Financing Freedom - Section One 0.3

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This is the final draft of section one of the tutorial. Of course, I need to practice the timing to see where each 30 minute section takes.

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Financing Freedom - Section One 0.3

  1. 1. How to organize and fund free culture projects Kevin Shockey Founder, Mis Tribus
  2. 2. What? Free culture projects often fail due to a lack of resources.
  3. 3. So What? By focusing on raising funds, a project can increase its chances of survival
  4. 4. Why m e? Computer Science, Math, Financials, and Software Development
  5. 5. Why now? Declining interest in FLOSS Lingering confusion surrounding free software Lack of unity, more division Cloud computing and proprietary platforms, like iOS, are: - Reducing awareness of FLOSS foundations - Reducing interest with a superior user experience
  6. 6. OReilly Hom e Page (06/ 16/ 2012)
  7. 7. Disclaimer Some of this class Is based on theories Im currently researching And using
  8. 8. Tutorial as a Startup Financing Freedom - “How to organize and fund free culture projects” - Slides - Handout - eBook Supporting Materials - Background - Data - Illustrations (Graphs) - Vision for Maximum Strategy Community
  9. 9. So far...Startup Progress Funding Free Culture: - Blog: news.financingfreedom.com - Homepage: www.financingfreedom.com - @_ff12 - Tumblr: FundingFreeCulture.Tumblr.com One Blogger post triggers: - 3 Automated tweets on 3 different accounts - Twitter - Linked In - Financing Freedom Page on Facebook
  10. 10. Assum ptions Free Culture Project Execution Project Funding
  11. 11. Free Culture Assum ptions Free culture projects often fail - Never shipping - Unable to attract a community Division makes free culture weaker - Contributors must choose - Only able to sustain two or three projects
  12. 12. “Free” Assum ptions Ambiguiety between free and open source software In many cases there is a an unequal value transaction: - Many use “free” software - Few look for ways to give back to the community - Volunteer - Recommendations - Donations - Merchandise - Services
  13. 13. State of FLOSS? Projects in emergent, growth, & maturity stages State is Mixed - Enterprise recognition - Limited user recognition/support - Finances (resources) are limited (often to just one person)
  14. 14. Top 10 FLOSS Hall of Fam e1. Linux Kernel2. GNU Utilities & Compilers3. Ubuntu4. BSD5. Samba (Top 10 Open Source Hall of Famers. (2009). http://mstrb.us/zjn6zK)
  15. 15. Top 10 FLOSS Hall of Fam e6. MySQL7. BIND8. SendMail9. OpenSSH & OpenSSL10. Apache
  16. 16. Measuring FLOSS Through search, Google Trends Through search, Google Scholar Through investigation, Mining SourceForge.net Repository
  17. 17. Search is relative Search is a simulation; - By measuring “reality” we affect reality - It is a proxy, - We humanely can not understand the math involved - Artificial intelligence
  18. 18. What SEO Tells Us Many Thanks to Stephen OGrady and his SEO research, which he shared: “The State of Open Source: Startup, Growth, Maturity or Decline?”
  19. 19. General trends for mature projects - Linux
  20. 20. Apache
  21. 21. MySQL
  22. 22. PHP
  23. 23. Open Source
  24. 24. GPL
  25. 25. Em erging Technologies Dom inated by FLOSS – LinuxCloud
  26. 26. NoSQL
  27. 27. Hadoop
  28. 28. Google Scholar Advanced Search Parameters - “Open Source” exact phrase all in title - “Engineering, Computer Science, and Mathematics” subject area - Year to Year (eg; 2012 to 2012, 2011 to 2011, etc.)
  29. 29. Open Source Academic Papers by Year900800700600500 Direct Results400300200100 0 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997
  30. 30. “Open Source” vs “Free Software” (since 1983)900800700600500400300200100 Free Software Results Open Source Results 0 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983
  31. 31. Academ ic Paper Analysis Growth reversed in 2011, but 2012 will show new growth Free software has not been researched much - Out-published by a margin of 5 to 1 by open source.
  32. 32. Academ ic Paper Questions Has research on “open source peaked? Why isnt anyone researching “free software?” Has “open source” obscured the importance of free software?
  33. 33. SourceForge Research Data Archive (SRDA) Many tables archived from February 2005 to present Data includes any churn in the number of active users, projects, messages, etc. Observations
  34. 34. Monthly additions of users is slowing down
  35. 35. User base is STILL growing - Just over 3 million users
  36. 36. Sharp increase in the number of projects
  37. 37. Num ber of packages is also up.
  38. 38. Num ber of releases are down
  39. 39. Num ber of files are down.
  40. 40. Downloads are generally rising - Extreme variances are unexplained
  41. 41. 3.6 Million in January 2009 *
  42. 42. Is GitHub Eating all of SourceForges Candy?
  43. 43. SourceForge and GitHub Sm ackdown Three comparisons - Number of Users - Number of Academic Papers - Number of Repositories Round One - Number of Users: - SF (3 Million to 1.6 Million) Round Two – Academic papers - SF (195 to 8) Round Three – Repositories - No correlation for repositories
  44. 44. Project Ex ecution Assumptions Most projects end in failure A successful project organization has emerged FLOSS projects are similar to startups Execution is achieved through testing assumptions
  45. 45. Open Source Failure A project that is unable to grow a community beyond the founder. A project that fails to ship anything. Abandoned projects
  46. 46. Open Source Failure A project that is unable to grow a community beyond the founder. A project that fails to ship anything. Abandoned projects...when either of the 1 two conditions reoccurs st
  47. 47. SourceForge Projects 324,000 projects 268,554 projects with only 1 developer (83%) 44,446 “viable” projects (14%)
  48. 48. Developers Per Project
  49. 49. Open Source Success Constant and synchronous communication Consistency in methodological development approach Geographical dispersion management through an extensive testing culture FLOSSD experience in accepting and handling the environmental limitations
  50. 50. Critical Success Factors Obligatory use of project methodology An extensive testing culture (Lean Startup) - Build Measure Learn or your competition will Irrelevance is your enemy - Mastery of Internet and Social Media marketing Create, nuture, and manage a viable community
  51. 51. An Infinite Marketplace Thousands of new OSS projects every month Thousands of new apps on Android and Apple A hundred thousand new e-Books Millions of social media updates - Photos - Videos - Blog entries
  52. 52. Irrelevance is Your Enem y

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