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Naming Architecture: A Blueprint for Portfolio Simplicity

Jeff Lapatine (strategy director, brand development) delves into naming and nomenclature architecture, and how by deploying simple, easy to codify concepts, you can unlock the potential of your portfolio through the power of simplicity.

Naming Architecture: A Blueprint for Portfolio Simplicity

  1. 1. Naming architecture A blueprint for portfolio simplicity June 23, 2015
  2. 2. The Simplicity Company Siegel+Gale is a global strategic branding firm committed to building world-class brands through elegantly simple, unexpectedly fresh brand strategies, stories and experiences. + Research + Strategy + Naming + Brand Architecture + Brand Communication + Design + Simplification* + Digital + Employee Engagement + Brand Activation New York • London • Shanghai • Los Angeles • Riyadh • San Francisco *Simplification is the strategic process of transforming communications and interactions into clear, useful, customer-focused experiences.
  3. 3. + improves margin + increases loyalty + drives stock performance Simplicity pays simplicityindex.com The GBSI is our yearly ranking of the world’s most simple brands as delivered through customer experiences.
  4. 4. Simple can be harder than complex. You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But once you get there, you can move mountains. Steve Jobs
  5. 5. What is naming architecture, and how does it lead to portfolio simplicity?
  6. 6. It’s how an entity organizes and guides the naming of its capabilities and offerings, so that customers and others can readily understand and navigate what’s being offered.
  7. 7. It may involve creating some new names But in fact, it generally involves reducing the number of proprietary names in a portfolio. It’s about creating consistent naming hierarchies and constructs rather than creating specific new names. < = >
  8. 8. It’s often referred to, but isn’t exactly the same as, brand architecture—which primarily deals with the role of a parent brand or masterbrand and secondary brands in a portfolio.
  9. 9. The new CVS Health brand architecture is establishing the relationship of its four key businesses and their products to the parent
  10. 10. Business Units Corporate brand Pharmacy Advisor® Acquired sub-brands Specialty Connect™ Philanthropy Partnerships & joint ventures Sponsorships Internal FastStart® CustomCare® Programs UR/URPlus Pharmacy Mgmt. Health Savings Pass® Please note: the above is a representative sample of portfolio offerings, not a comprehensive current state map. Services, products, programs Business unit campaigns Cross-business unit offerings Personalized Weight Loss Program Stop smoking with Start to Stop™ CareTeam CarePlus™ myWeeklyAd myCVS On the Go Pharmacy Home™ myCVSPharmacy® CVS/pharmacy Health Savings Pass Extracare beautyclub ReadyFill® “Win with Health plans” But the naming architecture focuses on which types of names work best in the portfolio
  11. 11. This distinction is particularly important in defining and scoping a branding assignment
  12. 12. Also, naming architecture may be related to, but isn’t primarily about, corporate or visual identity
  13. 13. And lastly, it’s not about business organization… but it could impact how a business is structured going forward
  14. 14. Naming architecture typically is needed when: A new or combined entity— needs to communicate its capabilities and offerings. An existing entity— lacks naming conventions and procedures, or they have become inconsistent over time. A product/service portfolio— has become burdened with proprietary brand names, making it difficult to understand, complex to navigate and expensive to maintain.
  15. 15. The four elements of naming architecture 1. Portfolio modeling 2. Name selection criteria 3. Naming frameworks 4. Internal guidance
  16. 16. 1. Portfolio modeling Map and analyze the current portfolio names as a starting point. Develop alternative models for structuring the portfolio and decide where different types of product names fit.
  17. 17. 2. Name selection criteria Determine the criteria for selecting the right types of names for the range of offerings within the portfolio. ™ ® SM
  18. 18. There basically are 4 types of names Product names fall somewhere on a spectrum between generic and arbitrary. Generic Descriptive Suggestive Arbitrary Industry-standard terminology, usually the common or class name for the goods or services Real, recognizable words that describe a product’s function or form; explains what a product is or does Recognizable words that suggest a product’s attributes or benefits; evokes an attitude Something new; unusual or invented words that acquire meaning over time Mobile Phone Digital Video Recorder AT&T Wireless IBM Cloud Marketplace D&B Data Exchange Loan & Deposit Confirmations Sprint IBM Spectrum Storage SmartBook Intuit Navigator Verizon Segway Kodak Bluetooth
  19. 19. The right type of name should balance strategic, communications and trademark considerations Can’t trademark Often longer names Requires less marketing support Less distinctive Strong trademark Often shorter names Requires greater marketing support More distinctive Generic Descriptive Suggestive Arbitrary Industry-standard terminology, usually the common or class name for the goods or services Real, recognizable words that describe a product’s function or form; explains what a product is or does Recognizable words that suggest a product’s attributes or benefits; evokes an attitude Something new; unusual or invented words that acquire meaning over time Mobile Phone Digital Video Recorder AT&T Wireless IBM Cloud Marketplace D&B Data Exchange Loan & Deposit Confirmations Sprint IBM Spectrum Storage SmartBook Intuit Navigator Verizon Segway Kodak Bluetooth
  20. 20. It gets harder and harder to find trademarks that balance clarity and distinctiveness
  21. 21. 3. Naming frameworks Develop logical and consistent vertical hierarchies and horizontal constructs to put the parts of a name together for greater clarity and consistency.
  22. 22. Two parts to frameworks 1. The overall structure How do you define the different categories and levels? How are the products positioned in relation to each other? 1: Product suite Products that work together or are linked in a significant way Identifies a shared industry, audience, technology or platform 2: The product itself Individual methodologies, technologies, solutions and services Describes a function, result or benefit 3: Module to the product Core or optional component delivered through a product; it does not stand alone Describes a feature or functionality
  23. 23. Two parts to frameworks 2. Naming constructs • How do you order each product name based on the architecture? • What are the fixed and optional elements that work together? • How do you use the name in communications? For example:
  24. 24. 4. Internal guidance Develop internal governance procedures, decision trees, guidelines and other tools to aid decision-making and compliance. Do you need a new name? No you don’t No new name
  25. 25. Some case studies demonstrating typical situations and processes
  26. 26. 1. Portfolio modeling
  27. 27. The challenge: It may not be clear from our current naming architecture, but we do a lot more than sell health insurance policies.
  28. 28. Aetna’s challenges A changing healthcare environment (globalization, retailization, digitization and cost containment) demanded a fresh look at our business and brand. Competitors were diversifying their businesses, expanding into new markets and placing an aggressive focus on consumers. Against this backdrop, Aetna’s position was becoming undifferentiated, and its brand strength was lagging.
  29. 29. Objectives Expand and clarify Aetna’s traditional insurance and financial capabilities with: • A range of offerings that focus on wellness programs and tools. • New offerings in the areas of medical intelligence and care optimization (including expanding accountable care solution capabilities)
  30. 30. The solution: Create a new naming architecture model for organizing and clearly representing our expanded capabilities and offerings.
  31. 31. Starting point: name creation without a focus
  32. 32. We explored alternative portfolio models Improve Health Protect Finances Insure Health Optimize Performance Health & Wellness Technology & Intelligence Plans & Benefits Consulting & Administration Motivation Inspiration Protection Optimization Healthier Living Financial Well-Being Accessible Health Care Intelligent Solutions
  33. 33. Criteria for selecting an Aetna model Business objectives Which best supports the new brand story? Work sessions and validation research Which best resonates with internal and external audiences? Regulatory restrictions Can’t overpromise
  34. 34. Selected model based on criteria and research Improve Health Protect Finances Make Healthcare Accessible Optimize Performance Health & Wellness Technology & Intelligence Plans & Benefits Consulting & Administration Motivation Inspiration Protection Optimization Healthier Living Financial Well-Being Quality Health Plans & Benefits Intelligent Solutions
  35. 35. Organizing principles defined Healthier Living Financial Well-Being Quality Health Plans & Benefits Intelligent Solutions Masterbrand Organizing Principle The plans and benefits you need to help safeguard your health The resources needed for individuals and communities to thrive The plans and benefits to ensure your family’s financial future The expertise you need to improve productivity and healthcare’s future
  36. 36. Part of a new brand story
  37. 37. Bringing the organizing principles to market
  38. 38. Benefits of portfolio modeling for Aetna • Better understanding of Aetna’s broader capabilities and offerings • Stronger competitive positioning in a changing healthcare environment • Integration of subsidiaries, acquisitions and partnerships into a cohesive brand story
  39. 39. 2. Name selection criteria ™ ® SM
  40. 40. The challenge: Our key brands are getting obscured, our customers are getting confused and our resources are getting stretched.
  41. 41. The solution: Implement a company-wide product name selection strategy for connecting the right type of name to the right offering.
  42. 42. Mobile Devices • C139 • MOTO RAZR U6 • MOTO Q • Talkabout FV 550A • Audex Cargo Jacket • M25 Digital Audio Player Networks and Enterprise • MOTOwi4 WiMAX • Canopy ODFM Point-to-Point • MOTOBRIDGE G1 WiAP 110 • MEA for Intelligent Transportation System Inconsistent naming complicated both consumer and business portfolios
  43. 43. And Moto was going wild!!!
  44. 44. We mapped to provide the blueprint for simplicity
  45. 45. Game-changing • Is this a game-changing offer, upon which the success of Motorola depends? Powerful marketing support • Will it receive sustained marketing support over time? We established strict criteria for creating new proprietary names Substantial revenue potential • Does it represent substantial current or future revenues? Unique value proposition • Can any existing strategic sub-brand be used/extended to successfully position this
  46. 46. A decision tree provided the way forward Generic Descriptive Suggestive Arbitrary Industry-standard terminology, usually the common or class name for the goods or services Real, recognizable words that describe a product’s function or form; explains what a product is or does Recognizable words that suggest a product’s attributes or benefits; evokes an attitude Something new; unusual or invented words that acquire meaning over time
  47. 47. NameQuest, an interactive tool, automated the decision tree
  48. 48. Benefits of name selection criteria for Motorola • Focused marketing resources behind the company’s key brands • Restricted the use of unnecessary new brand names • Simplified use to encourage consistent implementation • Provided a consistent mind-set across the enterprise
  49. 49. 3. Naming frameworks
  50. 50. The challenge: We can own the leadership position in cancer care, research and education. But our naming practices don’t support “one MSK.”
  51. 51. The solution: Create a structure for naming our capabilities and services in a more consistent way that reinforces the Memorial Sloan Kettering brand.
  52. 52. Building blocks for consistent naming constructs Formal Name Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Shorthand Memorial Sloan Kettering or MSK Donor Name Evelyn H. Lauder, Elmer and Mamdouha Bobst, John and Maxine Bendheim, Sidney Kimmel, Clair Tow, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Specialty/ Sub-specialty ―or― Type of Program/ Service Pediatric Prostate and Urological, Comparative Medicine, Cell Biology, Comparative Medicine and Pathology Outpatient, Infusion services, Disease management program, HOPP Capability Cancer Care, Research, Education Type of Facility Laboratory, Building, Pavilion Location Commack, Basking Ridge, Sleepy Hollow
  53. 53. We applied consistent framework definitions Hospital: Whenever possible, this term should be reserved for a main inpatient facility Memorial Hospital Center: Freestanding facility or facility within a building for patient care or research Bendheim Integrative Medicine Center; Zuckerman Research Center Pavilions, units: Areas within a building that may cover a specific disease state or area of excellence Rockefeller Outpatient Pavilion; Laura Rosenberg Pediatric Observation Unit
  54. 54. Naming frameworks for facilities
  55. 55. Naming frameworks applied to regional centers
  56. 56. Naming frameworks applied to internal units
  57. 57. Benefits of name selection criteria for MSK • Improved clarity and consistency in applying medical terminology • Improved navigation and signage
  58. 58. 4. Internal guidance Do you need a new name? No you don’t No new name
  59. 59. The challenge: We strive to talk plainly, but our investment names are not always intuitive.
  60. 60. The solution: Create guidelines and a governance process to support the internal organization.
  61. 61. Naming governance Submit a Trademark Search and Request Form • Identify client need • Form product concept As part of the product development process • Determine unique attributes of this offer • Determine positioning Prepare positioning concept brief Present positioning brief to Advisory Committee Approved? Yes No Prepare for brainstorming session to develop name Note: If positioning research among clients is planned, it may be appropriate to include the name options in the research in order to ensure that the chosen name reinforces both the brand and offering positioning. Hold brainstorming session Finalize recommendation Present positioning brief with proposed name to Advisory committee No Secure legal rights, if required Consult Legal for trademark process Proceed with product development Yes Present 1 to 3 names to business and other stakeholders Get Legal sign-off Approved?
  62. 62. Does naming architecture save money? • This is difficult to quantify, however, simplified internal processes and a reduction in the number of unnecessary trademarks should result in cost-savings over time.
  63. 63. Final takeaways • Intent is easy...follow through is hard • Senior level commitment is essential • Guidelines that are too rigid will fail • Does it save money? Hard to assess, but logically it must
  64. 64. Questions?
  65. 65. Thank you. @siegelgale Today’s presenters: Jeff Lapatine Strategy Director jlapatine@siegelgale.com Jessica Kirk, Vice President jkirk@siegelgale.com Related links: www.siegelgale.com

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