Chapter 14: Partnering with 21st Century Families

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Early Childhood Education: Learning Together
by Virginia Casper and Rachel Theilheimer
(c)2009 McGraw-Hill Publishing

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Chapter 14: Partnering with 21st Century Families

  1. 1. Part Five: Linking to Home and Community Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  2. 2. Chapter 14: Partnering with Twenty-first Century Families Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  3. 3. Families <ul><li>Create the culture the child lives in </li></ul><ul><li>Know their children best </li></ul><ul><li>Can contribute valuable information </li></ul><ul><li>Can work with teachers to strengthen their connection with the children </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  4. 4. 3 Types of Relationships <ul><li>Teachers teach families </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers involve families </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers and families collaborate </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  5. 5. Parent Education Programs <ul><li>Teach parents new skills for raising their children </li></ul><ul><li>Programs solicit ideas and topics from parents </li></ul><ul><li>Includes discussion groups and classes </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  6. 6. Family Support Programs <ul><li>More focus on providing mutual support for different groups </li></ul><ul><li>Service ideas include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parent Education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drop-in play programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Home visiting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child Abuse Prevention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Counseling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information and resources </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  7. 7. Family-School Continuity Goals and Assumptions <ul><li>Children learn best when teachers and families work together </li></ul><ul><li>Parents and teachers must respect one another’s views </li></ul><ul><li>Parents and teachers are responsible for developing the child </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers must learn about the child’s life outside of the classroom </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  8. 8. Resistance to Parent Interactions <ul><li>Parents might feel threatened by the time the teacher spends with child </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers might feel threatened by being “put on the spot” as an expert </li></ul><ul><li>Parents might have a distrust of schools </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers might have too many other responsibilities </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  9. 9. Family <ul><li>The people who surround the child at home and who love and care for the child </li></ul><ul><li>Family might include members that are not biologically or legally related to the child, but assist in their upbringing </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  10. 10. Family Factors <ul><li>Adult work issues </li></ul><ul><li>Language spoken in home </li></ul><ul><li>Income levels </li></ul><ul><li>Family mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Presence or absence of members </li></ul><ul><li>Health or disability issues </li></ul><ul><li>Housing </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  11. 11. Institutional Racism <ul><li>Racism found in: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Health care </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  12. 12. Family Diversity <ul><li>Recognizing that each child comes from a unique family environment can help teachers appreciate differences in children </li></ul><ul><li>Children may have a difficult time understanding their own family culture in the context of the outside world </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  13. 13. Definitions of Father <ul><li>Cohabitating fathers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fathers who live in a family </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nonresidential biological father </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fathers who don’t live in the family </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social fathers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Men who have fathering roles with children </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  14. 14. Family Configuration <ul><li>Refers to the structural make-up of family </li></ul><ul><li>Types include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nuclear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extended </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Single-parent household </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blended families </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  15. 15. Lesbian- and Gay-Headed Families <ul><li>Use correct or true language </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the couple as Lesbian or Gay </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss multiple types of family structures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Invite families in to discuss their family structure </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  16. 16. Gathering Personal Information <ul><li>Respect the family member’s right to privacy </li></ul><ul><li>Use tact and discretion </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain Confidentiality </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  17. 17. Finding Optimal Distance <ul><li>An attempt to form a relationship that is neither too close or too distant to the child </li></ul><ul><li>An attempt to identify the boundaries between professional and personal lives </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  18. 18. Communication with the Family <ul><li>Respect a family’s beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>Honor family members’ perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Respect a family’s choices </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid assumptions or judgments </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  19. 19. Demonstrating Respect <ul><li>Express interest and caring </li></ul><ul><li>Be sensitive to cultural differences </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of the parents’ perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Be responsive to parents’ reactions </li></ul><ul><li>Control personal reactions </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  20. 20. Active Listening <ul><li>Concentrate on what is said </li></ul><ul><li>Think about what is said </li></ul><ul><li>Use non-verbals to indicate interest </li></ul><ul><li>Use previous knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Examine own biases </li></ul><ul><li>Ask for clarification </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize what was said </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  21. 21. Third Space <ul><li>A concept that attempts to bring two opposing perspectives closer </li></ul><ul><li>Offers an opportunity to step back and consider alternatives </li></ul><ul><li>Offers an opportunity to rekindle communication </li></ul><ul><li>Attempts to create a “new space” for discussion </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  22. 22. Family Interactions <ul><li>Home Visits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows more intimate communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridges the gap between school and home </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Classroom Visits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Familiarize children and families with classroom routines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can aid in transitions </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  23. 23. Parent-Teacher Conference <ul><li>Ask what is on parent’s mind </li></ul><ul><li>Share child’s work highlighting strengths and weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Include child in the conference </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  24. 24. Sharing Information <ul><li>Is beneficial to both teacher and parent </li></ul><ul><li>Can be done informally through chance encounters </li></ul><ul><li>Can be done formally through emails or conferences </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  25. 25. Facing Serious Issues <ul><li>Ask parents to keep you aware of any major changes at home </li></ul><ul><li>Share your observations with parents about serious incidents </li></ul><ul><li>Keep communication lines open, even if you are resistant </li></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York
  26. 26. Being an Advocate <ul><li>Is an integral part of professional development </li></ul><ul><li>Can be supported by the: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>State </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National organizations and coalitions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Foundations and partnerships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Agencies that promote child welfare </li></ul></ul>Copyright 2010 McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York, New York

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