1 15 Tmdl Chesapeake Bay

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1 15 Tmdl Chesapeake Bay

  1. 1. Chesapeake Bay Term: TMDL
  2. 2. TMDL <ul><li>Total Maximum Daily Load </li></ul><ul><li>Will set limits for nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment </li></ul><ul><li>TMDL is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a waterbody can receive and still safely meet water quality standards </li></ul>
  3. 3. Section 303 <ul><li>A section of the Clean Water Act that requires states to list impaired waters </li></ul><ul><li>Fauquier County Impaired Waters </li></ul><ul><li>Cedar Run – E. Coli </li></ul><ul><li>Great Run – E. Coli </li></ul>
  4. 4. Chesapeake Bay Watershed <ul><li>Water Quality in this area will be controlled by the EPA </li></ul>
  5. 5. Timeline <ul><li>Bay cleanup goals from 1987 and 2000 were missed by wide margins </li></ul><ul><li>June 2008 – Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay asked for Federal help in clean-up </li></ul><ul><li>May 2009 – President Obama signed an Executive Order </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gives EPA control over local jurisdictions </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Timeline <ul><li>Executive Order is published May 12, 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>EPA accepted comments & input through Dec 18, 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>EPA has until June 2010 to publish a draft TMDL </li></ul><ul><li>There will be a comment period from June to September </li></ul><ul><li>Final TMDL is due by December 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>First goals will be met by December 31, 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>60% of nutrient reduction goal by 2017 </li></ul><ul><li>Clean Bay by 2025 </li></ul>
  7. 7. Monitoring <ul><li>Bay area is divided into 92 Segments </li></ul><ul><li>Parts of the Upper Rappahannock & Middle Potomac fall in Fauquier County </li></ul><ul><li>Milestones must be met every two years </li></ul>
  8. 8. Paying for Clean-up <ul><li>Most costs fall on state and local governments – most have budget deficits </li></ul><ul><li>States must submit plans to clean-up by June 1 st . </li></ul><ul><li>Costs are estimated at over $15 Billion </li></ul>
  9. 9. What are the consequences? <ul><li>If voluntary or contract conservation methods do not work, states will have to pass and enforce laws to decrease nutrient loads. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Will make some types of fertilizers only available by permit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will restrict permits for building/developing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will restrict Confinement Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Enforcement <ul><li>National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits – waste water </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier to regulate – EPA will take over permitting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will affect CAFOs esp. pork & poultry </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Non-point Source Pollution </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hard to regulate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enforcement is Unknown </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Transparent Monitoring – Nutrient numbers will be available to the public </li></ul>

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