article series explains the 10 mistakes people commonly make when brushing their teeth or choosing the appropriate healthcare appliances.

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
168
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Dentists in Silver Spring MD: The Ten Most Common Toothbrushing Mistakes, PART 3

  1. 1. DentistsDentistsDentistsDentists inininin SilverSilverSilverSilver SpringSpringSpringSpring MD:MD:MD:MD: TheTheTheThe TenTenTenTen MostMostMostMost CommonCommonCommonCommon ToothbrushingToothbrushingToothbrushingToothbrushing Mistakes,Mistakes,Mistakes,Mistakes, PARTPARTPARTPART 3333 ThisThisThisThis three-partthree-partthree-partthree-part articlearticlearticlearticle seriesseriesseriesseries explainsexplainsexplainsexplains thethethethe 10101010 mistakesmistakesmistakesmistakes peoplepeoplepeoplepeople commonlycommonlycommonlycommonly makemakemakemake whenwhenwhenwhen brushingbrushingbrushingbrushing theirtheirtheirtheir teethteethteethteeth orororor choosingchoosingchoosingchoosing thethethethe appropriateappropriateappropriateappropriate healthcarehealthcarehealthcarehealthcare appliances.appliances.appliances.appliances. Welcome to the final installment of our three-part article series on the 10 most common toothbrushing mistakes patients tend to make. In our previous two articles, we spoke to dentistsdentistsdentistsdentists inininin SilverSilverSilverSilver SpringSpringSpringSpring MDMDMDMD who cautioned us against the following common brushing errors: � Choosing the wrong size toothbrush, � Using hard-bristled toothbrushes, � Not brushing for long enough (two minutes is the recommended time) � Not brushing frequently enough (three times a day is optimal) � Brushing too hard, � Brushing too frequently, � Using the wrong technique � Starting at the same point every time, � Neglecting the inner tooth surfaces. Without further ado, let’s take a look at the three final common toothbrushing errors! CommonCommonCommonCommon MistakeMistakeMistakeMistake #### 8:8:8:8: NotNotNotNot RinsingRinsingRinsingRinsing YourYourYourYour MouthMouthMouthMouth AfterwardsAfterwardsAfterwardsAfterwards “You should rinse your toothbrush thoroughly after every use or else you risk leaving bacteria and food debris on the bristles,” says a Silver Spring cosmetic dentist. “Then, the next time you
  2. 2. use your toothbrush, you can put all that bacteria back in your mouth. This is not to mention that old, dried toothpaste. Rinse thoroughly and always replace your toothbrush after a bout of flu or any other viral infection.” CommonCommonCommonCommon MistakeMistakeMistakeMistake #### 9:9:9:9: NotNotNotNot GivingGivingGivingGiving YourYourYourYour ToothbrushToothbrushToothbrushToothbrush aaaa ChanceChanceChanceChance totototo DryDryDryDry “You should absolutely never leave your toothbrush lying around in a puddle of moisture,” warn dentists in Silver Spring MD. “Your toothbrush should be left somewhere it is able to dry out in between uses. A moist toothbrush provides bacteria with an excellent environment in which to proliferate.” “This is why those toothbrush caps are actually a bad idea, even though they are supposed to keep your brush hygienic. They don’t allow evaporation to take place, which keeps the bristles moist, thus encouraging bacterial activity. Once you’re done with your toothbrush, shake off any excess water and leave it in an aired cabinet, preferably in a glass standing up. This will give it the best possible chance of drying, while being sheltered from any biofilm that might settle on it during the course of the day.” CommonCommonCommonCommon MistakeMistakeMistakeMistake #### 10:10:10:10: HoldingHoldingHoldingHolding OntoOntoOntoOnto anananan OldOldOldOld ToothbrushToothbrushToothbrushToothbrush “You should be changing your toothbrush every three to four months, or at least that’s what the American Dental Association recommends,” say SilverSilverSilverSilver SpringSpringSpringSpring cosmeticcosmeticcosmeticcosmetic dentistsdentistsdentistsdentists. “Actually, the bristles of your toothbrush will provide you with a more adequate understanding of when it’s time to go shopping again! In order to be most effective in keeping your teeth, gums and tongue clean, the bristles of your toothbrush should be straight. Once they start bending and becoming frayed, you should get a new toothbrush.” “If your toothbrushes tend to become frayed really quickly, you are probably brushing too hard and should try to ease up on the pressure. Your toothbrushes (and your teeth) will last longer,” say dentists in Silver Spring MD. “Some newer, nifty brands come with color indicators that will tell you when it’s time to get a new brush.” AAAA FinalFinalFinalFinal NoteNoteNoteNote Frequent and thorough brushing is integral to maintaining a high standard of oral health and hygiene. By avoiding the 10 common toothbrushing mistakes and taking the advice laid out in this three-part article series, you can get the very most out of the time you spend caring for your teeth. And healthy teeth make a beautiful smile!

×