Finding ChemistryNeutralizing the Differences between Technical Writing                               and Instructional De...
Overview Overview – An introduction to how technical writing  skills translate well to instructional design. Objectives ...
Technical Writing Myths• Tech writers spend all their time writing• Everyone can write; so companies don’t need tech  writ...
Instructional DesignMyths• You don’t need to understand technology• You don’t need to know graphic design tools• No more m...
Final Myth
Calculate the Potential… Have you ever imagined the possibility that your  technical writing skills might easily transfer ...
Foundational TheoryCan technical writers be instructional designers?
Technical Writing DescriptionSample job descriptions for a technical writer from www.stateuniversity.comTechnical writers ...
Instructional Design Description                                   Sample job descriptions for an                         ...
ID & Tech Writer Combination         Sample job descriptions for a Technical Communicator                     from www.sta...
A Covalent Bond
Tech Writer DeliverablesLet’s look at the types of deliverables that technical writers create.
ID Deliverables   Can you think ofdeliverables specific to instructional design?
Approach to EachDifferences between the two.                           Or… are there?
Compare Formulas
An ExperimentLet’s do ademonstration…
The Science Behind the Magic                  …Tools of the                    Trade
Tools Used by Each TradeTechnical Writing   Instructional Design
Let’s Make Slime! Together, we will come up with the procedural              steps to make slime.
Technical Writing Steps Analyze Organize Present
Instructional Design Steps A    Analyze D    Design D    Develop  I   Implement E    Evaluate
Instructional Design Example Used ADDIE steps to create instruction using           Microsoft PowerPoint.
Creating Slime    Click here to begin
ObjectivesAt the end of this module you will be able to:    Identify the tools needed to make slime.    Create slime using...
Step 1First, make sure you have the tools necessary to complete theprocedure.Click each tool to see a description.        ...
Step 2Begin by pouring 4 ounces of school glue into an emptycanister.Click the school glue bottle now.                    ...
Step 3Next you need to add 4 ounces of water to the glass of glue.Click the glass of water now.                           ...
Step 4Add the three drops of the food coloring of your choice.Click the food coloring now.                                ...
Step 5In a separate container, mix one cup of water with oneteaspoon of borax powder.Add the mixture to the glue/water mix...
Step 6Now stir the solution to make sure it is evenly mixed. Watch aswe do this for you.                         Click Nex...
Congratulations!You’ve successfully learned how to create slime.If you’d like to view the simulation again, click here.Whe...
Knowledge CheckLet’s check your knowledge. Put each of the steps listedin the correct order.1. Be sure you have the correc...
Our View of ID & Tech Writing
When I grow up I want to be…
Making the Transition Books                         Online forums and Help Online Resources                  • Captivat...
Questions?
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Technical Writing meets Instructional Design

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Sharon Jendrisak and Jennifer Beaujon talk about how technical writing and
instructional design are not as different as they appear to be, and
attendees will hear about a company that understands how a person
can perform both functions effectively. We will also talk about how to
transition between technical writing and instructional design.

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  • Course Overview - Give the big picture of the subject: “The purpose of this course is…”Course Objectives – “After completing this course, participants should be able to…”Audience Benefits (WIIFM?)How will this help me in my job situation?What benefits will I gain?What consequences will I avoid?
  • “The greatest myth is that technical writers cannot be instructional designers.”
  • Jennifer’s part
  • [Have audience raise hands]How many of you only see yourself as a technical writer? How many of you see yourself as both a technical writer and instructional designer?[Whiteboard answers]Can someone describe for me what a technical writer does?How about an instructional designer?
  • Read job description out loud.
  • Read job description out loud.
  • Ask audience who found this description interesting – and why.Hand out pop rocks to volunteers.
  • Now how many people think they’re only a technical writer?How many believe they are both?
  • Types of deliverables in technical writing – “Who can tell me one?”[Have audience say deliverables – write them on whiteboard]
  • “What kind of deliverables do you think an instructional designer creates?”[Have audience say deliverables – write them on whiteboard]
  • “So let’s briefly go over the differences in the output of these two.”[Click for 1st animation]“How many of you noticed that you actually just witnessed the same information being presented to you in two different formats?”[Click for 2nd animation]“Your handout was created in Microsoft Word, and used technical writing skills. The presentation portion used instructional design skills to develop an instructor-led exercise to be used in a classroom training session.”
  • [Click right arrow to bring up Picture #1]The difference between technical writing and instructional design is really just a matter of thinking of things in a different way.[Click for Picture #2]As a technical writer you determine what information you need to convey, who needs the information, how you are going to provide the information, and if the information is clear enough for the audience to follow and complete.[Click for Picture #3]As an instructional designer, you also determine what information to convey, who needs the information, and how you’re going to provide the information. The difference is the end result.[Click for Picture #4]The instructional designer must develop something that will teach the audience so they can do the action on their own at a later time.[Click for Picture #5]That’s not to say someone may read installation instructions and then be able to install the software without referring to the instructions again. That does happen, but that’s not the intent of installation instructions.[Click for Picture #6]With instructional design, the intent is for the audience to learn something – that is why the audience is usually referred to as the learners or participants.
  • “Let’s look at an example to demonstrate this.”[Hand out pipe cleaners to the audience. Ask a volunteer to explain to the audience how to make an H2O molecule out of the pipe cleaner. The audience should do this with the volunteer.]“Next, I’ll explain how to make an H2O molecule using instructional design techniques. Instructional design often uses the Tell, Show, Do, Review process. Don’t do anything with your pipe cleaners yet.”[Show how and explain how to make the H2O molecule.]“Okay, pick up your pipe cleaner and follow along.”[Walk through making the molecule.]“Now take it apart and try it on your own. When you are done, hold them up.”[Provide feedback.]“Another part of instructional design is providing feedback. Did you notice I did that as people held up their pipe cleaners? Sharon’s going to go over some of the tools you’re familiar with as a tech writer and some that are common to instructional designers.”
  • Jennifer: “Sharon’s going to go over some of the tools you’re familiar with as a tech writer and some that are common to instructional designers.”Sharon: “There are quite a few tools used by each trade, and we’ll really only touch on some of them in tonight’s discussion. Let’s talk first about some of the tools used in technical writing.”“So you can follow along, I’m going to pass out a handout of some of the more popular tools used by each trade.” [Move to next slide.]**Dispense handouts – and go over points with audience.
  • Go over the handout with participants.
  • Answers in order:1, 2, 3, 5, 4, 6, 7.“Does anyone have questions about the differences and similarities between technical writing and instructional design?”“Next, Jennifer will give you some suggestions on how to get into the instructional design field.”
  • “I hope everyone’s starting to understand that just because you are a technical writer doesn’t mean you can’t be an instructional designer. Everyone here has the potential to learn and to be an instructional designer.”“Let’s be honest. It’s not like we’re toll booth operators and decide we also want to be astronauts. Tech writers and IDs are conveyers of information. Let’s see if you can identify when tech writing or instructional design should be used.”
  • How many of you actually wanted to be a technical writer when you grew up – you went to college with the idea of becoming a technical writer when you graduated?“If you didn’t go to school to be a technical writer, then how did you learn it?”[Ask people to explain around the room.]“Sharon and I both explained our backgrounds. I’m sure you noticed that neither one of use started out as a technical writer or instructional designer, yet here we are. On any given day Sharon may start by writing a maintenance manual for a printing press and end her day programming an interactive online course about selling faucets. These are skills that we learned.”“The majority of people working at Radcom can create both technical documentation and instructional design projects, but they did not start here with this ability. Radcom believes that people who show strong writing skills and the willingness and ability to learn new skills and software can learn to do both instructional design and technical writing well. We have been verysuccessful in developing both technical writers and instructional designers.”
  • “If you remember my experience, I learned by editing first and then taking an online course. I have helped others develop intoinstructional designers. Other ways people have learned are through books, classes, and always lots of practice.”“Here are some good resources for learning instructional design…”
  • Ask participants if they have any questions. [Click right arrow to bring up question mark logo]Answer questions as needed.Mention sell sheets and class schedule (if applicable) on table if they’re interested. Like Captivate, Lectora, Blogs, Rapid eLearning, etc.
  • Technical Writing meets Instructional Design

    1. 1. Finding ChemistryNeutralizing the Differences between Technical Writing and Instructional Design Jennifer Beaujon jbeaujon@radcomservices.com Sharon Jendrisak jendriss@gojo.com
    2. 2. Overview Overview – An introduction to how technical writing skills translate well to instructional design. Objectives / Agenda  Explore myths about Technical Writing and Instructional Design  Technical Writing and Instructional Design job descriptions – comparison  Compare deliverables  Elemental tools of each trade  Methodologies  Making the transition
    3. 3. Technical Writing Myths• Tech writers spend all their time writing• Everyone can write; so companies don’t need tech writers• You don’t need to be creative in tech writing
    4. 4. Instructional DesignMyths• You don’t need to understand technology• You don’t need to know graphic design tools• No more manuals!• Once you’ve designed the project, your job is done
    5. 5. Final Myth
    6. 6. Calculate the Potential… Have you ever imagined the possibility that your technical writing skills might easily transfer to instructional design?
    7. 7. Foundational TheoryCan technical writers be instructional designers?
    8. 8. Technical Writing DescriptionSample job descriptions for a technical writer from www.stateuniversity.comTechnical writers explain in simple language scientific andtechnical ideas that are difficult for the average reader tounderstand.
    9. 9. Instructional Design Description Sample job descriptions for an instructional designer from www.stateuniversity.com When working on a project for a client, instructional designers assume the role of a teacher. They plan the overall instructional flow of the program and see that content is both appropriately and clearly communicated. IDs must be familiar not only with the content to be learned and the level of the learner, but also with a computer’s means of presenting information and interacting with users.
    10. 10. ID & Tech Writer Combination Sample job descriptions for a Technical Communicator from www.stateuniversity.com“Develop and design instructional and informational tools needed toassure safe, appropriate, and effective use of science and technology,intellectual property, and manufactured products and services.Combine multimedia knowledge and strong communication skills withtechnical expertise to educate across the entire spectrum of users’abilities, technical experience, and visual and auditory capabilities.”
    11. 11. A Covalent Bond
    12. 12. Tech Writer DeliverablesLet’s look at the types of deliverables that technical writers create.
    13. 13. ID Deliverables Can you think ofdeliverables specific to instructional design?
    14. 14. Approach to EachDifferences between the two. Or… are there?
    15. 15. Compare Formulas
    16. 16. An ExperimentLet’s do ademonstration…
    17. 17. The Science Behind the Magic …Tools of the Trade
    18. 18. Tools Used by Each TradeTechnical Writing Instructional Design
    19. 19. Let’s Make Slime! Together, we will come up with the procedural steps to make slime.
    20. 20. Technical Writing Steps Analyze Organize Present
    21. 21. Instructional Design Steps A Analyze D Design D Develop I Implement E Evaluate
    22. 22. Instructional Design Example Used ADDIE steps to create instruction using Microsoft PowerPoint.
    23. 23. Creating Slime Click here to begin
    24. 24. ObjectivesAt the end of this module you will be able to: Identify the tools needed to make slime. Create slime using household items.
    25. 25. Step 1First, make sure you have the tools necessary to complete theprocedure.Click each tool to see a description. 4 ounces 4 ounces + 1 1 teaspoon 3 drops Food School Glue cup Water Borax coloring Click Next to continue.
    26. 26. Step 2Begin by pouring 4 ounces of school glue into an emptycanister.Click the school glue bottle now. Good job! Click the Next button to continue.
    27. 27. Step 3Next you need to add 4 ounces of water to the glass of glue.Click the glass of water now. That’s right! Click the Next button to continue.
    28. 28. Step 4Add the three drops of the food coloring of your choice.Click the food coloring now. That’s right! Click the Next button to continue. Click Next to continue.
    29. 29. Step 5In a separate container, mix one cup of water with oneteaspoon of borax powder.Add the mixture to the glue/water mixture. Click Next to continue.
    30. 30. Step 6Now stir the solution to make sure it is evenly mixed. Watch aswe do this for you. Click Next to continue.
    31. 31. Congratulations!You’ve successfully learned how to create slime.If you’d like to view the simulation again, click here.When you are ready to continue, click the Next button.
    32. 32. Knowledge CheckLet’s check your knowledge. Put each of the steps listedin the correct order.1. Be sure you have the correct ingredients.2. Mix 4 ounces of water with 4 ounces of glue.3. Add one cup of water with one teaspoon of borax.4. Add the borax mix to the glue/water solution.5. Add three drops of food coloring6. Stir the elements.7. The slime is complete.
    33. 33. Our View of ID & Tech Writing
    34. 34. When I grow up I want to be…
    35. 35. Making the Transition Books  Online forums and Help Online Resources • Captivate • www.instructionaldesign.org • Lectora • Rapid eLearning Blog • Presenter • Search for:  Groups o “Instructional Design” • ASTD o “Adult Learning” • eLearning Guild o “Online Learning”  Classes • www.online-learning.com • Radcom
    36. 36. Questions?

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