A portfolio for teachers shpresa and andree new orleans 2011

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The use of contemporary English language teaching methods and the use of British and American textbooks are affecting classroom culture and student behavior in ways unexpected by the educational systems which have adopted them. While this has sometimes been analyzed solely in terms of cultural or linguistic imperialism, the changes can also be seen by local observers as positive and in keeping with behaviors valued by the local culture.
In educational systems which have traditionally stressed recitation and a teacher-centered classroom, the language development activities of communicatively based classes are producing not only increased fluency but also increased student confidence in forming and expressing opinions in their first language. From simple (and amusing) examples such as the eight-year-old picky eater trying a new food “because Jack in my English textbook eats it” to high school seniors with clearly increased critical thinking skills, the cultural influence of the English class extends beyond the ability to communicate in a new language.

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A portfolio for teachers shpresa and andree new orleans 2011

  1. 1. Portfolio for Professional Development SHPRESA DELIJA UNIVERSITY OF TIRANA ALBANIA [email_address] Andree Rose Catalfamo Chesapeake College Maryland [email_address] TESOL 2011 Annual Convention and Exhibit Examining the ‘E’ in TESOL March 16-19, 2011 Email: delija.sh@gmail.com 04/01/11
  2. 2. Problems and Challenges That EFL Teacher Education Meets in Albania <ul><li>Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum imposed by the Ministry of Education – lack of academic freedom </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of guidelines for the internship </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of mentoring system </li></ul><ul><li>Difficulties of coping with the great number of students ‘ thes es </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of research guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of research by departments in the field of teaching and educational scienses </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of masters ’ degree in educational sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Social & Economic changes in Albania </li></ul><ul><li>The communicative language learning and intercultural education ask for new EFL teachers to provide the student teachers with knowledge, learning strategies, intercultural communicative competences and values necessary to meet the challenges. </li></ul>04/01/11
  3. 3. Perspectives <ul><li>Tuning master s’ programs to the European patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement of the curriculum of the master programs in teacher education </li></ul><ul><li>Development of the master programs in educational sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional research projects </li></ul><ul><li>Joint master s’ programs </li></ul><ul><li>Involvement in the Erasmus Programs </li></ul>04/01/11
  4. 4. Number of students and teachers for 2009-2010 academic year <ul><li>  </li></ul>04/01/11 Education No of student Learning English % English as FL % EFL Teachers 3 – 9 grade 242519 71% 13146 3.80% 1164 10 – 12 grade 82438 74% 17824 16.% 430 165 (st teachers every year)
  5. 5. The EFL Situation in Albania <ul><li>Closed society until 1990; </li></ul><ul><li>Necessity to communicate with foreigners after the 90’s for work, business, tourism, pleasure </li></ul>04/01/11
  6. 6. What is a Teaching Portfolio? <ul><li>“ IT DESCRIBES DOCUMENTS AND MATERIALS </li></ul><ul><li>WHICH COLLECTIVELY SUGGEST THE SCOPE AND QUALITY OF A TEACHER’S PERFORMANCE.” </li></ul><ul><li>PETER SELDIN </li></ul><ul><li>(1991, P.3) </li></ul>04/01/11
  7. 7. <ul><li>Questions to be Answered 1. What is a teaching portfolio? 2. What would you like your teaching portfolio to do for you? 3. Where do I start? 4. What goals do you have during your teaching? 5. What are your most important characteristics as a teacher? 6. What kinds of methods, materials and techniques do you use to fulfill your goals? </li></ul>04/01/11
  8. 8. Why? <ul><li>European Portfolio for Student Teachers; </li></ul><ul><li>Great stress on professional development of the teachers; </li></ul><ul><li>Portfolios – Personalized collections of materials that document teaching effectiveness; </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to meet the needs of the faculty and the lectures in the new teaching stream </li></ul>04/01/11
  9. 9. Where to start? <ul><li>IN ORDER TO BEGIN DEVELOPING YOUR TEACHING </li></ul><ul><li>PORTFOLIO, CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. IT OFTEN HELPS TO ANSWER THEM WITH REFERENCE EITHER TO </li></ul><ul><li>THE COURSE YOU HAVE ENJOYED TEACHING THE MOST, OR </li></ul><ul><li>(B) THE COURSE YOU HAVE TAUGHT MOST OFTEN. </li></ul>04/01/11
  10. 10. How to prepare your Portfolio? <ul><li>Self-analysis & self-reflection to assess teaching and learning: </li></ul><ul><li>Self report as opposed to evaluative - what were you trying to do, why, how, and what was the result? </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback that provides evidence about personal growth and improvement; </li></ul>04/01/11
  11. 11. Portfolio should include: <ul><li>a list of courses taught, with brief descriptions of course content, teaching responsibilities, and student information; </li></ul><ul><li>a statement of your philosophy of teaching and factors that have influenced that philosophy; </li></ul><ul><li>examples of course materials prepared and any modifications that were made to accommodate unanticipated student needs; </li></ul><ul><li>a sample syllabus or lesson plan; </li></ul><ul><li>a description of efforts to improve teaching ( e.g., participating in seminars and workshops, reading journals on teaching, reviewing new teaching materials for your teaching; </li></ul><ul><li>possible application, pursuing a line of research that contributes directly to teaching, using instructional development services; </li></ul><ul><li>evidence of reputation as a skilled teacher, such as awards, invitations to speak, and interviews </li></ul>04/01/11
  12. 12. Data from Others <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>interviews with students after they have completed the course </li></ul><ul><li>informal (and perhaps unsolicited) feedback, such as letters or notes from students </li></ul><ul><li>systematic summaries of student course evaluations–both open-ended and restricted choice ratings </li></ul><ul><li>honors received from students, such as winning a Teaching Award department colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>examples of the instructor’s comments on student papers, tests, and assignments </li></ul><ul><li>pre- and post-course examples of students’ work, such as writing samples, creative work, and projects or field work reports </li></ul><ul><li>testimonials of the effect of the course on future studies, career choice, employment, or subsequent enjoyment of the subject </li></ul>04/01/11
  13. 13. Colleagues <ul><li>Colleagues can provide analyses and testimonials that serve as a measure of: </li></ul><ul><li>mastery of course content </li></ul><ul><li>ability to convey course content and objectives </li></ul><ul><li>suitability of specific teaching methods and assessment procedures for achieving course objectives </li></ul><ul><li>commitment to teaching as evidenced by expressed concern for student learning </li></ul><ul><li>commitment to and support of departmental/divisional instructional efforts </li></ul><ul><li>ability to work with others on instructional issues </li></ul>04/01/11
  14. 14. Data from colleagues could include: <ul><li>reports from classroom observations by other faculty or instructional specialists; </li></ul><ul><li>statements from those who teach other sections of the same course or courses for which the instructor’s course is a prerequisite; </li></ul><ul><li>evidence of contributions to course development, improvement, and innovation; </li></ul><ul><li>invitations to teach for others, including those outside the department; </li></ul><ul><li>evidence of help given to other instructors on teaching, such as sharing course materials. </li></ul>04/01/11
  15. 15. Parts of a Portfolio <ul><li>Reflective narrative </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting materials/data/documents </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback from all actors of teaching and learning </li></ul>04/01/11
  16. 16. <ul><li>QUESTIONS? </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>04/01/11

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