Jam Shar m p6/5   es     a
Poor Children There was no money for toys, nowhere to play    except alleys and yards.   Many poor children lived in tin...
Rich Children In victorian times you were either a rich child or a  poor child. Their toys would be toy soldiers or mayb...
The child workhouse The workhouse was a place where orphans and    disabled children went.   They would get food and a b...
Victorian schools Only richer families could afford to pay the school  fees, though some schools gave free places to poor...
Chimney sweeps The children were frequently underfed so that they would  remain small enough for the work. The work was ...
New laws for schools Reformers campaigned for new laws to improve  working conditions for children and give children the ...
Comparison!Rich children                   Poor children they would always go to the    If they did not work  top school...
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Victorian children james

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Victorian children james

  1. 1. Jam Shar m p6/5 es a
  2. 2. Poor Children There was no money for toys, nowhere to play except alleys and yards. Many poor children lived in tiny country cottages or city slums. If they had any toys they would be ragdolls or cheap penny toys. Children had to work for little or no money. Most familys couldn’t afford to take their kids to school.
  3. 3. Rich Children In victorian times you were either a rich child or a poor child. Their toys would be toy soldiers or maybe a train set. They would go away to a good boarding school or would be tutored by a governor at home.
  4. 4. The child workhouse The workhouse was a place where orphans and disabled children went. They would get food and a bed in return for work like picking oakum. The children who were born in the workhouse often stayed in the workhouse. You had to get up at 7am and work till 4pm and bed by 8pm every day. The punishment for not obeying the rules was nothing but bread and water for 2 days.
  5. 5. Victorian schools Only richer families could afford to pay the school fees, though some schools gave free places to poor boys. Poor girls did not go to school when the Victorian age began meaning they had little education. Sometimes, wealthy girls may have attended boarding schools. Ragged Schools were schools for poor children. One of the first was started in Portsmouth.
  6. 6. Chimney sweeps The children were frequently underfed so that they would remain small enough for the work. The work was extremely dangerous, severe burns, falls and lung disease killed many of the children. Children were not necessary, the job could be done, more safely, just a well, by using brushes. Children as young as 3 were used for the job. - They "outgrew" the job around 9 or 10.
  7. 7. New laws for schools Reformers campaigned for new laws to improve working conditions for children and give children the opportunity for schooling. In 1870 Parliament said there had to be a school in every town and village. In the 1860s a farmer might pay 6 pence (6d) a week for each child. By 1880, the law said that all children aged 5 to 10 must go to primary school, so every child would receive at least a basic education.
  8. 8. Comparison!Rich children Poor children they would always go to the  If they did not work top schools whatever the properly , they would not price. eat dinner! They would get everything  There was no fun it was all work they wanted.  They would be lucky if They were fed proper they would live to 40 nutritious food.  Their houses were literally And they would get big shaks! houses and lots of helpers. Verdict: rich children win!
  9. 9. I hope you liked it!

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