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INFORMATION
  LITERACY
  Essential Skills for
 Students and Teachers
   In the 21st Century
Overview
 A weekday edition of the New York Times
  contains more information in it than the
  average 17th century perso...
Overview
 The TI-86 calculators used by our students
  in their math classes have more than twice
  the raw computing pow...
So What . . . !?!?
   So what does that mean to me and my
    students?

    – In our world of bigger, faster, more is be...
Therefore, Today we are going to . . .
 Look  at the “Big 6” information
  literacy model.
 Identify resources that are ...
What is the Big 6?
 The Big6 is an information literacy model.
 Some people call it a metacognitive scaffold,
  or an in...
What is the Big 6 Framework?
   1. Task Definition
     – 1.1 Define the information problem
     – 1.2 Identify informat...
What is the Big 6 Framework?
   4. Use of Information
     – 4.1 Engage the information in a source
        • (e.g., read...
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Big6

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Big6

  1. 1. INFORMATION LITERACY Essential Skills for Students and Teachers In the 21st Century
  2. 2. Overview  A weekday edition of the New York Times contains more information in it than the average 17th century person would have come across in their entire lifetime.  It is estimated that there were 1.3 million web pages in 1995 and over 1 billion at the turn of the century. (1 trillion by 2010?)  Using common technologies today an average person can produce professional looking print quality publications and mass market them on the internet.
  3. 3. Overview  The TI-86 calculators used by our students in their math classes have more than twice the raw computing power than the main- frame computers used to land the first lunar module.  Using fiber optic technology, the entire contents of the Library of Congress could be transmitted from Washington D.C. to San Francisco in a matter of minutes.
  4. 4. So What . . . !?!?  So what does that mean to me and my students? – In our world of bigger, faster, more is better . . . we need to teach our students how sift through the chaff and find the information they need. – There are systematic ways to acquire, select and process information. – We have several resources available to us to help our students learn how to process information
  5. 5. Therefore, Today we are going to . . .  Look at the “Big 6” information literacy model.  Identify resources that are available to help students identify and locate “quality” information.  Spend time investigating these resources.
  6. 6. What is the Big 6?  The Big6 is an information literacy model.  Some people call it a metacognitive scaffold, or an information problem solving strategy.  It is an approach to teaching information processing and technology skills.  When you apply the Big6 steps, you have an essential framework to approach any information-based question.
  7. 7. What is the Big 6 Framework?  1. Task Definition – 1.1 Define the information problem – 1.2 Identify information needed in order to complete the task (to solve the information problem)  2. Information Seeking Strategies – 2.1 Determine the range of possible sources (brainstorm) – 2.2 Evaluate the different possible sources to determine priorities (select the best sources)  3. Location and Access – 3.1 Locate sources (intellectually and physically) – 3.2 Find information within sources
  8. 8. What is the Big 6 Framework?  4. Use of Information – 4.1 Engage the information in a source • (e.g., read, hear, view, touch) – 4.2 Extract relevant information from a source  5. Synthesis – 5.1 Organize information from multiple sources – 5.2 Present the information  6. Evaluation – 6.1 Judge the product (effectiveness) – 6.2 Judge the information problem-solving process (efficiency)

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