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Electric Forces and Fields
Chapter 16
Pg.
+




16.1 Electric Charge
+
    What do you think?

    •   In the top picture, the girl has rubbed the
        balloon on her hair, and now there i...
+
    What do you think?

    •   Suppose that after this balloon is rubbed against the
        girl’s hair, it is held ag...
+
    Electric Charge


     Thereare two types of
     charge, positive and
     negative.
     Like    charges repel.
...
+
    Properties of Electric Charge


    Work  best on dry days because
     excessive moisture in the air can
     prov...
+
    Transferring Electric Charge

     Atomshave smaller particles called protons (+
     charge), neutrons, and electr...
+
    Transferring Electric Charge

     When  rubbing a balloon on your hair,
     electrons are attracted to the balloo...
+
    Conductors and Insulators

       What is meant by the term        Conductors allow electrons to
        electrica...
+
    Charging by Contact

     Bothinsulators and conductors can be
     charged by contact.
      Rubbing   two materi...
+
    Charging by Induction

                       A chargedrod is held near
                       a metal sphere. Why ...
+
    Charging by Induction

 The    conductor connecting
    the sphere to ground is
    removed. What type of net
    c...
+
    Surface Charges
 Why    does a charged balloon stick to
    the wall?
 A positive    surface charge is induced on
...
+
    Now what do you think?

    •   In the top picture, the girl has rubbed
        the balloon on her hair, and now the...
+
    Now what do you think?

    •   Suppose that after this balloon is rubbed against the
        girl’s hair, it is hel...
+




16.2 Electric Force
+
                What do you think?

    •   Electric forces and gravitational forces are both
        field forces. Two ...
+ Coulomb’s Law
  The force between two charged particles
  depends on the amount of charge and on the
  distance between...
+
    Coulomb’s Law




     Use  the known units for q, r, and F to determine
     the units of kc.
      kc = 8.99 109...
+ Classroom Practice Problem

  The electron and proton in a hydrogen atom
  are separated, on the average, a distance of...
+ Classroom Practice Problem


              q1q2
  Fe      kc ( 2 )
               r
                    ( 1.6 x10 19 )(1...
+
    Classroom Practice Problem


                me m p
    Fg      G          2
                   r
                  ...
+
    Classroom Practice Problem

     The electric force is more than 1039 times
     greater than the gravitational for...
+
    Electric Force

     Like   gravity, the electric force is a field force.
     Similarities
      Both   forces a...
+
    Coulomb’s Apparatus


                      Coulomb  developed his
                      law using a torsion
      ...
+
         Now what do you think?
 Electric    forces and gravitational forces are both
    field forces. Two charged par...
+




16.3 The Electric Field
+
            What do you think?

    •   In the chapter “Circular Motion and
        Gravitation,” you learned about the
...
+
         What do you think?

• Make a sketch of the
  “E” field for each
  charge or combination
  of charges.
    – How...
+
    Electric Field Strength
 Electric fields (E) have magnitude and direction.
  The direction is defined as the direc...
+
    Test Charges
     A small test charge will• If the test charge (q0) is large,
     not significantly affect   it wi...
+
    Electric Field Strength
 Combine     Coulomb’s law withthe definition of electric field
    to derive an equation f...
+ Sample Electric Field Strengths
+
    Electric Field Lines - Rules

     Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around
     the charge shown.
+
    Electric Field Lines - Rules

     Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around
     the charge shown.
+
    Electric Field Lines - Rules




 Applythe above rules
 and sketch the E field
 around the charge
 combination show...
+
    Electric Field Lines - Rules
+
    Electric Field Lines - Rules




     Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around
     the charge combinatio...
+
    Electric Field Lines - Rules
+
    Electrostatic Equilibrium

 Electrostatic  equilibrium occurs in conductors when no
    net motion of charges exist...
+
             Now what do you think?

    •   What is an electric field?
    •   When sketching electric fields, what inf...
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Electric Forces and Fields Slide 1 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 2 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 3 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 4 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 5 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 6 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 7 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 8 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 9 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 10 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 11 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 12 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 13 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 14 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 15 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 16 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 17 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 18 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 19 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 20 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 21 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 22 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 23 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 24 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 25 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 26 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 27 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 28 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 29 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 30 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 31 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 32 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 33 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 34 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 35 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 36 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 37 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 38 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 39 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 40 Electric Forces and Fields Slide 41
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Electric Forces and Fields

  1. 1. + Electric Forces and Fields Chapter 16 Pg.
  2. 2. + 16.1 Electric Charge
  3. 3. + What do you think? • In the top picture, the girl has rubbed the balloon on her hair, and now there is a force of attraction between them. Normally, a balloon and hair would not attract each other. • What happened to each to produce this force? • In the lower picture, the two balloons are repelling each other. • How was this force of repulsion produced?
  4. 4. + What do you think? • Suppose that after this balloon is rubbed against the girl’s hair, it is held against the wall. It will be attracted to the wall and stick to it. • Explain why the balloon is attracted to the wall. • Why does it eventually fall?
  5. 5. + Electric Charge  Thereare two types of charge, positive and negative.  Like charges repel.  Positive and positive  Negative and negative  The two balloons  Opposite charges attract.  Positive and negative  The balloon and the hair.
  6. 6. + Properties of Electric Charge Work best on dry days because excessive moisture in the air can provide a pathway for charge to leak off a charged object.
  7. 7. + Transferring Electric Charge  Atomshave smaller particles called protons (+ charge), neutrons, and electrons (- charge).  Number of protons = number of electrons  Atoms are neutral (no net charge).  Electronsare easily transferred from one atom to another.  Protons and neutrons remain in nearly fixed positions.
  8. 8. + Transferring Electric Charge  When rubbing a balloon on your hair, electrons are attracted to the balloon and transfer.  The balloon is left with excess electrons (-charge).  The hair is left with an equal excess of protons (+charge).
  9. 9. + Conductors and Insulators  What is meant by the term  Conductors allow electrons to electrical conductor? flow freely through them.  Provide a few examples.  Silver, copper, aluminum, and other metals  Electrons do not flow freely  What is meant by the term though insulators. electrical insulator?  Plastic, rubber, glass  Provide a few examples.  Outer electrons in metals are  Why do conductors and loosely bound to the nucleus insulators behave and relatively free to move. differently?
  10. 10. + Charging by Contact  Bothinsulators and conductors can be charged by contact.  Rubbing two materials together results in a transfer of electrons.  When charging metal, the charge may move through your body into the ground.  The metal and your body are conductors, so the charge moves through them.  You must hold the conductor with an insulating material, such as rubber gloves, to keep the charge on the metal.
  11. 11. + Charging by Induction  A chargedrod is held near a metal sphere. Why do the charges in the metal arrange themselves as shown?  The metal sphere is connected to the ground with a conductor. Why did some of the electrons move off the sphere?
  12. 12. + Charging by Induction  The conductor connecting the sphere to ground is removed. What type of net charge does the sphere now possess?  The negatively charged rod is removed. Why do the charges move into the positions shown?
  13. 13. + Surface Charges  Why does a charged balloon stick to the wall?  A positive surface charge is induced on the wall by the negatively-charged balloon.  Electrons shift within atoms due to attraction or repulsion.  The insulator does not have a net charge.  The diagram shows the opposite case.  Why can a charged comb pick up little pieces of paper?
  14. 14. + Now what do you think? • In the top picture, the girl has rubbed the balloon on her hair, and now there is a force of attraction between them. Normally, a balloon and hair would not attract each other. • What happened to each to produce this force? • In the lower picture, the two balloons are repelling each other. • How was this force of repulsion produced?
  15. 15. + Now what do you think? • Suppose that after this balloon is rubbed against the girl’s hair, it is held against the wall. It will be attracted to the wall and stick to it. • Explain why the balloon is attracted to the wall. • Why does it eventually fall?
  16. 16. + 16.2 Electric Force
  17. 17. + What do you think? • Electric forces and gravitational forces are both field forces. Two charged particles would feel the effects of both fields. Imagine two electrons attracting each other due to the gravitational force and repelling each other due to the electrostatic force. • Which force is greater? • Is one slightly greater or much greater than the other, or are they about the same? • What evidence exists to support your answer?
  18. 18. + Coulomb’s Law  The force between two charged particles depends on the amount of charge and on the distance between them.  Force has a direct relationship with both charges.  Force has an inverse square relationship with distance.
  19. 19. + Coulomb’s Law  Use the known units for q, r, and F to determine the units of kc.  kc = 8.99 109 N•m2/C2  Thedistance (r) is measured from center to center for spherical charge distributions.
  20. 20. + Classroom Practice Problem  The electron and proton in a hydrogen atom are separated, on the average, a distance of about 5.3 10-11 m. Find the magnitude of both the gravitational force and the electric force acting between them.  r= 5.3 x 10-11 qe= -1.60 x 10-19  kc= 8.99 x 109 qp= 1.60 x 10-19  me= 9.109 x 10-31 G= 6.673 x 10 -11  mp= 1.63 x 10-27
  21. 21. + Classroom Practice Problem q1q2 Fe kc ( 2 ) r ( 1.6 x10 19 )(1.6 x10 19 ) Fe (8.99 x109 ) (5.3x10 11 )2  Fe = -8.2 10-8 N
  22. 22. + Classroom Practice Problem me m p Fg G 2 r 11 (9.109 x10 31 )(1.63x10 27 ) Fg (6.673x10 ) (5.3x10 11 )2  Fg = 3.6 10-47 N
  23. 23. + Classroom Practice Problem  The electric force is more than 1039 times greater than the gravitational force.  Atoms and molecules are held together by electric forces. Gravity has little effect.
  24. 24. + Electric Force  Like gravity, the electric force is a field force.  Similarities  Both forces are related to distance in the same way.  Differences  Two types of charge and only one type of mass  Electric forces can attract or repel while gravity only attracts.  Electric forces are far stronger than gravitational forces.
  25. 25. + Coulomb’s Apparatus  Coulomb developed his law using a torsion balance like that shown.  He measured the force between the two charged spheres by the amount of twisting in the wire.
  26. 26. + Now what do you think?  Electric forces and gravitational forces are both field forces. Two charged particles would feel the effects of both fields. Imagine two electrons attracting each other due to the gravitational force and repelling each other due to the electrostatic force.  Which force is greater?  Is one slightly greater or much greater than the other, or are they about the same?  What evidence exists to support your answer?
  27. 27. + 16.3 The Electric Field
  28. 28. + What do you think? • In the chapter “Circular Motion and Gravitation,” you learned about the gravitational field (g). The diagram shows the “g” field around Earth. • In this section, we will study the electric field (E) around charged particles. On the next slide are three different diagrams. Make a sketch of the “E” field for each charge or combination of charges.
  29. 29. + What do you think? • Make a sketch of the “E” field for each charge or combination of charges. – How are your sketches similar? – How are they different? – Explain.
  30. 30. + Electric Field Strength  Electric fields (E) have magnitude and direction.  The direction is defined as the direction of the force on a small, positive test charge (q0) placed in the field caused by Q. Felectric  The magnitude of the field is defined as E the force per unit charge on q0. q0
  31. 31. + Test Charges  A small test charge will• If the test charge (q0) is large, not significantly affect it will affect the way the the field. charges are distributed on the charged conductor. – This would change the field around the conductor. • Test charges will always be considered small enough to have no effect on the field.
  32. 32. + Electric Field Strength  Combine Coulomb’s law withthe definition of electric field to derive an equation for E due to a point charge. Felectric qq0  SI unit: N/C E kC 2 q0 r q0  The field strength does not depend on the test charge.
  33. 33. + Sample Electric Field Strengths
  34. 34. + Electric Field Lines - Rules  Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around the charge shown.
  35. 35. + Electric Field Lines - Rules  Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around the charge shown.
  36. 36. + Electric Field Lines - Rules  Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around the charge combination shown.
  37. 37. + Electric Field Lines - Rules
  38. 38. + Electric Field Lines - Rules  Applythe above rules and sketch the E field around the charge combination shown.
  39. 39. + Electric Field Lines - Rules
  40. 40. + Electrostatic Equilibrium  Electrostatic equilibrium occurs in conductors when no net motion of charges exists within the conductor.  Charges in a conductor are free to move, but are not moving when equilibrium exists.  The rules below result from this fact.
  41. 41. + Now what do you think? • What is an electric field? • When sketching electric fields, what information is conveyed by the direction of the field lines? • When sketching electric fields, what information is conveyed by the density of the field lines? • Why must electric field lines just outside a conductor be perpendicular to the conductor?
  • SkAakhibAakhib

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