Millennials Rising Programming and Collections for the Next Generation of Library Users Jennifer Czajka, Monica Harris, & ...
 
 
Pop Culture Touchstones: Gen Y <ul><li>Median Gen Y graduated from high school in: 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>top single: Hang...
Pop Culture Touchstones: Gen X <ul><li>When Gen X graduated from high school: 1988 </li></ul><ul><li>top single: Faith by ...
 
&quot;Gen Y has a new notion of privacy.  The whole 'never trust anyone    over 30' will turn into 'never trust anyone who...
<ul><li>  </li></ul>
<ul><li>  </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>  </li></ul>
 
  <ul><li>What does adult services mean in your library? </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  <ul><li>Where Do They Go? What Do They Want? How Can We Help? </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>-Linda Braun, YALSA ...
  <ul><li>The Disconnected </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>-Kathy Degyansky, Library Journal  </li></ul><ul><li>July...
Identifying a Demographic
The Evolution of genre X OPPL identifies a need for more 20s/30s programming First step - an unusual take on the tradition...
Meeting your audience where  they're at
Books and Bars
Its All About the Book
Extending the book discussion online
Expanding OPPL's genre X Programming    
   
+
 
 
 
     
 
 
 
 
Lessons Learned
40 Ideas        for your own Twenties and Thirties Programming
Resume Help & Entry-Level Job Fairs    
Mock Interview Workshops    
Financial Literacy Workshop    
Health Care Support & Information    
Intro to Wedding Planning    
Buying Your First Home Workshop    
Photoshop/Podcasting/E-Business Classes    
Building a Blog    
Be Your Own Boss / DIY Business    
Interior Design for Small Spaces    
Sustainability & Organic Gardening     
Exploring Ink: History of Tattooing    
Getting to Know Graffiti     
Cooking Classes    
Nutrition/Menu Planning/Smart Shopping    
Get Crafty    
Book Swap    
NaNoWriMo MeetUp     
&quot;Real Life&quot; Second Life MeetUp    
Graphic Design Show n' Tell    
Home Cure / Conquer Clutter MeetUp    
Bring in an author they LOVE    
Movie & TV Screenings    
Spoken Word    
Diary Reading    
Speed Dating in the Stacks    
Board Game Night    
Prom / Dance Party in the Stacks    
Live Band Karaoke    
Sponsor a Scavenger Hunt    
Host a Walking Tour of Your Community    
Rock Band / Guitar Hero World Tour    
Wiimbledon    
Poker / Texas Hold 'Em Tournament    
Bingo    
Spelling Bee    
Project Runway Style Sewing Competition    
Top Chef Competition    
Poster Design Contest    
Bibs / Playlists Contest    
Recommended Media    
Contact Us <ul><li>Mandy McGee </li></ul><ul><li>Manager of Adult and  </li></ul><ul><li>Teen Services </li></ul><ul><li>O...
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Millennials Rising: Programming and Collections for the Next Generation of Library Users

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Presentation on the generational profiles of library patrons in their 20s and 30s. Includes information on the Oak Park Public Library's genre X book discussion group and programming ideas for patrons in their 20s and 30s.

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  • Ambitious, confident, optimistic.  They also measure high on stress, conventionality, and an over-reliance on parents.   Likely to resist labels.  More subcultures, more comfort with a unique position.  Some feel &amp;quot;post-generational&amp;quot;   More comfortable with teamwork than previious generations.  More apt to reject social codes and politics they were introduced to as children.    What defines them:  Some experts suggest the Iraq war, so Millennials reject that, saying the war is not central to their existence.  Some suggest the internet, although nearly all generations are embracing the internet.  Other suggest level of educational degrees and student loan and consumer debt.    The first generation in the last last three that calls itself &amp;quot;liberal&amp;quot;   Generation Nintendo   Despite near constant access to media, they have been protected from harm more than any previous generation because of new laws and regulations put into place during their childhood.    They are &amp;quot;generally happy&amp;quot;.  They respond best to external motivators.  Work hard, play hard.   Strongly attached to parents or siblings - especially mothers. 
  • Teens and Gen Y are more likely to look for entertainment and social networks online Online teens are also significantly more likely to play games than any other generation, including Generation Y, only half (50%) of whom play online games.   The share of adult internet users who have a profile on an online social network site has more than quadrupled in the past four years -- from 8% in 2005 to 35% now, according to the Pew Internet &amp; American Life Project&apos;s December 2008 tracking survey.     Contrary to the image of Generation Y as the &amp;quot;Net Generation,&amp;quot; internet users in their 20s do not dominate every aspect of online life. Generation X is the most likely group to bank, shop, and look for health information online. Boomers are just as likely as Generation Y to make travel reservations online. And even Silent Generation internet users are competitive when it comes to email (although teens might point out that this is proof that email is for old people).
  • Anyone know what this is?  Just kidding.  But I&apos;d like to take an informal phone.  Raise your hand if you still have a landline.  Now raise your hand if you are relying only on mobile service for your home phone needs?  Cellphones are also changing the way the world connects.   As of 2008, one in five American households has no landline.  That&apos;s 20%, compared to under 5% in 2003.  Most likely to have no landline?  Under 30s. Another possible casuality of the cellphone?
  • Its likely that the mainstay of the wristwatch will become extinct as its predecessor - the pocket watch.   As most people carry around mobiles with access to the time, the wristwatch is no longer necessary. 
  • More about the mobile: Fast growing segment of the digital community.  Use cell phones and smart phones to access the internet. 9% of adults now using mobile devices to connect with others and share information 8% of adults lack robust access to the internet, but they like their cell phones.  Internet use may be infrequent, but the are likely to have taken a picture or sent a text message.
  • More casualities of today&apos;s media user:   Industry experts reporting that Christmas 2008 was the last season for traditional music CDs.  Suggestions include &apos;Burn on demand&apos; and broadening digital content beyond music.   Desktop computer sales fell by 23% in 2008.  80% of sales go to notebooks.
  • Who&apos;s been successful with marketing towards this group?  Here&apos;s a few: Apple, Scion, Converse, Facebook, and Nintendo - and the Obama campaign.  Reasons why - customizable.  Allows customers to personalize the product to their own taste and identity.  This generation has marketing savvy and pointedly ignores Facebook ads and fast forwards through commercials on their DVR. If they find something to care about in the product - they have tremendous brand loyalty - going so far as advertising for the product themselves through fan support and content creation. 
  • Bringing it back to libraries. I am a proud teen services librarian.  For years public and school libraries have worked hard to erase the gap in service affecting kids after they finish elementary school. We&apos;ve all heard the old adage that kids leave the library and don&apos;t return until they have kids of their own.   So what happens to all of those well served teens when they age out of teen programs at age 18?  What do we have to offer them?  Why, just as they are beginning to vote in our referendums and have adult voices in our communities, are we dropping our services to them? 
  • YALSA recently posted an article by Linda Braun about how to serve active teen patrons aging out of their programming and space. At New York Public Library, when teens reach age 18 they are no loner allowed to participate in programming or hang out in spaces designed specifically for adolescents.  NYPL recently held a get together with 18, 19, and 20 year olds to ask them about their ideas for a space of their own.  The most important part of their library experience - the part they wanted to see replicated for them as adults?  They wanted to find ways to continue to build relationships with each other and with the library staff that supported them.   
  • YALSA recently posted an article by Linda Braun about how to serve active teen patrons aging out of their programming and space. At New York Public Library, when teens reach age 18 they are no loner allowed to participate in programming or hang out in spaces designed specifically for adolescents.  NYPL recently held a get together with 18, 19, and 20 year olds to ask them about their ideas for a space of their own.  The most important part of their library experience - the part they wanted to see replicated for them as adults?  They wanted to find ways to continue to build relationships with each other and with the library staff that supported them.   
  • *  Ultimately before you develop any programming that is targeted at a specific demographic, you need to identify these users and why they are important to your community. Why is it neccesary to develop programming for them?    * Surveys and focus groups can be very useful ways of gathering information from your audience. For example, a small group of staff members have been working on marketing services and developing programs aimed to boomers at OPPL. They encouraged their colleaugues to invite boomer patrons to fill out a survey that asked them questions about programming. Then the followed this up by olding a drop-in session where people could actually sit down and discuss these ideas with them. The efforts were both really successful and drew insight from 50+ people.   * Take advantage of the members on staff who would be the most invested in marketing to the demographic and assign them to spear head the project. If the demographic is age based, that doesn&apos;t necessarily mean that staff must fall into the age bracket they are targeting. The key is simply to choose those who are enthusiastic about the objective and willing to devote their time to making it happen.
  • * In 2007 we identified that we were not seeing patrons in their twenties and thirties represented at our adult programs. However plenty of young parents were coming out to attend our childrens&apos; programs. So we wanted to develop a way to offer programming aimed at all members of this demographic, parents and nonparents alike.   * Immediately we began thinking about a twenties and thirties book discussion. Experience had shown that our regular library book discussions might occasionally attract a younger person here and there, but by and large the audience is older. How could we reach out to a population of readers that we knew existed in Oak Park, but weren&apos;t necessarily heavy library users? Answer - hold the discussion off site, someplace that those in their twenties and thirties often go anyway.    * As soon as we decided to go for a non traditional book discussion, we immediately began discussing how we could market ourselves and the library to this demographic. We fairly quickly decided that a blog would serve as the best method to reach our audience.
  • * We decided to take our book discussion outside of the library to the bar for several reasons.   Meeting our audience where they&apos;re at:   Since we weren&apos;t seeing this demographic attending the library&apos;s programs, we figured we would bring library programming to them. There is no reason library programming needs to be confined to the library. Consider it a good stewardship initiative to bring the library&apos;s resources to the community. And where better to go to meet up with those in their twenties and thirties than a bar?   Gen X and Gen Ys are on the go. They often work long hours and have lots of social obligations and opportunities outside of work, so we would need to develop a book discussion with an extra incentive to attract them. So initially we decided to rotate around about 4-5 different bars in the area. In the beginning we weren&apos;t sure how much location would act as an appeal factor and we hoped that traveling around might benefit the group by offering wider exposure.   We also decided to have it a little later than your average evening library book discussion to allow people enough time to get home before coming out. Fortunately all of the bars we chose were close to public transportation, which is important for those who rely on this and may not live close to Oak Park.    With the freedom to order food and drink and free from the confines of the &amp;quot;shh&amp;quot; mentality that is often upheld at the library, holding a book discussion in a bar generates a comfortable atmosphere to speak freely (and loudly and sometimes profanely) and to network with those your age. After rotating through several bars, we discovered that the sound was definitely an issue. The group grew quickly, from 4 people in September to 19 in January, so we needed to find a place that could guarantee us space for however many people we attracted as well as a low amount of external noise. Attempting to facilitate a discussion with 19 patrons and 3 facilitators in a bar that also pumps music and has TVs to distract was somewhat difficulut to say the least. Fortunately we were able to find a home at Molly Malone&apos;s, which is actually in our neighbor town of Forest Park. Its close to the El and they have a small room that is separate from the bar, which offers us the intimacy we were looking for while still maintaing the bar vibe. And despite some fluctation in the service, when we approached the idea of possibly mixing up locations again last summer, our group was not in favor of changing.
  • * Of course the other important component to pulling off a successful book discussion is choosing the right books for your audience. We have learned a lot from our experience and seem to be getting better at tailoring the titles that we choose to our group.        1.) In general we try to choose books that at least one of us has already read, primarily just to assure that we know the book is discussable. Even if we read it and didn&apos;t absolutely love it, we might still identify it as a potentially solid choice for discussion. The three of us have different tastes and we have used that to our advantage when selecting titles.   LESSON - We&apos;ve learned through that our group is not really interested in having the author speak at a discussion. While we were really excited to offer this opportunity both to the author and the group, afterwards we decided not to choose to do this again, especially not with a book that none of us had read. 2.) We also have learned to provide some balance in our selections. LESSON - Last summer we also decided to pursue a series of Chicago &amp;quot;themed&amp;quot; selections - books where Chicago was practically a character. While two out of three books were well received, the group really didn&apos;t seem that into the theme concept.    
  • * Part of our goal with genre X was not only to reach out to twenties and thirties users in our community, but also to offer users who may not be able to ever attend an actual discussion a way to share engage with us.
  • In the fall of 2008 we began planning our first non book discussion event. ALA announced the first annual National Gaming Day and that helped us to solidify a date.
  • Different Program Types:   *Informative *Meet-Up Groups *Entertainment *Contests &amp; Tournaments
  • Cover of Tamara Draut&apos;s book on understanding the financial crisis of Gen X and Y The economy has hit everyone hard - including this generation. Offer a class on constructing a household budget, beginning retirement savings,  or investments 101.  
  • Invite a Health Care worker in your community to discuss health topics specifically relevant to 20s and 30s: family planning, fertility help, etc.   Or present options for health care coverage and insurance for the wide variety of people making up this age group: artists, musicians &amp; those otherwise self employed, stay at home parents, and part time employees with no benefits.
  • Invite a wedding planner to share ideas &amp; inspiration for planning a beautiful wedding.  Be sure to include advice, tips and truths about sticking to a budget, too, as many 20s and 30s are looking to save on wedding day festivities and splurge on travel or a down payment for a home. Or consider inviting vendors, photographers, DJs, etc to share portfolios with prospective clients.
  • Offer a session on obtaining a mortgage, determining safe limits, and information about the first time home buying tax credit.    Invite mortgage brokers &amp; realtors working in your area to present.
  • Offer classes in tech skills that this generation is looking for. Find people in your community or staff that do these things and ask them to teach a class.  Or form partnerships with organizations offering similar skills training and host the classes at your library. 
  • Many twenties are already participating in blogging culture, though there&apos;s so much that goes into making a blog successful. Customizing a blog Determining your audience Reaching intended audience Properly citing sources
  • Jenny Hart, founder &amp; creative director of Sublime Stitching, sometime poster child of DIY/craft business.   &amp;quot;This ain&apos;t your gramma&apos;s embroidery.&amp;quot;   Seek out several people who&apos;ve been similarly successful starting up DIY/crafty business to share their advice for making this dream become a reality.
  • Budget friendly options for sprucing up small spaces including DIY fixes, redecorating with existing furniture, etc.
  • With all of the recent focus on the imporatance of organic food and DIY, 20s and 30s are getting interested in gardening and growing their own food again. Work in an urban environment? Focus on container gardening and community gardens.    
  • Tattoo artist Hannah Aitchison from TLC reality show, L.A. Ink.   The popularity of tattooing among men and women in their 20s and 30s is rising, more books are being published on the subject, and serious attention is finally being paid to the history of this important outsider artform.     Intuit Museum in Chicago is currently hosting &amp;quot;Freaks &amp; Flash,&amp;quot; a gallery show devoted to exploring the roots of modern western tattooing.   Bring in artists from local tattoo shops to do the same in your community.
  • Graffiti is another outsider artform that&apos;s slowly gaining recognition for it&apos;s historical significance.  Bring in somebody who&apos;s part of the scene, or was, to provide an insider view of what graffiti is really all about. 
  • Partner with local chefs &amp; businesses to bring cooking skills, tips, and recipes into your library. Offer food related programs that do not require a full kitchen such as knife skills, cake decorating or exploring spices.   For inspiration, see Denver Public Library who&apos;s partnered with Whole Foods to bring &amp;quot;World Kitchen: Chef Cooking Demos&amp;quot; to their patrons.  Upcoming offerings include a cookie exchange, as well as tours of bacon, cheese and chocolate.   
  •   
  • Libraries are a natural meeting place for crafters so open yours up to local knitters, crocheters and sewers.     Many craft groups, like the popular Stitch &apos;n Bitch knitting groups spread accross the world, are self sufficient and only seek space.  Alternatively, you can host craft programs that focus on a specific crafts that can be completed in one session: sock monkeys, plushy monsters, fingerless gloves, etc.
  • From the Chicago Reader Book Swap at the Cobra Lounge in 2008
  • NaNoWriMo, an annual novel writing project taking place in November, challenges writers to complete 50,000 words (around 175 pages) in the course of a month.   A growing number of these books are published, and Find participants in your area and offer them a space to meet up and share experiences &amp; compare notes.  Up the ante by inviting published local authors to share their advice on the writing process.
  • Second Life, an online social interface, allows people to interact both socially and economically in a 3D virtual space. Statistics indicate that the amount of virtual gaming users in growing as quickly as 15% a month and show no signs of stopping.   Provide an opportunity for players to meet up in &amp;quot;real life&amp;quot; to discuss their online experiences.
  • Chicago&apos;s Show n&apos; Tell Show allows graphic designers and artists to get together and share inspirations, processes and products.    Find members of your community active in the arts to present their bodies of work in a similar format.
  • Bring Apartment Therapy&apos;s popular Home Cure participants to your library for a meet-up. Create clutter conquering challenges and meet periodically to share progress, discuss effects.
  • Author Chuck Palahniuk is just one example of an author that this generation responds to.  Find out who 20s/30s are reading and if you can get them for an author visit.
  • Choose cult classics, 80s favorites, or more contemporary films with real appeal to those in their 20s and 30s. More bang for your buck: host a viewing of a popular television series.  Our suggestions: short lived favorites like early 90&apos;s David Lynch directed Twin Peaks, or the show that put Judd Apatow on the Map, Freaks and Geeks.
  • Joshua Sa-Ra of West Palm Beach, the curator and MC of the &amp;quot;SpeakEasy&amp;quot; poetry night.   Just offer a monthly open mic, or think about holding a slam with judges and prizes.  
  • From &amp;quot;Grownups Read Things They Wrote as Kids&amp;quot;, a self professed &amp;quot;unstoppably rad&amp;quot; reading series started in Toronto. Other popular series include: Cringe (Brooklyn) Salon of Shame (Seattle)  
  • Participants are given a name tag, a scorecard, and paired up with strangers.  Then they can have a seven minute conversation about anything but their careers and where they live.  When the seven minutes are up the &apos;mover&apos; shifts to the next table.  At the end of the conversation both particiants mark whether or not they&apos;d lie to see that person again and if they show a mutual interest organizers send out contact information.   Make it library themed!  Ask participants to bring a book along as an ice breaker.  And it might be best to set an age range.  
  • From Rooks Comics and Games in Bozeman, Montana Comic book shops have been doing this for years!  Just open up some tables and break out the games.   Have your own supply or encourage participants to bring their own.  
  • Another dose of nostalgia: even for those who can remember it like it was yesterday because it wasn&apos;t far off.  This image is from 826 CHI&apos;s annual prom, a fundraiser to help support their writing programs for kids. Hold your dance to raise more money for library programming, or just for fun.   Related: &amp;quot;Garage Bands&amp;quot; in your library garage - an ALA suggestion.   
  • Hire or borrow a band and hold an after hours live band karaoke event.   This can be a purely social event or you can have prizes or themes.  Its up to you.  
  • A team participating in Midnight Madness - a 24 hour scavenger hunt in NYC based after the 1980 Michael J Fox movie of the same name.   Create your own theme to coincide with seasons, book titles or reading programs.
  • Don&apos;t assume that all members of your community know it&apos;s rich history, or where to find it&apos;s most scenic spots.  Many people in their 20s and 30s may have recently moved into your community and having chose it to as their home, likely want to know more.
  • Rock Band competition from Microsoft software developers mixer in 2007
  • Inaugural competition at Barcade in Brooklyn, NY in June 2007
  • Old school games
  • Create themed Bingo (ie: Bad Movie Bingo) to accompany library programs, books, etc.
  • Bobby &amp; Jen from Williamsburg Spelling Bee - &amp;quot;The Original Adult Spelling Bee, in Brooklyn NY&amp;quot;.   They credit their success with the emergence of &amp;quot;geek chic&amp;quot; so what more fitting venue for an adult spelling bee than your local library.
  • Photo from the Scion Fashion Feud in Columbus Ohio. Contestants were given one hour to construct and fit an outfit for their model.  
  • Images from the Bucktown Apple Pie Competition.   No baking on site required!  Just recruit a panel of hungry judges and have local bakers bring their best creations to your door for the event.
  • This Spring, Chicago Public Library received over 100 submisssions in their &amp;quot;Not What You Think&amp;quot; poster design contest.  30 finalists were chosen and the lucky winner was unveiled at a large scale event. Apply the same formula at your library for a program poster, brochure, web site facelift, or even library merchandise: t-shirts, tote bags, etc. which ca turn the contest into a great fundraising opportunity.
  • Hold a contest for the best book bibliographies, material lists, or music playlists centered around a theme of your choosing.   ie: Poe
  • Millennials Rising: Programming and Collections for the Next Generation of Library Users

    1. 1. Millennials Rising Programming and Collections for the Next Generation of Library Users Jennifer Czajka, Monica Harris, & Mandy McGee Oak Park Public Library 11.11.09
    2. 4. Pop Culture Touchstones: Gen Y <ul><li>Median Gen Y graduated from high school in: 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>top single: Hangin' By a Moment / Lifehouse </li></ul><ul><li>top movie: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone </li></ul><ul><li>top television: Friends </li></ul><ul><li>Nostalgic for: Nintendo, Saved By the Bell, The New Kids on the Block </li></ul><ul><li>September 11th, 2001, debate over stem cell research reaches public consciousness </li></ul>
    3. 5. Pop Culture Touchstones: Gen X <ul><li>When Gen X graduated from high school: 1988 </li></ul><ul><li>top single: Faith by George Michael </li></ul><ul><li>top movie: Rain Man </li></ul><ul><li>top television: Roseanne </li></ul><ul><li>CDs outsell vinyl for the first time, Robert C McFarlane pleads guilty in Iran-Contra case, 98% of US households have at least one television set </li></ul>
    4. 6.  
    5. 7. &quot;Gen Y has a new notion of privacy.  The whole 'never trust anyone    over 30' will turn into 'never trust anyone who doesn't have embarrassing stuff online' &quot; - Jerry Michalski , founder and president of Sociate  
    6. 8. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    7. 9. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    8. 11. <ul><li>  </li></ul>
    9. 13.   <ul><li>What does adult services mean in your library? </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    10. 14.   <ul><li>Where Do They Go? What Do They Want? How Can We Help? </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>-Linda Braun, YALSA Blog </li></ul><ul><li>Sunday, June 7th, 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    11. 15.   <ul><li>The Disconnected </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>-Kathy Degyansky, Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>July 15th, 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    12. 16. Identifying a Demographic
    13. 17. The Evolution of genre X OPPL identifies a need for more 20s/30s programming First step - an unusual take on the traditional library book discussion            Second step - developing an online presence to promote our efforts
    14. 18. Meeting your audience where  they're at
    15. 19. Books and Bars
    16. 20. Its All About the Book
    17. 21. Extending the book discussion online
    18. 22. Expanding OPPL's genre X Programming    
    19. 23.    
    20. 24. +
    21. 28.      
    22. 33. Lessons Learned
    23. 34. 40 Ideas        for your own Twenties and Thirties Programming
    24. 35. Resume Help & Entry-Level Job Fairs    
    25. 36. Mock Interview Workshops    
    26. 37. Financial Literacy Workshop    
    27. 38. Health Care Support & Information    
    28. 39. Intro to Wedding Planning    
    29. 40. Buying Your First Home Workshop    
    30. 41. Photoshop/Podcasting/E-Business Classes    
    31. 42. Building a Blog    
    32. 43. Be Your Own Boss / DIY Business    
    33. 44. Interior Design for Small Spaces    
    34. 45. Sustainability & Organic Gardening    
    35. 46. Exploring Ink: History of Tattooing    
    36. 47. Getting to Know Graffiti    
    37. 48. Cooking Classes    
    38. 49. Nutrition/Menu Planning/Smart Shopping    
    39. 50. Get Crafty    
    40. 51. Book Swap    
    41. 52. NaNoWriMo MeetUp    
    42. 53. &quot;Real Life&quot; Second Life MeetUp    
    43. 54. Graphic Design Show n' Tell    
    44. 55. Home Cure / Conquer Clutter MeetUp    
    45. 56. Bring in an author they LOVE    
    46. 57. Movie & TV Screenings    
    47. 58. Spoken Word    
    48. 59. Diary Reading    
    49. 60. Speed Dating in the Stacks    
    50. 61. Board Game Night    
    51. 62. Prom / Dance Party in the Stacks    
    52. 63. Live Band Karaoke    
    53. 64. Sponsor a Scavenger Hunt    
    54. 65. Host a Walking Tour of Your Community    
    55. 66. Rock Band / Guitar Hero World Tour    
    56. 67. Wiimbledon    
    57. 68. Poker / Texas Hold 'Em Tournament    
    58. 69. Bingo    
    59. 70. Spelling Bee    
    60. 71. Project Runway Style Sewing Competition    
    61. 72. Top Chef Competition    
    62. 73. Poster Design Contest    
    63. 74. Bibs / Playlists Contest    
    64. 75. Recommended Media    
    65. 76. Contact Us <ul><li>Mandy McGee </li></ul><ul><li>Manager of Adult and  </li></ul><ul><li>Teen Services </li></ul><ul><li>Oak Park Public Library </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(708) 452-3450 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Monica Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Assistant Manager of Adult  </li></ul><ul><li>and Teen Services </li></ul><ul><li>Oak Park Public Library </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>(708) 452- 3456 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>Jennifer Czajka Library Assistant Oak Park Public Library   (708) 452- 3455 [email_address]

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