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Non ferrous alloys

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Non ferrous alloys

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Non ferrous alloys

  1. 1. SHONE JOHN
  2. 2.  Non ferrous alloys are alloys that are the by products of non ferrous metals such as aluminium, cobalt, lead, magnesium, titanium and zinc. By definition, a non ferrous alloy is an alloy that does not intentionally contain iron. In general, non ferrous alloys are invested with non metallic properties, have higher melting point and better strength. These properties make them a favoured choice for several commercial and non commercial uses, including automobile and aircraft parts, communication equipment, water valves, musical instruments and the manufacturing of flammables and explosive.
  3. 3.  Pure copper has the best electrical and thermal conductivity of any commercial metal. Today, over half of the copper produced is used in electrical and electronic applications and this leads to a convenient classification of the types of copper into electrical (high conductivity) and non-electrical (engineering)
  4. 4.  Copper’s performance can be expanded to suit many industrial applications. This is achieved by alloying: making a solid material out of two or more different metals. By combining copper with other metals, alloys can be made to fit almost any application.
  5. 5.  Brass is the generic term for a range of copper-zinc alloys with differing combinations of properties, including strength, machinability, ductility, wear- resistance, hardness, colour, antimicrobial, electrical and thermal conductivity, and corrosion-resistance.
  6. 6.  Bronze alloys are made from copper and tin, and were the first to be developed about four thousand years ago. They were so important that they led to a period in time being named the Bronze Age
  7. 7.  Gun metals are alloys of copper with tin, zinc and lead and have been used for at least 2000 years due to their ease of casting and good strength and corrosion resistance
  8. 8.  Copper-nickel alloys have excellent resistance to marine corrosion and biofouling. The addition of nickel to copper improves strength and corrosion resistance, but good ductility is retained.
  9. 9.  Nickel silver alloys are made from copper, nickel and zinc, and can be regarded as special brasses. They have an attractive silvery appearance rather than the typical brassy colour.
  10. 10.  Beryllium copper is the hardest and strongest of any copper alloy, in the fully heat treated and cold worked condition. It is similar in mechanical properties to many high strength alloy steels but, compared to steels, it has better corrosion resistance
  11. 11. What is a microstructure? Metals are crystalline when in the solid form. The crystal structure of a solid metal refers to the internal structure or arrangement of the atoms in an ordered, repeating, three dimensional pattern. Normal metallic objects are polycrystalline, which means they consist of an aggregate of many very small crystals. These crystals are called grains. Some metallic objects, such as castings, have very large grains that can be resolved with the naked eye and these structures are referred to as macrostructures. Typically, the grains of a metal object are very small, and can not be viewed with the naked eye. The structural features of the small grains are observed using an optical microscope or metallograph, or an electron microscope, at magnifications greater than 100 times. Structures requiring this range of magnification for their examination are called microstructures.
  12. 12.  Copper is a reddish metal,  is very ductile  Malleable  has high electrical and heat conductivity.  It is used as a major element in hundreds of alloys.  it is very soft,  it is very difficult to machine due to its high ductility
  13. 13.  The principal use of commercially pure copper is in the electrical industry where it is made into wire or other such conductors.  It is also used in the manufacture of nonferrous alloys such as brass, bronze, and Monel metal.  Typical copper products are  sheet roofing,  cartridge cases,  bushings,  wire,  bearings,  and statues.  Used in Ornament making
  14. 14. Copper application areas cover a wide variety of different disciplines  Architecture application of copper and copper alloy materials in all aspects of architecture, both exterior and interior ...  Automotive Copper is an essential component of many of the latest design elements in today's cars.  Electrical Copper's high conductivity makes it the ideal material in a wide variety of electical applications including:  Electrical Energy Efficiency  Power Quality  Building Wire

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