Towards a healthy world?Public Private Partnership in sustainablefoodchains: Brussels, April 14, 2011
Index1. We face growing food problems              p. 4    Towards a healthy world?                                       ...
IntroductionDrs. Sibolt MulderSenior consultant: on building public support forgovernmental policiesRelevant projects:Dutc...
We face growing food problemsTowards a healthy world?
Growing health problems55% of the Dutch men and 45% of the women between 20-70 years are overweightIn the last 25 years th...
Growing environmental problems with food-production(Note: Holland is big: the worlds second exporter of agricultural produ...
Damage to biodiversity 1700 - 2050                                                                     7                  ...
Food industry is under fire. How to react? 1962                     1965                 2004                  2011 ?Other...
Dutch governmental food production policy priorities  In 15 years the food patterns of the current ‘innovators’ among the ...
Dutch governmental food consumption policy priorities  Create an environment reducing the development of obesity  Promote ...
Changing people: a little theoryTowards a healthy world?
Behaviour is mainly determined by our environment                             Demografy               Technology          ...
Prochaska: psychological model of phases in changeSix stages of change                                                   C...
E. Rogers: sociological model of segments in adopting change % of population    Innovators           Early Adopters       ...
Our various sustainability surveys show that a minoritywants a choice but the majority prefers convenience% of population ...
Building change, step by step, segment by segment% of population 1. Public and political 2. Introducing behaviour-options ...
Working together in a public/private partnership?% of population 1. Public and political 2. Introducing behaviour-options ...
During the phases of change-strategy the focus changes,based on the curves of attitude and behaviour                      ...
Food = Culture = Politics  Segmentations with socio-demographic and value axes improve our insight  in peoples openess for...
Various strategies for sustainable food can co-exist                                                                      ...
The 4 phases translated to your industryTowards a healthy world?
Phase 1. Agendasetting: quarrel and/or co-operate with NGO’s?The drama behind   cheap meat     Friends of the Earth       ...
Phase 2: Marketing desired behaviour: governments actions1. Research shows: a healthy diet also helps global sustainable f...
Phase 2. UK-example: Change4life Social Marketing Plan    Pre-stage         Phase 1           Phase 2          Phase 3    ...
Phase 2. examples of public/private partnership inChange4life-strategie in de UK                                          ...
Phase 2. Governmental accredited labeling;helping or confusing consumers?Consumers may be helped by using labelingCurrentl...
The gap between the citizen and the consumer           Who do you feel is responsible for preventing unhealthy food? (2010...
The gap between the citizen and the consumer                                      % less use of   Support (%)     Support ...
Phase 2: Commercial marketing: for popularisation thebranding has to improve and the prices have to go down     In Holland...
Phase 2. Industry: retailer positioning as a responsiblebrand using the accredited labels                                 ...
Phase 2: industry: improve your production chainCan you help preventing wasting 30-50% of the food in the total chain?Can ...
Warning: “greenwashing” is dangerous     Case: test of a press campaign exposing green claims on customer loyalty         ...
Greenwashing?                                                  Clean Label congres                                        ...
Phase 3. Facilitating: organizing stimuli for desired behaviour  The average to low motivated consumer needs very convenie...
Phase 3. Facilitating: remove barriers for behaviour                                                       35
Phase 4. regulation & reinforcement: if marketing fails                                       ”                           ...
Phase 4. Self regulation: convenant “healthy weight” 2010                                                       37
Phase 4. Reinforcement: where soft regulation fails    Inspections are    often forgotten in    the stakeholder    discuss...
Conclusions and discussionTowards a healthy world?
ConclusionsWorldwide food demand is exploding due to growth of the population and incomesThe food industry should react to...
Discussion: for a popular positioning of sustainable food it’sbest to combine personal health with global sustainableprodu...
Discussion: stakeholders cooperation should improve              Can we raise the level of working together?  NGO’s       ...
However: changing our own behaviour is difficult                                                   43
More information:sibolt.mulder@tns-nipo.com    tel: +31 20 522 54 02
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How can stakeholders work together to change the food production and consumption chain? Presentation in Brussels for Ifi (int. food ingredients) congres on april 14, 2011

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TnsNipo Mulder_sustainable food_Brussels_14-4-2011

  1. 1. Towards a healthy world?Public Private Partnership in sustainablefoodchains: Brussels, April 14, 2011
  2. 2. Index1. We face growing food problems p. 4 Towards a healthy world? Public Private Partnership in2. Changing people: a little theory p. 11 sustainable foodchains: Brussels, April 14, 20113. The 4 phases translated to your industry p. 214. Conclusions and discussion p. 39 TNS NIPO, Amsterdam Auteur Sibolt Mulder TNS NIPO | © TNS
  3. 3. IntroductionDrs. Sibolt MulderSenior consultant: on building public support forgovernmental policiesRelevant projects:Dutch ministery of environment and housing: publicsupport for various types of sustainability measuresfor CO2-reduction and nature in HollandDutch Environmental Agency: Future projectionstowards 2040 of the consumption of food, traveland housing with climate consequencesMarketing opportunities for biological foodDutch Butchers Union: The sustainable butcher Sibolt.mulder@tns-nipo.comThe Greenery: branding fresh vegetables? 3
  4. 4. We face growing food problemsTowards a healthy world?
  5. 5. Growing health problems55% of the Dutch men and 45% of the women between 20-70 years are overweightIn the last 25 years the percentage of serious obese adultshas grown to 10%. Children show the same growth patternin problemsIn the coming 20 years the obesity problem will rise to 15%of the populationLower educated people and ethnic minorities are much moreat risk for obesity and it’s problemsOverweight causes 40.000 weight related patients eachyear. 5% of all deaths are weight relatedEldery people are increasing in numbers and have dieet-problems: malnutrition, diabetesCosts for the Dutch economy are about € 2 billion each year 5
  6. 6. Growing environmental problems with food-production(Note: Holland is big: the worlds second exporter of agricultural products, after the USA)Worldwide demand for meat will double to about 450 billion kilo’s a year in 2050Mineral problems: a shortage of phosphates in countries producing animal food / soilcontamination with phosphates in the Nord-West EuropeAgriculture uses about 70% of the worlds fresh water supplyWaste of food in the total chain of production varies between 30-50% (excludingconsumption spillage, which adds about 10%). Food waste is not enough being reused orrecycledUrban people don’t understand the food production process. Sensitive for hypes 6
  7. 7. Damage to biodiversity 1700 - 2050 7 Source: Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving 2008
  8. 8. Food industry is under fire. How to react? 1962 1965 2004 2011 ?Other industries have learnt to deal with it:1. Stakeholder monitoring on the corporate image of your industry and company2. Develop active Public Affairs policies aimed at a constructive stakeholders dialog3. Help inventing solutions before other do that for you…. 8
  9. 9. Dutch governmental food production policy priorities In 15 years the food patterns of the current ‘innovators’ among the consumers should become the average pattern of consumption Influencing consumers: educating them combined with a growing supply of sustainable products and diminishing supply of wrong foods Stimulation of innovation ( = money) in Dutch sustainable food production chains Reduction of waste of food Before 2010 about 15% of meat products must be produced in sustainable chains. Animal welfare levels must be socially acceptable Transparancy in production and retail chains Promoting European food regulation 9
  10. 10. Dutch governmental food consumption policy priorities Create an environment reducing the development of obesity Promote a better balance between nutrition and physical activity Early identifying and treating obesity Prevention as a part of general healthcare provision Improve parenting to protect young people Counteract malnutrition among the elderly Improve composition of food products Improve product information for the consumer Develop guidelines for good nutrition Improve animal welfare and sustainable practises in the food chain production (Source: Memorandum on Obesity, Ministerie of VWS, 2009) 10
  11. 11. Changing people: a little theoryTowards a healthy world?
  12. 12. Behaviour is mainly determined by our environment Demografy Technology Economy Politics Geografy Ecology Infrastructure Social trends 12
  13. 13. Prochaska: psychological model of phases in changeSix stages of change Change Strategy1. Precontemplation - "people are not intending to take action in the foreseeable future, usually measured as the next 6 months" consciousness2. Contemplation - "people are intending to change in the next 6 raising months"3. Preparation - "people are intending to take action in the self-reevaluation immediate future, usually measured as the next month"4. Action - "people have made specific overt modifications in their self-liberation life styles within the past 6 months"5. Maintenance - "people are working to prevent relapse," a stage which is estimated to last "from 6 months to about 5 years" Reinforcement6. Termination - "individuals have zero temptation and 100% management self-efficacy... they are sure they will not return to their old unhealthy habit as a way of coping" NOTE: People differ in their pace of adopting change
  14. 14. E. Rogers: sociological model of segments in adopting change % of population Innovators Early Adopters Early Majority Late Majority Laggards Specialists/ Ambassadors Convincable Sceptics Opponents? idealists Trendsetting in opinions Can be made aware Do not see an issue as Resistance against the First to define a trend and behaviour. Select of the problem. their problem. analyses of the problemand problem. Must fight the issues, often ahead Open to change in Opportunistic. Look to and to the solutions. for agendasetting of policymakers attitude and what happens to other Will try to avoid behaviour people who do and do compliance to not change. Calculate regulation price of change 14
  15. 15. Our various sustainability surveys show that a minoritywants a choice but the majority prefers convenience% of population The majority expect industries and governments together provides them with “good” products without responsibility to choose themselves To change average to low motivated groups the desired behaviour must be made very easy Idealists & Convenience Convincable seekersambassadors ` Opponents 3-5% 30% 3 - 5% 60- 70% 15
  16. 16. Building change, step by step, segment by segment% of population 1. Public and political 2. Introducing behaviour-options 3. Facilitating 4. Regulation & agendasetting Industry: ‘green’ innovations behaviour reinforcement Government: social marketing - remove hurdles Soft & hard Idealists & Convenience Convincable seekersambassadors ` Opponents 3-5% 30% 3 - 5% 60- 70% 16
  17. 17. Working together in a public/private partnership?% of population 1. Public and political 2. Introducing behaviour-options 3. Facilitating 4. Regulation & agendasetting Industry: ‘green’ innovations behaviour & reinforcement Government: social marketing remove hurdles Soft & hard Industry & Industry & Goverment NGO’s & government Government scientists, Convenience (Industry, Idealists & Convincable politicians seekers NGO’s) Opponentsambassadors ` 3-5% 30% 3 - 5% 60- 70% 17
  18. 18. During the phases of change-strategy the focus changes,based on the curves of attitude and behaviour Phase 1: low knowledge and sense of Phase 2. high initial resistance -> urgency offer tempting behaviour-alternatives -> agendasetting is needed 10 6 pct. of population pct of population 8 5 6 4 3 4 2 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Phase 3: a large part of the population Phase 4: resistance by a small group -> has changed regulation and reinforcement is needed -> lower hurdles for change for the next 6 segments pct of population 6 5 pct. of population 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 18
  19. 19. Food = Culture = Politics Segmentations with socio-demographic and value axes improve our insight in peoples openess for types of change •Higher education •Higher incomes Social / cultural elite •High abstract thinking-levels Liberal / business elite• moralists / socialistic thinking • Individualists / liberal thinking• seek political & legal solutions • seek economic & technical solutions• want to see development of morality • want to see effectivity & efficiency • Lower education Right wing populists Social populists •Lower incomes •Low abstract thinking-levels 19
  20. 20. Various strategies for sustainable food can co-exist Liberal / business elite Social / cultural elite •Higher education and incomes •High abstract thinking-levels •Open to change • moralists / socialistic thinking • Individualists / liberal thinking • seek political & legal solutions • seek economic & technical solutions • want to see development of morality • want to see effectivity & efficiency Social populists Right wing populists • Lower education and incomes •Conservative •Low abstract thinking-levels 20
  21. 21. The 4 phases translated to your industryTowards a healthy world?
  22. 22. Phase 1. Agendasetting: quarrel and/or co-operate with NGO’s?The drama behind cheap meat Friends of the Earth NGO’s vary in strategy. Some are radical, other are co-operative Agendasetting is their mission, so expect that from them Most value it if you even start looking for solutions with them 22
  23. 23. Phase 2: Marketing desired behaviour: governments actions1. Research shows: a healthy diet also helps global sustainable food production-goals2. Educate the population: make them conscious of the problems and the solutions3. Promote physical exercise (1 hour a day)4. Promote consumption of fruit, corn and vegetables5. Organize early medical detection of obesity6. Covenant with the Dutch food industry on healthy products and regulated advertising7. Reduce the availability of unhealthy food for the consumers (= reduce the exposure of people to these products). Food with high fat content and high energy type of food like soft drinks might be discouraged8. Reduce advertising for unhealthy food for children 23
  24. 24. Phase 2. UK-example: Change4life Social Marketing Plan Pre-stage Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Phase 5 Mobilising the Reframing the Personalising Rooting Inspiring Supporting as network of issue of the issue behaviours people to they change profit and non obesity change profit partners Change4life is This isn’t This isn’t about I know what I know people I can see the coming. We about how my bad parents or to do to like me are difference this should be part children look. very fat reduce my changing their is making of it It’s about children. family’s risk lives so I diabetes, It’s about my believe it’s cancer and children possible heart disease 24
  25. 25. Phase 2. examples of public/private partnership inChange4life-strategie in de UK 25
  26. 26. Phase 2. Governmental accredited labeling;helping or confusing consumers?Consumers may be helped by using labelingCurrently, there is still no strict regulation onlabelingIt is left to the consumer responsability to checkit’s credibilityGreenwashing and consumers loosingconfidence are dangerous trendsOfficial educational organisations like the“Voedingscentrum” (= Foodcentre) giveinformation on accredited labels.Others are not supported 26
  27. 27. The gap between the citizen and the consumer Who do you feel is responsible for preventing unhealthy food? (2010) Russia 25 28 2 2 2 40 1 Italy 28 20 21 11 5 10 5 France 33 31 4 12 6 12 2 Consumers Producers Media Spain 39 21 9 8 3 15 5 Consumers NGOs Retailers Government OthersGreat Brittain 58 18 4 3 5 7 4 Germany 69 16 3 3 2 6 1 Holland 70 15 3 3 2 5 2 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% % Source: TNS, sept. 2010 27
  28. 28. The gap between the citizen and the consumer % less use of Support (%) Support with Public support for high foodprices land without explanation (%) (for less usage of land) explanation •Tax on meat: € 1,25 per pound 2,1 38 44 •Tax on meat: € 2,50 per pound 4,1 28 36 •Tax on meat: € 5,00 per pound 6,2 21 27 •Milk + € 0,75 / litre 0,6 35 37 •Milk + € 1,50 / litre 0,9 24 26 •Milke + € 3,00 / litre 1,1 18 19 •GMO in animal feed 2,8 42 47 •GMO in animal and peoples food 4,1 32 38 The difference shows which % of the people are high or average to low motivated Bron: Veldkamp 2007 28
  29. 29. Phase 2: Commercial marketing: for popularisation thebranding has to improve and the prices have to go down In Holland the biological segment has grown about 20% in 2010 However: biological products are often 200-300% more expensive than regular products However: Biological is technically not always optimal for the environment For popularization prices for more sustainable products should go and can down Intermediate products may be the way to popularization with a reasonable price Semi-biological Consumers can brand trace the Dutch origins 29
  30. 30. Phase 2. Industry: retailer positioning as a responsiblebrand using the accredited labels 30
  31. 31. Phase 2: industry: improve your production chainCan you help preventing wasting 30-50% of the food in the total chain?Can you help making reuse and recycling easy? Adapt your packaging? General principles of gaining sustainability in production Lack of discussion in total production chain 31
  32. 32. Warning: “greenwashing” is dangerous Case: test of a press campaign exposing green claims on customer loyalty Loyalty before Loyalty after33 24 43 30 3 Eneco (n=178) 91 3 6 34 57 43 19 38 41 2 Essent (n=160) 94 06 33 61 Press campaign 48 16 36 43 5 Nuon (n=160) 94 34 32 62 20 39 38 3 93 25 33 60 41 Totaal (gem) Entrenched Average Shallow Convertible Entrenched Average Shallow Convertible 32
  33. 33. Greenwashing? Clean Label congres november 2010, Madrid Naturally and ethically improve your NPD Naturally and ethically improve your NPD Learn new ways to source natural ingredients Learn new ways to source natural ingredients ethically and be seen as ‘a moral champion’ ethically and be seen as ‘a moral champion’ above your competitors above your competitors Health benefits: Looking at the next big functional foods • Utilising vitamins and minerals to make substantial health claims which align to consumer priorities • The demand for simplicity and natural for big business wins • Demonstrating the impact on sales from buzzwords such as ‘natural’, ‘clean label’, ‘authentic’ and ‘homemade’ 33
  34. 34. Phase 3. Facilitating: organizing stimuli for desired behaviour The average to low motivated consumer needs very convenient ways to be seduced Nudge = creating stimuli for desired behaviour Healthier frying oil 34
  35. 35. Phase 3. Facilitating: remove barriers for behaviour 35
  36. 36. Phase 4. regulation & reinforcement: if marketing fails ” ed ed ne e er wh rd ha e, ibl ss po e er wh oft “S Braithwaite: Pyramid of responsive regulation 36
  37. 37. Phase 4. Self regulation: convenant “healthy weight” 2010 37
  38. 38. Phase 4. Reinforcement: where soft regulation fails Inspections are often forgotten in the stakeholder discussions A trade union could try to involve them too in policy making for an industry Braithwaite: Pyramid of responsive regulation 38
  39. 39. Conclusions and discussionTowards a healthy world?
  40. 40. ConclusionsWorldwide food demand is exploding due to growth of the population and incomesThe food industry should react to growing public opposition to health an sustainabilityproblemsKnowledge and attitude changes are not enough; the environment around the consumermust be changed; he expects it from his governments and industriesChanging behaviour in whole societies requires a step-by-step segmented strategy withpublic/private partnerships between governments and industriesIndustries in the food chain must take up the leadership in their whole chain if they want toposition themselves as a sustainable brand on planet and people issuesGovernments, industries, NGO’s and knowledge institutes must improve their strategicdialog to lower behaviour-barriers for consumers for the average to low motivatedsegments 40
  41. 41. Discussion: for a popular positioning of sustainable food it’sbest to combine personal health with global sustainableproduction: “a healthy world” High education/income Low education/income 41
  42. 42. Discussion: stakeholders cooperation should improve Can we raise the level of working together? NGO’s Level 0 = stakeholder do not know their Multinationals counterparts Level 1 = sharing information and policies EU and Level 2 = voluntary deals nationalgovernments Level 3 = shared strategies Level 4 = contracts Trade unions Local Level 5 = central steering for smallgovernments businessInspections 42
  43. 43. However: changing our own behaviour is difficult 43
  44. 44. More information:sibolt.mulder@tns-nipo.com tel: +31 20 522 54 02

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