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Forces and the Laws of Motion
Chapter 4
Pg. 118-143
+




4.1Changes in Motion
+
        What do you think?
 What      is a force?
 Are   any forces acting on your book as it rests on
    your desk?
...
+
    Forces
     Forces   can change motion.
      An action exerted on an object which may
       change the object’s ...
+
    Forces
     Contact    forces
      Pushes  or pulls requiring
       physical contact between the
       objects
...
+
    Units of Force

     The   SI unit of force is the newton (N).
      Named   for Sir Isaac Newton
      Defined a...
+ Force Diagrams
 Forces are vectors (magnitude and
 direction).

  Force   diagram (a)    Free-body    diagram
   Show...
+
    Free-Body Diagrams


                          Three
                               forces are
                    ...
+
        Now what do you think?

 What    is a force?
 What   forces act on your book as it rests on your
    desk?
   ...
+




4.2 Newton’s First Law
+
           What do you think?
 Imagine       the following two situations:
       Pushing a puck across an air hockey ...
+
    Newton’s First Law

     Experimentation led Galileo to the idea that
     objects maintain their state of motion o...
+
    Newton’s First Law

    Called    the law of inertia
    Inertia
      Tendency  of an object not to accelerate
 ...
+
    Newton’s First Law

     Which   object in each pair has more inertia?
      A baseball at rest or a tennis ball a...
+
    Net Force - the Sum of the Forces


                   This
                       car is moving with a
           ...
+
    Net Force - the Sum of the Forces

                                  Fnormal- normal force
                        ...
+
    Net Force - the Sum of the Forces


                                  X-axis
              F normal
               ...
+




4.3 Newton’s Second and Third
Laws
+
        What do you think?

 If a net force acts on an object, what type of
    motion will be observed?
     Why?

 ...
+
    Newton’s Second Law




     Increasing       the force will increase the acceleration.
        Which produces a g...
+
Newton’s Second Law (Equation Form)




     F represents the vector sum of all forces
     acting on an object.
     ...
+
    Example


    2 people are studying at a large table. The
     one student pushes a 2.2 kg book across
     the tab...
+
    Example


     F=ma

     a=   F/m
     a=   1.6/2.2
     a=   0.73 m/s2
+
    Classroom Practice Problem


     Space-shuttleastronauts experience
     accelerations of about 35 m/s2 during tak...
+
               What do you think?
       Two football players, Alex and Jason, collide head-on. They have the
        s...
+
              What do you think?
       Suppose Alex has twice the mass of Jason. How would the forces
        compare?...
+
    Newton’s Third Law


    Forces   always exist in pairs.
      You  push down on the chair, the chair
       pushe...
+
    Newton’s Third Law


     3rd   Law states:
      Forevery action force there is an equal and
       opposite reac...
+
    Hammer Striking a Nail

     What  are the action/reaction pairs for a hammer
     striking a nail into wood?
     ...
+
    Action-Reaction: A Book on a Desk

    Action Force                 Reaction Force

                                ...
+
    Action-Reaction: A Falling Book

    Action                          Reaction

     Earthpulls down on the        •...
+
           Now what do you think?
 If a net force acts on an object, what type of motion will
    be observed?
       ...
+
           Now what do you think?
    Two football players, Alex and Jason, collide head-on. For
     each scenario belo...
+
    DON’T DO FROM HERE
+




4.4 Everyday Forces
+
         What do you think?

     How do the quantities weight and mass differ
     from each other?
     Which of the...
+
    Weight and Mass
     Mass    is the amount of matter in an object.
      Kilograms,     slugs

     Weightis a me...
Normal Force
 Forceon an object
  perpendicular to the surface
  (Fn)
 Itmay equal the weight (Fg),
  as it does here.
...
+
    Net Force - the Sum of the Forces

                                  Fnormal- normal force
                        ...
+
    Net Force - the Sum of the Forces


                                  X-axis
              F normal
               ...
Static Friction
 •   Force that prevents motion
 •   Abbreviated Fs
                        – How does the applied force (...
Kinetic Friction
 • Force between surfaces that opposes movement
 • Abbreviated Fk
 • Does not depend on the speed

      ...
+
    Friction

      Click below to watch the Visual Concept.



                         Visual Concept
+
    Calculating the Force of Friction (Ff)

     Ff   is directly proportional to Fn(normal force).




     Coefficie...
Typical Coefficients of Friction
 Values   for   have no units and are approximate.
+
    Everyday Forces

      Click below to watch the Visual Concept.



                         Visual Concept
+
    Classroom Practice Problem

     A 24 kg crate initially at rest on a horizontal
     floor requires a 75 N horizon...
Classroom Practice Problem
 A student  attaches a rope to a 20.0 kg box
  of books. He pulls with a force of 90.0 N at
  ...
+
    The Four Fundamental Forces


     Electromagnetic           Strong   nuclear force
      Caused   by            ...
+
            Now what do you think?
     How do the quantities weight and mass differ
     from each other?
     Which ...
+
    Example


     Derek  Leaves his physics book on top of
     a drafting table that is inclined at a 35°
     angle....
+
    Example


     Given:
      F table-on-book =  18N
      F gravity-on-book = 22N         Y

      F friction= 11...
+
    Example


     What   can I do now??          Y

      Make  a triangle!!!
      Now we can figure out
       vec...
+
    Example

                           X   = Fgcosθ
 θ=   180-90-35
                           X   = (22N) cos 55°
...
+
    Example


     X-   axis            Y-   axis
     Fnet   = Fa + F f    Fnet   = F n + Fg
+
    Example


     A man   is pulling his dog with a force of
     70N directed at an angle of 30° to the
     horizont...
Equilibrium
  The state in which the net
  force is zero.
     All forces are balanced.
     Object is at rest or trave...
+
    Classroom Practice Problem

     An agricultural student is designing a support
     system to keep a tree upright....
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Forces and Laws of Motion

  1. 1. + Forces and the Laws of Motion Chapter 4 Pg. 118-143
  2. 2. + 4.1Changes in Motion
  3. 3. + What do you think?  What is a force?  Are any forces acting on your book as it rests on your desk?  If so, describe them.  Make a sketch showing any forces on the book.  What units are used to measure force?  Can forces exist without contact between objects? Explain.
  4. 4. + Forces  Forces can change motion.  An action exerted on an object which may change the object’s state of rest or motion  Start movement, stop movement, or change the direction of movement  Cause an object in motion to speed up or slow down
  5. 5. + Forces  Contact forces  Pushes or pulls requiring physical contact between the objects  Baseball and bat  Field forces  Objects create force fields that act on other objects.  Gravity, static electricity, magnetism
  6. 6. + Units of Force  The SI unit of force is the newton (N).  Named for Sir Isaac Newton  Defined as the force required to accelerate a 1 kg mass at a rate of 1 m/s2  Other units are shown below.
  7. 7. + Force Diagrams Forces are vectors (magnitude and direction).  Force diagram (a)  Free-body diagram  Shows all forces (b) acting during an  Shows only forces interaction acting on the  On the car and on object of interest the wall  On the car
  8. 8. + Free-Body Diagrams  Three forces are shown on the car.  Describe each force by explaining the source of the force and where it acts on the car.  Is each force a contact force or a field force?
  9. 9. + Now what do you think?  What is a force?  What forces act on your book as it rests on your desk?  Make a sketch showing any forces on the book.  Are they contact forces or field forces?  What SI unit is used to measure force?  What equivalent basic SI units measure force?
  10. 10. + 4.2 Newton’s First Law
  11. 11. + What do you think?  Imagine the following two situations:  Pushing a puck across an air hockey table  Pushing a book across a lab table  What should your finger do in each case to maintain a constant speed for the object as it moves across the table or desk? (Choose from below.)  A quick push or force, then release the object  Maintain a constant force as you push the object  Increase or decrease the force as you push the object  Explain your choice for the puck and the book.
  12. 12. + Newton’s First Law  Experimentation led Galileo to the idea that objects maintain their state of motion or rest.  Newtondeveloped the idea further, in what is now known as Newton’s first law of motion:
  13. 13. + Newton’s First Law Called the law of inertia Inertia  Tendency of an object not to accelerate  Mass is a measure of inertia  More mass produces more resistance to a change in velocity
  14. 14. + Newton’s First Law  Which object in each pair has more inertia?  A baseball at rest or a tennis ball at rest  Answer: the baseball  A tennis ball moving at 125 mi/h or a baseball at rest  Answer: the baseball
  15. 15. + Net Force - the Sum of the Forces  This car is moving with a constant velocity.  Fforward = road pushing the tires  Fresistance = force caused by friction and air  Forces are balanced  Velocityis constant because the net force (Fnet) is zero.
  16. 16. + Net Force - the Sum of the Forces  Fnormal- normal force working on objects F normal  Fgravity- force of gravity pulling it down  Ffriction-friction acting on F acceleration object to pull it back F friction  Facceleration- force of acceleration pulling it forward F gravity
  17. 17. + Net Force - the Sum of the Forces  X-axis F normal  Fnet = Fa + F f F acceleration  Y- axis F friction  Fnet = F n + Fg F gravity
  18. 18. + 4.3 Newton’s Second and Third Laws
  19. 19. + What do you think?  If a net force acts on an object, what type of motion will be observed?  Why?  How would this motion be affected by the amount of force?  Are there any other factors that might affect this motion?
  20. 20. + Newton’s Second Law  Increasing the force will increase the acceleration.  Which produces a greater acceleration on a 3-kg model airplane, a force of 5 N or a force of 7 N?  Answer: the 7 N force  Increasing the mass will decrease the acceleration.  A force of 5 N is exerted on two model airplanes, one with a mass of 3 kg and one with a mass of 4 kg. Which has a greater acceleration?  Answer: the 3 kg airplane
  21. 21. + Newton’s Second Law (Equation Form)  F represents the vector sum of all forces acting on an object.  F = Fnet  Units for force: mass units (kg) acceleration units (m/s2)  The units kg•m/s2 are also called newtons (N).
  22. 22. + Example 2 people are studying at a large table. The one student pushes a 2.2 kg book across the table to the other with a force of 1.6N. What is the acceleration?  F= ma  Given:  F= 1.6N m= 2.2 Kg a=??
  23. 23. + Example  F=ma  a= F/m  a= 1.6/2.2  a= 0.73 m/s2
  24. 24. + Classroom Practice Problem  Space-shuttleastronauts experience accelerations of about 35 m/s2 during takeoff. What force does a 75 kg astronaut experience during an acceleration of this magnitude?  Answer: 2600 kg•m/s2 or 2600 N
  25. 25. + What do you think?  Two football players, Alex and Jason, collide head-on. They have the same mass and the same speed before the collision. How does the force on Alex compare to the force on Jason? Why do you think so?  Sketch each player as a stick figure.  Place a velocity vector above each player.  Draw the force vector on each and label it (i.e. FJA is the force of Jason on Alex).
  26. 26. + What do you think?  Suppose Alex has twice the mass of Jason. How would the forces compare?  Why do you think so?  Sketch as before.  Suppose Alex has twice the mass and Jason is at rest. How would the forces compare?  Why do you think so?  Sketch as before.
  27. 27. + Newton’s Third Law Forces always exist in pairs.  You push down on the chair, the chair pushes up on you  Called the action force and reaction force  Occur simultaneously so either force is the action force
  28. 28. + Newton’s Third Law  3rd Law states:  Forevery action force there is an equal and opposite reaction force.  The forces act on different objects.  Therefore, they do not balance or cancel each other.  The motion of each object depends on the net force on that object.
  29. 29. + Hammer Striking a Nail  What are the action/reaction pairs for a hammer striking a nail into wood?  Force of hammer on nail = force of nail on hammer  Force of wood on nail = force of nail on wood  Which of the action/reaction forces above act on the nail?  Force of hammer on nail (downward)  Force of wood on nail (upward)  Does the nail move? If so, how?  Fhammer-on-nail>Fwood-on-nail so the nail accelerates downward
  30. 30. + Action-Reaction: A Book on a Desk Action Force Reaction Force  The book pushes down on  The desk pushes up on the desk. the book.  Earth pulls down on the  The book pulls up on book (force of gravity). Earth.
  31. 31. + Action-Reaction: A Falling Book Action Reaction  Earthpulls down on the • The book pulls up on book (force of gravity). Earth.  What is the result of the • What is the result of action force (if this is the the reaction force? only force on the book)? • Unbalanced force  Unbalanced force produces a very small produces an acceleration upward acceleration of -9.81 m/s2. (because the mass of Earth is so large).
  32. 32. + Now what do you think?  If a net force acts on an object, what type of motion will be observed?  Why?  How would this motion be affected by the amount of force?  Are there any other factors that might affect this motion?
  33. 33. + Now what do you think? Two football players, Alex and Jason, collide head-on. For each scenario below, do the following:  Sketch each player as a stick figure.  Place a velocity vector above each player.  Draw the force vector on each and label it.  Draw the acceleration vector above each player.  Scenario 1: Alex and Jason have the same mass and the same speed before the collision.  Scenario2: Alex has twice the mass of Jason, and they both have the same speed before the collision.  Scenario 3: Alex has twice the mass and Jason is at rest.
  34. 34. + DON’T DO FROM HERE
  35. 35. + 4.4 Everyday Forces
  36. 36. + What do you think?  How do the quantities weight and mass differ from each other?  Which of the following terms is most closely related to the term friction?  Heat, energy, force, velocity  Explain the relationship.
  37. 37. + Weight and Mass  Mass is the amount of matter in an object.  Kilograms, slugs  Weightis a measure of the gravitational force on an object.  Newtons,pounds  Depends on the acceleration of gravity  Weight = mass acceleration of gravity W = mag where ag = 9.81 m/s2 on Earth  Depends on location  ag varies slightly with location on Earth.  ag is different on other planets.
  38. 38. Normal Force  Forceon an object perpendicular to the surface (Fn)  Itmay equal the weight (Fg), as it does here.  Itdoes not always equal the weight (Fg), as in the second example.  Fn = mg cos
  39. 39. + Net Force - the Sum of the Forces  Fnormal- normal force working on objects F normal  Fgravity- force of gravity pulling it down  Ffriction-friction acting on F acceleration object to pull it back F friction  Facceleration- force of acceleration pulling it forward F gravity
  40. 40. + Net Force - the Sum of the Forces  X-axis F normal  Fnet = Fa + F f F acceleration  Y- axis F friction  Fnet = F n + Fg F gravity
  41. 41. Static Friction • Force that prevents motion • Abbreviated Fs – How does the applied force (F) compare to the frictional force (Fs)? – Would Fs change if F was reduced? If so, how? – If F is increased significantly, will Fs change? If so, how? – Are there any limits on the value for Fs?
  42. 42. Kinetic Friction • Force between surfaces that opposes movement • Abbreviated Fk • Does not depend on the speed  Usingthe picture, describe the motion you would observe.  The jug will accelerate.  How could the person push the jug at a constant speed?  Reduce F so it equals Fk.
  43. 43. + Friction Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept
  44. 44. + Calculating the Force of Friction (Ff)  Ff is directly proportional to Fn(normal force).  Coefficient of friction ( ):  Determined by the nature of the two surfaces  s is for static friction.  k is for kinetic friction.  s> k
  45. 45. Typical Coefficients of Friction  Values for have no units and are approximate.
  46. 46. + Everyday Forces Click below to watch the Visual Concept. Visual Concept
  47. 47. + Classroom Practice Problem  A 24 kg crate initially at rest on a horizontal floor requires a 75 N horizontal force to set it in motion. Find the coefficient of static friction between the crate and the floor.  Draw a free-body diagram and use it to find:  the weight  the normal force (Fn)  the force of friction (Ff)  Find the coefficient of friction.  Answer: s = 0.32
  48. 48. Classroom Practice Problem  A student attaches a rope to a 20.0 kg box of books. He pulls with a force of 90.0 N at an angle of 30.0˚ with the horizontal. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the sidewalk is 0.500. Find the magnitude of the acceleration of the box. – Start with a free-body diagram. – Determine the net force. – Find the acceleration. • Answer: a = 0.12 m/s2
  49. 49. + The Four Fundamental Forces  Electromagnetic  Strong nuclear force  Caused by  The strongest force interactions between  Short range protons and electrons  Produces friction  Weak nuclear force  Short range  Gravitational  The weakest force
  50. 50. + Now what do you think?  How do the quantities weight and mass differ from each other?  Which of the following terms is most closely related to the term friction?  Heat, energy, force, velocity  Explain the relationship.
  51. 51. + Example  Derek Leaves his physics book on top of a drafting table that is inclined at a 35° angle. The free body diagram shows the forces. F table-on-book = 18N F friction= 11N F gravity-on-book = 22N
  52. 52. + Example  Given:  F table-on-book = 18N  F gravity-on-book = 22N Y  F friction= 11N  F net =?? 18N 11N X 22N
  53. 53. + Example  What can I do now?? Y  Make a triangle!!!  Now we can figure out vector components, Meaning the sides and unknown angle  θ X 35° 22N
  54. 54. + Example X = Fgcosθ  θ= 180-90-35 X = (22N) cos 55°  θ= 55° X = 13N  Cos θ=x Y = Fg sin θ F gravity Y = (22N) sin 55°  Sinθ=y Y = 18N F gravity
  55. 55. + Example  X- axis  Y- axis  Fnet = Fa + F f  Fnet = F n + Fg
  56. 56. + Example  A man is pulling his dog with a force of 70N directed at an angle of 30° to the horizontal. Find the x and y components of this force.  As an apple falls, the gravitational force on the apple is 2.25N down, and the force of the wind on the apple is 1.05N right. Find the magnitude and direction of the net force.
  57. 57. Equilibrium  The state in which the net force is zero.  All forces are balanced.  Object is at rest or travels with constant velocity  In the diagram, the bob on the fishing line is in equilibrium.  The forces cancel each other.  If either force changes, acceleration will occur.
  58. 58. + Classroom Practice Problem  An agricultural student is designing a support system to keep a tree upright. Two wires have been attached to the tree and placed at right angles to each other (parallel to the ground). One wire exerts a force of 30.0 N and the other exerts a force of 40.0 N. Determine where to place a third wire and how much force it should exert so that the net force on the tree is zero.  Answer: 50.0 N at 143° from the 40.0 N force

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