The brook

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The brook

  1. 1. Siddhi Kulkarni
  2. 2. The PoetSiddhi Kulkarni
  3. 3. • Alfred Tennyson is a English poet, often regarded as the chief representative of the Victorian age in poetry.Siddhi Kulkarni
  4. 4. • Alfred, Lord Tennyson was born on August 5, 1809 in Somersby, Lincolnshire. Alfred began to write poetry at an early age in the style of Lord Byron. After spending four years in school he was tutored at home. Tennyson then studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he joined the literary club The Apostles and met Arthur Hallam, who became his closest friend. TennysonSiddhi Kulkarni published Poems, Chiefly Lyrical , in
  5. 5. • His book, “ Poems “(1833), received unfavorable reviews, and Tennyson ceased to publish for nearly ten years. Hallam died suddenly on the same year which was a heavy blow to Tennyson. He began to write "In Memoriam", an elegy for his lost friend - the work took seventeen years. "The Lady of Shalott", "The Lotus- eaters" "Morte dArthur" and "Ulysses" appeared inSiddhi Kulkarni 1842 in the two-volume
  6. 6. After marrying Emily Sellwood, the couple settled in Farringford in 1853. From there the family moved in 1869 to Aldworth, Surrey. During these laterSiddhi Kulkarni years he produced
  7. 7. Partial list of works – The Dying Swan – The Kraken – Mariana – Lady Clara Vere de Vere – The Lotos-Eaters – The Lady of Shalott – The Palace of Art – St. Simeon Stylites – Locksley Hall – Tithonus – Vision of Sin – The Two Voices – Ulysses – The Princess – Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal – Tears, Idle Tears – Maud – The Charge of the Light – Enoch Arden – The Brook Siddhi Kulkarni
  8. 8. Partial list of works • Flower in the crannied wall • The Window • Harold • Idylls of the King) • Locksley Hall Sixty Years After • Crossing the Bar • The Foresters • Kapiolani • Maud • The Charge of the Light • Enoch Arden • The Brook • Flower in the crannied wall • The Window • Harold • Idylls of the King) • Locksley Hall Sixty Years After • Crossing the Bar • The Foresters • Kapiolani Siddhi Kulkarni
  9. 9. • Tennyson died at Aldwort on October 6, 1892 and was buried in the PoetsSiddhi Kulkarni Corner in
  10. 10. ThePoem Siddhi Kulkarni
  11. 11. Summary• The poet has realistically drawn a parallelism between the journey of the brook with the life of a man. The poet says, as in the childhood the a child is very agile, energetic and lively, like that, only the brook in the beginning stage of its life is very powerful, enhancing and it keeps on flowing with a great rush and enthusiasm through out its life. It falls from great heights and menders around the wavy path, and when it approaches on plain it becomes very slow and continues to flow eternally. Like the brook, a man toward the end of his life becomes slow in his moves and ultimately dies and also emerges with its final destination but it never ends to flow........ Siddhi Kulkarni
  12. 12. POETIC DEVICES:• ALLITERATION: sudden sally, Half a hundred, skimming swallows, golden gravel, willow-weeds, fairy foreland, field and fallow• ONOMATOPOEIA: bicker, babble, chatter, murmur• RHYMING SCHEME: abab• REFRAIN: For men may come and may go, but I go on forever.• REPETITION: And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling. I chatter, chatter• PERSONIFICATION: The brook has been personified• SYMBOL: Fish=source of life, forget-me-nots=eternal love• Siddhi Kulkarni
  13. 13. I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make a sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley.Siddhi Kulkarni
  14. 14. By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorpes, a little town, And half a hundred bridges. Siddhi Kulkarni
  15. 15. Till last by Philips farm I flow To join the brimming river,For men may come and men may go,But I go on for ever. Siddhi Kulkarni
  16. 16. I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles,I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. Siddhi Kulkarni
  17. 17. With many a curve my banks I fretBy many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland setWith willow-weed and mallow. Siddhi Kulkarni
  18. 18. I chatter, chatter, as I flowTo join the brimming river,For men may come and men may go,But I go on for ever. Siddhi Kulkarni
  19. 19. I wind about, and in and out,With here a blossom sailing,And here and there a lusty trout,And here and there a grayling, Siddhi Kulkarni
  20. 20. And here and there a foamy flakeUpon me, as I travelWith many a silvery waterbreakAbove the golden gravel, Siddhi Kulkarni
  21. 21. And draw them all along, and flowTo join the brimming riverFor men may come and men may go,But I go on for ever. Siddhi Kulkarni
  22. 22. I steal by lawns and grassy plots,I slide by hazel covers;I move the sweet forget-me-notsThat grow for happy lovers. Siddhi Kulkarni
  23. 23. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,Among my skimming swallows;I make the netted sunbeam danceAgainst my sandy shallows. Siddhi Kulkarni
  24. 24. I murmur under moon and starsIn brambly wildernesses;I linger by my shingly bars;I loiter round my cresses; Siddhi Kulkarni
  25. 25. And out again I curve and flowTo join the brimming river,For men may come and men may go,But I go on for ever. Siddhi Kulkarni
  26. 26. Siddhi Kulkarni

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