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Authors personal copyEcological Informatics 14 (2013) 99–103Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirectEcological I...
Authors personal copy100 S.M. Khan et al. / Ecological Informatics 14 (2013) 99–103
 Identifying plant species and communities across environmental gradients in the Western Himalayas: Method development and...
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Identifying plant species and communities across environmental gradients in the Western Himalayas: Method development and conservation use

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Phytosociological attributes of plant species and associated environmental factors were measured in order to identify the environmental gradients of major plant communities in the Naran Valley, Himalayas. The valley occupies a distinctive geographical setting on the edge of the Western Himalaya near the Hindukush range and supports a high biodiversity; pastoralism is the main land use. There have been no previous quantitative ecological studies in this region. This study was undertaken to (i) analyze and describe vegetation using classification and ordination techniques, (ii) identify environmental gradients responsible for plant community distributions and (iii) assess the anthropogenic pressures on the vegetation and identify priorities for conservation. Phytosociological characteristics of species were measured alongside environmental variables. A total of 198 species from 68 families were quantified at 144 stations along 24 transects across an elevation range of 2450–4100 m. Correspondence Analysis techniques i.e., Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) were used to determine vegetation–environment relationships. Results show vegetation changes with altitude from moist-cool temperate communities characterized by woody species, to more dry-cold subalpine and alpine herbaceous communities. Plant species diversity is optimal at middle altitudes (2800–3400 m); at lower altitudes (2400–2800 m) it is reduced by anthropogenic impacts and at higher altitudes (3400–4100 m) by shallow soils and high summer grazing pressure. A large number of plant species of conservation concern were identified in the study and an assessment made of the main threats to their survival.

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Identifying plant species and communities across environmental gradients in the Western Himalayas: Method development and conservation use

  1. 1. Authors personal copyEcological Informatics 14 (2013) 99–103Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirectEcological Informaticsjournal homepage: www . e lsevie r . com/ locate/ ecolinfIdentifying plant species and communities across environmental gradients in the WesternHimalayas: Method development and conservation useShujaul Mulk Khana,d,, Sue Pageb, Habib Ahmadc, David Harpera,a Department of Biology University of Leicester, UKb Department of Geography University of Leicester, UKc Department of Genetics Hazara University Mansehra, Pakistand Department of Botany Hazara University Mansehra, Pakistana r t i c l e i n f oArticle history:Received 16 January 2012 Accepted30 November 2012 Available online 8December 2012Keywords:VegetationWestern HimalayaClassificationOrdinationEnvironmental gradientConservationa b s t r a c tPhytosociological attributes of plant species and associated environmental factors were measured in order to identify theenvironmental gradients of major plant communities in the Naran Valley, Himalayas. The valley occupies a distinctivegeographical setting on the edge of the Western Himalaya near the Hindukush range and supports a high biodiversity;pastoralism is the main land use. There have been no previous quantitative ecological studies in this region. This study wasundertaken to (i) analyze and describe vegetation using clas-sification and ordination techniques, (ii) identify environmentalgradients responsible for plant community distributions and (iii) assess the anthropogenic pressures on the vegetation andidentify priorities for conser-vation. Phytosociological characteristics of species were measured alongside environmentalvariables. A total of 198 species from 68 families were quantified at 144 stations along 24 transects across an elevation rangeof 2450–4100 m. Correspondence Analysis techniques i.e., Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and CanonicalCorrespondence Analysis (CCA) were used to determine vegetation–environment relationships. Results show vegetationchanges with altitude from moist-cool temperate communities characterized by woody species, to more dry-cold subalpineand alpine herbaceous communities. Plant species diversity is optimal at middle altitudes (2800–3400 m); at lower altitudes(2400–2800 m) it is reduced by anthropogen-ic impacts and at higher altitudes (3400–4100 m) by shallow soils and highsummer grazing pressure. A large number of plant species of conservation concern were identified in the study and anassessment made of the main threats to their survival.© 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.Correspondence to: S.M. Khan, Department of Biology University of Leicester, UK. Tel.: +447536461784; +92 3349311639.Corresponding author. Tel.: +44 7536461784; +92 3349311639. E-mailaddress: shuja60@gmail.com (S.M. Khan).1574-9541/$ – see front matter © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoinf.2012.11.010
  2. 2. Authors personal copy100 S.M. Khan et al. / Ecological Informatics 14 (2013) 99–103

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