The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps

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The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps

  1. 1. SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of theRecession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps April 18, 2013
  2. 2. Introduction• This is part two (recruiting and skill gaps) of the California results from a series of SHRM survey findings about the ongoing impact of the U.S. and global recession, which began in 2007. California and U.S. results are compared, and statistically significant differences are indicated with an asterisk (*).• Part one results (financial health and hiring) includes the following sections:  Organizations’ financial health.  Hiring.  Creating completely new positions.  Demographics.• Part two results (recruiting and skill gaps) includes the following sections:  Recruiting challenges.  Skill gaps.  Recruiting strategies.  The Impact of strategic technological changes.  Demographics.• Overall and industry-specific results can be found on our website at www.shrm.org/surveys. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 2
  3. 3. Recruiting Challenges The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 3
  4. 4. Key Findings: Recruiting Challenges California• Is it difficult to recruit for positions requiring new and different skill sets? More than two- thirds (70%) of organizations reported it was somewhat or very difficult to recruit for completely new positions or positions with new duties added that required new and different skill sets.• Is recruiting for specific jobs difficult in the current labor market? Nearly two-thirds (65%) of organizations currently hiring full-time staff indicated that they are having a difficult time recruiting for specific job openings.• Why are organizations experiencing difficulty hiring qualified candidates? One-half (50%) of organizations indicated that candidates do not have the right skills for the job, and 42% said candidates do not have the right work experience. Over one-third (38%) reported that qualified candidates are not within their organization’s salary or hourly price range, and 34% cited competition from other employers as a reason for difficulty in hiring.• Are organizations facing global competition for applicants for hard-to-fill jobs? Seventeen percent of organizations believe they are facing global competition for qualified applicants for jobs they are having difficulty filling. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 4
  5. 5. Implications for HR: Recruiting Challenges California• Recruiting difficulty may be here to stay for the foreseeable future. With more than two-thirds (70%) of organizations reporting some level of recruiting difficulty for completely new positions or positions with new duties added that required new and different skill sets, many organizations are having trouble filling some key vacancies. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of organizations currently hiring full-time staff indicated that they are having a difficult time recruiting for specific job openings. With large numbers of Baby Boomers poised to exit the labor market through retirement, more positions could open up, making recruiting even more challenging.• With the retirement of the Baby Boomers, organizations may have to get more comfortable hiring employees with fewer years of experience to fill some jobs. One-half (50%) of organizations indicated that candidates do not have the right skills for the job, and 42% said candidates do not have the right work experience. Though employees within the Generation X demographic may have acquired enough years of experience to replace the Baby Boomers, this generation is much too small to replace the Baby Boomers completely. As a result, organizations may have to fill some roles with less experienced Millennials.• Wage inflation could begin to occur for hard-to-fill jobs. SHRM data have shown new-hire compensation rates as relatively flat over the previous five years (see the SHRM LINE® survey at www.shrm.org/line for more on this), but this may be changing as the need to fill vacancies grows. Over one-third (38%) reported that qualified candidates are not within their organization’s salary or hourly price range, and 34% cited competition from other employers as a reason for difficulty in hiring. In the case of hard-to-fill jobs, organizations may need to reconfigure budgets to enable them to offer the competitive compensation packages needed to recruit and retain employees with the needed skills and experience. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 5
  6. 6. Implications for HR: Recruiting Challenges (continued)California• Global competition for skilled and educated employees is likely to increase in the years ahead. Although currently only 17% of organizations believe they are facing global competition for qualified applicants for jobs they are having difficulty filling, as working-age populations around the world shrink, competition for qualified workers is likely to grow. Larger organizations especially could increase their numbers of hires from outside the U.S. Businesses in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields are also likely to look outside U.S. borders for the needed workers, as is already occurring in the high-tech industry.• Over the next several years, many organizations will focus on improving their recruiting processes as a way to deal with greater challenges in filling jobs. More dollars set aside for recruiting are likely to lead to even more investments in expanding advertising efforts while organizations will also hone their use of social media to find passive job seekers.• In the longer term, many organizations may have to boost their training investments to build qualified talent from within. Lack of qualifications and competition for talent are among the top reasons HR professionals give for difficulty hiring qualified full-time employees; training existing employees can help more of them qualify for hard-to-fill jobs and also acts as a retention tool. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 6
  7. 7. For the new full-time regular positions being created by your organization that require new and different skill sets, how easy or difficult do you think it will be or has it been thus far to find qualified individuals for those positions? California 5% Very easy 4% 25% Somewhat easy California 33% (n = 150) United States 59% (n = 852) Somewhat difficult 53% 11% Very difficult 10%Note: Only respondents whose organizations were hiring full-time staff for positions with “new duties added to jobs lost” or“completely new positions” that required either “a mixture of new skills and the same types of skills” or “completely new anddifferent skills” were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 7
  8. 8. In general, in the current labor market, is your organization having a difficult time recruiting for certain types of full-time regular positions that are open in your organization? California California United States No, 35% No, 34% Yes, 65% Yes, 66% n = 346 n = 2,562Note: Respondents who answered “don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizationswere currently hiring full-time staff were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 8
  9. 9. What are the main reason(s) that your organization experiences difficulty in hiring qualified candidates for full-time regular positions? California Candidates do not have the right skills for 50% the job 48% Candidates do not have the right work 42% experience 40% Qualified candidates are not within our 38% salary range or hourly range rate 35% California 34% (n = 224) Competition from other employers 35% United States (n = 1,647) 23% Low number of applicants 24% Candidates do not have the needed 17% credentials/certifications 21%Candidates do not have high enough levels 13% of education/training 11%Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Respondents who answered “don’t know” wereexcluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficult time recruiting for certain types ofjobs were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 9
  10. 10. What are the main reason(s) that your organization experiences difficulty in hiring qualified candidates for full-time regular positions? (continued) California Qualified candidates are not interested in 11% moving to our local area 14% Qualified candidates are not able to move to 8% our local area (due to mortgage or other issues) 6% 7% Candidates are overqualified 6% California Our local education/training system does not 5% (n = 224) produce enough work-ready/qualified job candidates 6% United States (n = 1,647) 4% Lack of interest in type of job 6% Our organization does not provide relocation 4% funds 4% 10% Other 7%Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Respondents who answered “don’t know” wereexcluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficult time recruiting for certain types ofjobs were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 10
  11. 11. Do you believe that your organization is facing global competition (i.e., competition from other countries) for talent for hard-to-fill jobs? California California United States Yes, 13% Yes, 17% No, 83% No, 87% n = 200 n = 1,492Note: Respondents who answered “don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizationswere having a difficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 11
  12. 12. Skill GapsThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 12
  13. 13. Key Findings: Skill Gaps California• What basic skills/knowledge gaps do job applicants typically have? The most common basic skills/knowledge gaps are writing in English (62%), English language (spoken) (40%), reading comprehension (38%) and mathematics (34%).  California is more likely than the U.S. to indicate gaps in writing in English (62% versus 55%), English language (spoken) (40% versus 29%), and reading comprehension (38% versus 31%).• What applied skill gaps do job applicants typically have? The top four applied skill gaps are critical thinking/problem solving (57%), professionalism/work ethic (49%), written communications (46%) and leadership (41%).  California (28%) is more likely to report gaps in creativity skills compared with the U.S. (21%).• What types of jobs are the most difficult to fill? The top five most difficult positions to fill are highly skilled positions: high-skilled medical (e.g., nurses, doctors, specialists) (88%), engineers (85%), high-skilled technical (e.g., technicians and programmers) (85%), scientists (85%), and managers and executives (82%).  The U.S. (34%) is more likely to report difficulty recruiting for hourly laborers compared with California (20%). The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 13
  14. 14. Implications for HR: Skill Gaps California• Basic skills/knowledge gaps, especially in written and spoken English, may be a growing challenge for California employers. California HR professionals are more likely than the rest of the U.S. to report gaps in written and spoken English among applicants. This may mean that they will be more likely to need to provide basic skills training for their employees or to get more involved in educational initiatives aimed at improving California students’ basic skills.• Encouraging creativity may be of particular importance to California HR professionals. Although the applied skill gaps that California HR professionals identify are similar to those reported by HR professionals across the rest of the U.S. (such as critical thinking/problem solving, professionalism/work ethic, written communications and leadership), California HR professionals are more likely to report gaps in creativity skills compared with their counterparts elsewhere in the U.S. This may be a reflection on the types of industries that are based in California and could lead many organizations to seek out innovations in building a more creative organizational culture and/or boosting individual creativity.• High-skilled jobs will be the most difficult to fill in California for the foreseeable future. Currently the most difficult positions to fill in California are highly skilled positions. This trend is likely to continue into the future and could lead to recruiting challenges.• Because of their unique labor market challenges, California organizations may become more involved in collaborating with their local educational institutions. Working more closely with education and training providers may help California organizations address skill and knowledge gaps and create a more qualified local talent pool. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 14
  15. 15. In general, what basic skills/knowledge gaps do job applicants have in your industry? California *Writing in English (e.g., grammar, spelling) 62% 55% *English language (spoken) 40% 29% *Reading comprehension (in English) 38% 31% Mathematics (computation) 34% 38% Science 15% 14% California Government/economics 9% (n = 287) 13% 8% United States Foreign languages 8% (n = 1,928) Technical 7% (e.g., computer, engineering, mechanical) 11% History/geography 3% 2% Humanities/arts 3% 2% Other 11% 9%Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficulttime recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference betweenorganizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 15
  16. 16. In general, what applied skill gaps do job applicants have in your industry? California Critical thinking/problem solving 57% 53% Professionalism/work ethic 49% 46% Written communications 46% 41% Leadership 41% 38% Oral communications 36% 34% 31% California Information technology application 29% (n = 319) Teamwork/collaboration 29% United States 33% (n = 2,168) *Creativity/innovation 28% 21% Lifelong learning/self-direction 23% 21% Diversity 19% 18% Ethics/social responsibility 18% 18% Other 6% 5%Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficulttime recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates there is a statistically significant differencebetween organizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 16
  17. 17. Specific job categories for which organizations are having difficulty recruiting: California High-skilled medical 88% (e.g., nurses, doctors, specialists) (CA n = 51, U.S. n = 366) 83% Engineers 85% (CA n = 100, U.S. n = 751) 86% High-skilled technical 85%(e.g., technicians, programmers) (CA n = 149, U.S. n = 1,093) 85% 85% California Scientists (CA n = 40, U.S. n = 242) 88% United States Managers and executives 82% (CA n = 178, U.S. n = 1,248) 77% Skilled trades (e.g., electricians, carpenters) 68% (CA n = 76, U.S. n = 687) 70% Sales representatives 63% (CA n = 86, U.S. n = 584) 68% Note: This figure represents “Somewhat difficult” and “Very difficult” responses. “Not applicable” responses were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 17
  18. 18. Specific job categories for which organizations are having difficulty recruiting: (continued) California Accounting and finance professionals (CA n = 48% 157, U.S. n = 1,154) 53% HR professionals 45% (CA n = 125, U.S. n = 888) 49% Production operators 35% (CA n = 60, U.S. n = 467) 44% Customer service representatives 32% California (CA n = 117, U.S. n = 806) 31% United States Drivers 28% (CA n = 47, U.S. n = 378) 41% Administrative support staff 20% (CA n = 179, U.S. n = 1,344) 21% *Hourly laborers 20% (CA n = 97, U.S. n = 851) 34%Note: This figure represents “Somewhat difficult” and “Very difficult” responses. “Not applicable” responses were excluded from this analysis.Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. An asterisk(*) indicates there is a statistically significant difference between organizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 18
  19. 19. Recruiting Strategies The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 19
  20. 20. Key Findings: Recruiting Strategies California• What strategies is your organization using to deal with recruiting challenges for full-time regular positions? The most common strategies that organizations reported are using social media to find passive job seekers (49%), expanding advertising efforts (45%), expanding the search region (39%), increasing retention efforts (37%) and training existing employees to take on the hard-to-fill positions (33%).  California (30%) is more likely to provide monetary incentives to candidates (e.g., signing bonus) as a recruiting strategy compared with the U.S. (24%).• Have organizations been hiring workers from outside the U.S. for jobs that have been difficult to fill? About three in 10 (29%) organizations have hired workers from outside the U.S. Another 6% are either considering or have plans to hire workers from outside the U.S. in the next 12 months.• Have organizations been hiring U.S. veterans for jobs that have been difficult to fill? Nearly one-half (47%) of organizations reported hiring U.S. veterans, and 19% are either considering or have plans to hire veterans in the next 12 months.  The U.S. (58%) is more likely to have hired U.S. veterans for jobs that have been difficult to fill compared with California (47%). The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 20
  21. 21. Implications for HR: Recruiting Strategies California• Organizations may be relying more on social media to find passive job seekers. In California and across the U.S., a growing number of HR professionals report that they are using social media to find passive job seekers and to build their employer brand. This strategy is most likely to occur for jobs with very specific skills and experience requirements.• Hiring workers from outside the U.S. for jobs that have been difficult to fill may be an increasingly attractive option. If recruiting difficulty makes it even harder to fill some jobs, more organizations are likely to look beyond U.S. borders to find qualified candidates.• California HR professionals may benefit from developing hiring initiatives that focus on U.S. veterans. Veterans may be an untapped source of talent for California’s employers as California HR professionals are less likely to report that they have hired U.S. veterans for jobs that have been difficult to fill compared with their HR counterparts in the U.S. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 21
  22. 22. What strategies is your organization using to deal with recruiting challenges for full-time regular positions? California 49% Using social media to find passive jobseekers 44% 45% Expanding advertising efforts 47% 39% Expanding search region 36% California 37% (n = 224) Increasing retention efforts 32% United States (n = 1,635) Training existing employees to take on the 33% hard-to-fill positions 33% 31% Collaborating with education institutions 37%*Providing monetary incentives to candidates 30% (e.g., signing bonus) 24% Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Only respondents whose organizations were having a difficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference between organizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 22
  23. 23. What strategies is your organization using to deal with recruiting challenges for full-time regular positions? (continued) California 25% Improving compensation/benefits package 24% 22% Offering more flexible work arrangements 22% Expanding training programs to help improve 19% skills of new hires California 21% (n = 224) 6% United States Offering new job perks (n = 1,635) 5% 5% Other 5% None; we have not changed our recruiting 5% strategy 8%Note: Percentages do not total 100% due to multiple response options. Only respondents whose organizations were having adifficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 23
  24. 24. Has your organization hired any workers from outside the United States in an attempt to staff key jobs that have been difficult to fill? California California United States (n = 221) (n = 1,556) 72% 65% 29% 24% 5% 4% 1% 0% Yes *No No, but we are No, but we have considering it plans to do so in the next 12 monthsNote: Respondents who answered “don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations werehaving a difficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significantdifference between organizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 24
  25. 25. Has your organization hired any U.S. veterans in an attempt to staff key jobs that have been difficult to fill? California California United States (n =193) (n = 1,415) 58% 47% 34% 26% 14% 12% 5% 4% *Yes *No No, but we are No, but we have considering it plans to do so in the next 12 monthsNote: Respondents who answered “don’t know” were excluded from this analysis. Only respondents whose organizations werehaving a difficult time recruiting for certain types of jobs were asked this question. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significantdifference between organizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 25
  26. 26. Has your organization hired any U.S. veterans in an attempt to staff key jobs that have been difficult to fill? CaliforniaComparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 25,000 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 499 employees to have hiredU.S. veterans in an attempt to recruit for hard-to-fill jobs. Comparisons by organization staff size: Hired U.S. veterans 1 to 99 employees (22%) 25,000 or more employees (91%) > 100 to 499 employees (36%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 26
  27. 27. The Impact of StrategicTechnological Changes The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 27
  28. 28. Key Findings: The Impact of Strategic Technological Changes California• How many organizations are making major technology changes that affect the work of employees? Over one-third (37%) of organizations indicated that in the last 12 months they had made major strategic changes involving the use of technology (e.g., robotics, computerized systems, software technologies) that affect the work of employees, and 10% plan to do so in the next 12 months.  California (37%) is more likely than the U.S. (30%) to have made major technology changes in the past year that affect the work of employees.• Will these technological changes affect the number of full-time regular employees? For organizations that have made technological changes in the last 12 months or that plan to in the next 12 months, 59% indicated that the number of employees will stay the same. One-quarter (25%) reported there will be an increase, and 15% a decrease, in the total number of employees.  California (25%) is more likely to report an increase in staff as a result of technological changes compared with the U.S. (16%), whereas the U.S. is more likely to indicate the number of employees will stay the same (71% versus 59%).• Will these technological changes affect what employee skills are required for the organization? Although 71% of organizations indicated these technological changes would require new skills, they would not require new staff. Nineteen percent indicated employees would require the same skills, and 10% would need to hire new staff for the new skills that would be required. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 28
  29. 29. Implications for HR: The Impact of Strategic Technological Changes California• Changes in technology may require investments in employee training. California organizations are especially likely to have made major technology changes in the past year that affect the work of employees. This may mean that California employers will also need to invest in training so technology use is maximized for productivity.• For California organizations, improved technology is likely to create new jobs. With California HR professionals more likely to report an increase in staff as a result of technological changes compared with the U.S. overall, the development of new technologies appears to be helping California employers become more productive and to be creating jobs overall.• Technology may be leading to a more rapid turnover in the skills needed to do many jobs. This could encourage a more intense war for talent for individuals possessing in-demand skills and a greater emphasis on technical training for existing employees. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 29
  30. 30. In the last 12 months, has your organization made any major strategic changes involving the use of technology (e.g., robotics, computerized systems, software technologies) that affect the work of employees? California California United States (n = 478) (n = 3,324) 59% 53% 37% 30% 10% 10% *Yes *No No, but we have plans to do so in the next 12 monthsNote: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. An asterisk (*) indicates a statistically significant difference betweenorganizations in California compared with those in the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 30
  31. 31. As a result of these technological changes, has or will the total number of full-time regular employees at your organization increase, stay the same or decrease? California California United States (n = 226) (n = 1,345) 71% 59% 25% 16% 15% 13% *Increase *Stay the same DecreaseNote: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. Only respondents whose organizations made or planned to make any majorstrategic changes involving the use of technology in the past 12 months or next 12 months were asked this question. An asterisk (*)indicates a statistically significant difference between organizations in California compared those in with the United States. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 31
  32. 32. As a result of these technological changes, has or will the total number of full-time regular employees at your organization decreased? CaliforniaComparisons by organization staff size• Organizations with 2,500 or more employees are more likely than organizations with 1 to 99 employees to have adecrease in the total number of full-time regular employees as a result of recent or planned technological changes. Comparisons by organization staff size: Decrease in total number of full-time regular employees 2,500 to 24,999 employees (43%) > 1 to 99 employees (3%) 25,000 or more employees (40%)Note: Only statistically significant differences are shown. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 32
  33. 33. How have or will these technological changes affect the employee skills required in your organization? California California United States (n = 226) (n = 1,345) 71% 72% 19% 18% 10% 10%do not need to hire new staff (e.g., existing staff can be trained iffor which we need to hire new staff Require the same skills Require new skills, necessary) Note: Only respondents whose organizations made or planned to make any major strategic changes involving the use of technology in the past 12 months or next 12 months were asked this question. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 33
  34. 34. DemographicsThe Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 34
  35. 35. Demographics: Organization Industry California Professional services 22% 13% Health 13% 13% Manufacturing 11% 14% State or local government 9% 20% California 8% (n = 489) Finance 11% United States 8% (n = 3,481) High-tech 7% Construction, mining, oil and gas 5% 10% Federal government 2% 7% Other 22% 6%Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 35
  36. 36. Demographics: Organization Sector California 48% Privately owned for-profit 43% 19% Publicly owned for-profit 17% California 17% (n = 473) Nonprofit 12% United States (n = 3,294) 12% Government 25% 3% Other 3%Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 36
  37. 37. Demographics: Organization Staff Size California 30% 1 to 99 employees 26% 32% 100 to 499 employees 33% California 16% (n = 460) 500 to 2,499 employees 19% United States (n = 3,208) 14%2,500 to 24,999 employees 16% 8%25,000 or more employees 6% The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 37
  38. 38. Other Demographics California Is your organization a single-unit organization or aDoes your organization have U.S.- multi-unit organization?based operations (business units) only,or does it operate multinationally? CA U.S. CA U.S. Single-unit organization: An organization in which the location and the 34% 36% U.S.-based operations organization are one and the same. 74% 76% only Multinational Multi-unit organization: An organization 26% 24% 66% 64% operations that has more than one location. n = 478 (CA), 3,325 (U.S.) n = 476 (CA), 3,311 (U.S.) For multi-unit organizations, are HR policies and practices determined by the multi-unit headquarters,What is the HR department/function for by each work location or by both?which you responded throughout thissurvey? CA U.S. CA U.S. Multi-unit headquarters determines HR 46% 50% policies and practices Corporate 65% 68% Each work location determines HR (companywide) 4% 3% policies and practices Business unit/division 22% 19% A combination of both the work location Facility/location 13% 13% and the multi-unit headquarters 50% 47% determines HR policies and practices n = 328 (CA), 2,206 (U.S.) n = 327 (CA), 2,204 (U.S.) The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 38
  39. 39. SHRM Survey Findings: The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill GapsSurvey Methodology• California response rate = 10%• United States response rate = 15%• 491(California) and 3,481 (United States) HR professionals from a randomly selected sample of SHRM’s membership participated in this survey• Margin of error: California +/-4%, United States +/-2%• Survey fielded August 28 through September 14, 2012 The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 39
  40. 40. About SHRM Research• For more survey/poll findings, visit www.shrm.org/surveys• For more information about SHRM’s Customized Research Services, visit www.shrm.org/customizedresearch• Follow us on Twitter @SHRM_ResearchProject leader: Tanya Mulvey, survey research analyst, SHRM ResearchProject contributors: Alexander Alonso, Ph.D., SPHR, vice president, SHRM Research Evren Esen, manager, Survey Research Center, SHRM Research Jennifer Schramm, GPHR, manager, Workplace Trends and Forecasting, SHRM ResearchCopy editor: Katya Scanlan, SHRM Knowledge Center The Ongoing Impact of the Recession—California Recruiting and Skill Gaps ©SHRM 2013 40

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