War	<br />Edgar Wallace<br />
Edgar Wallace was a medical orderly in<br />South Africa when the war begun. <br />Later he became a war correspondent.<br...
Written from point of view of a medical orderly.<br />He is observing the surgeon’s attempts to save a wounded man.<br />W...
I<br />A tent that is pitched at the base:<br />A wagon that comes from the night:<br />A stretcher –and on it a Case:<br ...
II<br />A tent, with a table athwart,<br />A table that’s laid out for one:<br />A waterproof cover – and nought<br />But ...
III<br />The clink of a stopper and glass:<br />A sigh as the chloroform drips:<br />A trickle of – what? On the grass,<br...
The ‘message’ of the poem<br />War! But the part that is not for show…<br />This is the brutal reality of war.<br />Where ...
‘A’ simple noun, repeated 3 times, list effect, reinforces scale & continuity of actions.<br />I<br />A tent that is pitch...
Interior of tent, an operating table across the middle. Uses contrast of a dinner table, laid for one to eat, this is ‘lai...
Anaesthetic, sigh of  relief from the injured as he loses consciousness, life?<br />Probably blood, life blood, the injure...
Wallace had first hand experience of war.<br />He had been an orderly so knew the <br />extent of the orderly’s job & how ...
Where are the following in the poem?<br />Onomatopoeia- a word that sounds like that it is describing<br />Metaphor- two  ...
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War edgar wallace

  1. 1. War <br />Edgar Wallace<br />
  2. 2. Edgar Wallace was a medical orderly in<br />South Africa when the war begun. <br />Later he became a war correspondent.<br />He blended his knowledge of the horrible effects of battle with the vivid style of the journalist in his poem War. <br />An eye witness account of the battle field operating theatre.<br />
  3. 3. Written from point of view of a medical orderly.<br />He is observing the surgeon’s attempts to save a wounded man.<br />We hear the surgeons instructions to the orderly & they reflect the mounting panic & stress of the situation.<br />Lots of repetition, at times almost like a list, this enhances the sense of futility at the constant source of casualties, ‘cannon fodder’. Only just have time to wipe the knife.<br />
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  5. 5. I<br />A tent that is pitched at the base:<br />A wagon that comes from the night:<br />A stretcher –and on it a Case:<br />A surgeon, who’s holding a light,<br />The Infantry’s bearing the brunt –<br />O hark to the wind-carried cheer!<br />A mutter of guns at the front:<br />A whimper of sobs at the rear.<br />And it’s War! ‘Orderly, hold the light.<br />You can lay him down on the table: so.<br />Easily-gently! Thanks – you may go.’<br />And it’s War! But the part that is not for show.<br />
  6. 6. II<br />A tent, with a table athwart,<br />A table that’s laid out for one:<br />A waterproof cover – and nought<br />But the limp, mangled work of a gun.<br />A bottle that’s stuck by the pole,<br />A guttering dip in its neck:<br />The flickering light of a soul<br />On the wandering eyes of The Wreck, <br />And its War! Orderly, hold his hand.<br />I’m not going to hurt you, so don’t be afraid. <br />A ricochet! God! What a mess it has made!’<br />And its War! And a very unhealthy trade.<br />
  7. 7. III<br />The clink of a stopper and glass:<br />A sigh as the chloroform drips:<br />A trickle of – what? On the grass,<br />And bluer and bluer the lips.<br />The lashes have hidden the stare…<br />A rent, and the clothes fall away…<br />A touch, and the wound is laid bare…<br />A cut, and the face has turned grey…<br />And its War! ‘orderly, take it out.<br />Its hard for his child, and its rough on his wife.<br />There might have been – sooner – a chance for his life<br />But its War! And – Orderly, clean this knife!’<br />
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  9. 9. The ‘message’ of the poem<br />War! But the part that is not for show…<br />This is the brutal reality of war.<br />Where men die on tables, without the surgeon knowing his name. <br />He is referred to as ‘it’ on a waterproof cover to catch the blood.<br />A brief thought about his family and then its on to the next casualty with barely time to wipe the knife..<br />
  10. 10. ‘A’ simple noun, repeated 3 times, list effect, reinforces scale & continuity of actions.<br />I<br />A tent that is pitched at the base:<br />A wagon that comes from the night:<br />A stretcher –and on it a Case:<br />A surgeon, who’s holding a light,<br />The Infantry’s bearing the brunt –<br />O hark to the wind-carried cheer!<br />A mutter of guns at the front:<br />A whimper of sobs at the rear.<br />And it’s War! ‘Orderly, hold the light.<br />You can lay him down on the table: so.<br />Easily-gently! Thanks – you may go.’<br />And it’s War! But the part that is not for show.<br />Injured soldier brought in. De personified, he is a ‘case’, something to be processed.<br />What is this cheer? Have they won the battle? Contrast of emotions, battle triumph with injured agony. Wind carries news, unreliable communication in war.<br />Infantry, foot soldiers, hand to hand combat, coming of worst<br />Spoken words add realism, continual noises of battle, difficult to drown out despite physical distance.<br />Short phrase, like a command, repeated at same point throughout stanzas. Exclamation mark & italic, the glory of war yet here is the reality.<br />They are gentle & polite, contrast to later in poem.. Speech marks convey conversation.<br />The image of an injured man is not what the public want to see or hear about<br />
  11. 11. Interior of tent, an operating table across the middle. Uses contrast of a dinner table, laid for one to eat, this is ‘laid’ for one casualty.<br />Practicalities, waterproof to catch the blood & gore. They have neither time nor resources to wash the tables down between men.<br />II<br />A tent, with a table athwart,<br />A table that’s laid out for one:<br />A waterproof cover – and nought<br />But the limp, mangled work of a gun.<br />A bottle that’s stuck by the pole,<br />A guttering dip in its neck:<br />The flickering light of a soul<br />On the wandering eyes of The Wreck, <br />And its War! Orderly, hold his hand.<br />I’m not going to hurt you, so don’t be afraid. <br />A ricochet! God! What a mess it has made!’<br />And its War! And a very unhealthy trade.<br />No sustenance as one would find on a dinner table, this has the mangled body of a man after a gun has inflicted injuries on him.<br />Candle stuck in a bottle, flickering, nearly going out like the life its illuminating.<br />Frightened, in & out of consciousness<br />The case is now a wreck, he is deterioating before ours & the surgeons eyes.<br />When a bullet bounces off something<br />Very visual image of ‘mess’, usually covered up, here is the horror of war.<br />Euphemistic irony. The trade between states and statesmen, bargaining, treaties etc.<br />Humanity, recognises the man’s fear, even though he’s one of many, compassionate<br />
  12. 12. Anaesthetic, sigh of relief from the injured as he loses consciousness, life?<br />Probably blood, life blood, the injured mans spirit & life, lost so easily<br />III<br />The clink of a stopper and glass:<br />A sigh as the chloroform drips:<br />A trickle of – what? On the grass,<br />And bluer and bluer the lips.<br />The lashes have hidden the stare…<br />A rent, and the clothes fall away…<br />A touch, and the wound is laid bare…<br />A cut, and the face has turned grey…<br />And its War! ‘orderly, take it out.<br />Its hard for his child, and its rough on his wife.<br />There might have been – sooner – a chance for his life<br />But its War! And – Orderly, clean this knife!’<br />Vivid, imagery of blue lips that signify death<br />Rip away his clothes to locate wound, panic in surgeon now, trying everything to save him.<br />Another contrast: case-wreck-it<br />Another statistic, quite sinister image<br />Brief consideration for man’s life & family<br />Recrimination of surgeon of his own skills & system. If the casualty had got to him sooner, maybe he could have been saved<br />No time to dwell for long though. Urgency & abrupt order to clean the knife, ready for the next one in a long line of War’s reality.<br />
  13. 13. Wallace had first hand experience of war.<br />He had been an orderly so knew the <br />extent of the orderly’s job & how they <br />were treated by the surgeons.<br />He met Rudyard Kipling in <br />S. Africa. I wonder what sort<br />of conversations they had about the war?<br />Can’t get too emotionally attached to the <br />casualties<br />He was also a journalist <br />so did have a dramatic,<br />sensational mode of <br />expression.<br />
  14. 14. Where are the following in the poem?<br />Onomatopoeia- a word that sounds like that it is describing<br />Metaphor- two things claimed they are the same<br />Assonance-repetition of vowel sounds<br />Ironic humour- an obvious understatement<br />Emotive word- word that stirs emotional response.<br />Impersonal pronoun - it<br />Rule of three- concept that points in threes are more effective<br />Pathos- a poem that makes us feel sorrow for others suffering<br />

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