indian energy sector overview

7,635 views

Published on

an overview of Indian energy sector .
each particular sector looked at .
data source is TEDDY ( TERI energy database yearbook)

Published in: Education
1 Comment
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
7,635
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
97
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
838
Comments
1
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

indian energy sector overview

  1. 1. PRESENTED BY SHIVRAJ SINGH NEGI RAVI SHANKAR KOMMU
  2. 2. ORGANIZATION OF ENERGY SECTOR <ul><li>Energy sector in India is dominated by government and its agencies. </li></ul><ul><li>It is guided in policy making by Power & Energy Policy and Rural Energy Division of Planning Commission. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of the large companies in energy sector are government owned. </li></ul><ul><li>The sector has only recently seen the rise of private sector companies. </li></ul><ul><li>A few areas like Nuclear Power , still under state monopoly. </li></ul>
  3. 3. ORGANIZATION OF ENERGY SECTOR
  4. 4. ORGANIZATION OF ENERGY SECTOR
  5. 5. INDIAN ENERGY SECTOR <ul><li>There is a strong two-way relationship between economic development and energy consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Primary commercial energy demand grew @ 5% between 1980-81 and 2005-06 </li></ul><ul><li>India accounted for 3.9 % of world’s commercial energy demand. </li></ul><ul><li>Low levels of per capita energy consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Since 1999, India’s energy intensity has been decreasing and is expected to continue to decrease. </li></ul><ul><li>High economic growth rates lead to higher rates of growth in energy consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Cost-effective and environmentally benign energy sources needed to maintain competitiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Energy is also the key to improve socio-economic conditions. </li></ul><ul><li>Future growth projections indicate total demand to rise up to 1887 MTOE by 2031, compared to 220 MTOE now. </li></ul>GDP v/s energy efficiency for top 40 economies
  6. 6. INDIAN ENERGY SECTOR
  7. 8. COAL AND LIGNITE <ul><li>Third largest producer in world. Coal is the mainstay . </li></ul><ul><li>Low quality . Coking coal imported. 22MT in 06-07. </li></ul><ul><li>Current production @ 450 MT , to increase up to 2350 MT by 2031. </li></ul><ul><li>Coal critical for future energy needs as reserves to production ratio is close to 217. </li></ul><ul><li>Reforms have been stalled by unionized labor force and coal lobby, allowing monopoly of CIL , leading to serious energy security, local, regional, and environment concerns. </li></ul><ul><li>Shallow mining preferred due to quick returns, producing poor quality and contaminated coal. </li></ul><ul><li>Price fluctuations cause of concern. </li></ul><ul><li>Large investments in infrastructure needed, high prices might actually bring more forex. </li></ul>
  8. 12. OIL AND GAS <ul><li>Domestic production stagnant for past 15 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Higher imports putting fiscal strains on economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Imports have tripled in 10 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Reserves augmented only to a minor extent by some recent discoveries. </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic oil reserve to be established ( 5MT by 2012). </li></ul><ul><li>NELP expected to result in more discoveries. </li></ul><ul><li>OALP mooted. Round the year licensing . </li></ul><ul><li>OVL and other companies investing in foreign fields ( Equity Oil). </li></ul><ul><li>India is emerging as a big refining hub, with technical advantages and capacity crunch worldwide allowing higher margins. </li></ul><ul><li>4218 Km of pipelines transporting crude and natural gas between refineries, production sites and consumption areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Reforms needed and alternative fuels to be considered. </li></ul>
  9. 15. BLOCKS OFFERED UNDER NELP
  10. 16. POWER <ul><li>Power generation has grown to 659.42 BU at a CAGR of 4.36% in 03-07. </li></ul><ul><li>Captive power production at 21000 MW. </li></ul><ul><li>Total length of transmission lines is 6778359 circuit km, with voltages ranging from 800 kV to 11 kV and less. </li></ul><ul><li>Close to 70% generation by thermal power, with coal contributing the most, followed by hydro, wind , nuclear and other sources. </li></ul><ul><li>High T&D and AT&C losses. </li></ul><ul><li>Total electrification and metering still not done. </li></ul><ul><li>Low per capita consumption compared to world, and regional variations in consumption patterns. </li></ul><ul><li>Reforms, investments and R&D for development of alternate resources needed. </li></ul>
  11. 23. RENEWABLE SOURCES <ul><li>Total capacity at 9372 MW, 6315 wind energy, 1905 small hydropower, 1152 Bio-power. </li></ul><ul><li>7% of total, Renewable energy is available in wide forms and sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Bio-power and Bagasse based co-generation, Biomass gassification, Solar photovoltaics, Wind, Small-hydropower, Urban and industrial waste, biogas , Solar, fuel cells, Bio-fuels, Hydrogen energy, ocean and geothermal energy are some of the potential sources. </li></ul><ul><li>High potential in each of these, with capability, if properly exploited and with sufficient technological advances, to replace much of the thermal power generation </li></ul><ul><li>Current constraining factors are high costs and lack of proper technologies to tap these sources. </li></ul><ul><li>IEP features : Renewable energy to be given special policies for well defined period to ensure outcomes , incentives to integrate alternative sources into systems should be linked with energy generated. </li></ul><ul><li>More policies and frameworks. </li></ul>
  12. 27. REFERENCES <ul><li>TERI Energy Data Directory and Yearbook 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>Reports on India’s Power sector by Economicaindia Info-services. </li></ul><ul><li>www.infraline.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.indiaenergyportal.org </li></ul><ul><li>www.planningcommission.nic.in </li></ul><ul><li>www.coal.nic.in </li></ul><ul><li>www.dghindia.org </li></ul><ul><li>www.windpower.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.powermin.nic.in </li></ul>

×