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Literary terms for poetry

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Literary terms for poetry

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Literary terms for poetry

  1. 2. <ul><li>Figurative language that compares two unlike things and uses “like” or “as.” </li></ul><ul><li>The perfume smelled like a spring day. </li></ul>
  2. 3. <ul><li>Figurative language that compares two unlike things directly without using a specific word of comparison. </li></ul><ul><li>The crowd was a storm. </li></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>Figurative language that speaks of a nonhuman or inanimate thing as if it has human like qualities. </li></ul><ul><li>The frog cried. </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>People, places, events, or things that have meaning themselves but also stand for something beyond themselves. </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>The writer produces mood by creating images and using sounds that convey a particular feeling. </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>The attitude a writer takes toward his/her subject, characters, and audience. </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>The author’s message in a story. The author reveals something about life and people. </li></ul><ul><li>The stories that have a meaning beyond the people and events on their pages- meaning that we can use-are the ones that change our lives. This deeper meaning is called THEME. </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>The way a writer uses language. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Punctuation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allusion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>dialect </li></ul></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>The repetition of stressed and unstressed syllables—it provides the poem’s beat. </li></ul><ul><li>Thĭs lŏve ly flów ěr féll tŏ séed </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>A regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables. </li></ul><ul><li>Dăy áf těr dáy , dăy áf těr dáy </li></ul>
  11. 12. <ul><li>The repetition of the sounds of stressed syllables and any unstressed syllables that follow. </li></ul><ul><li>sport sputtering </li></ul><ul><li>court muttering </li></ul>
  12. 13. <ul><li>A pattern of rhymes in lines </li></ul><ul><li>ABAB or AABB and so on </li></ul>
  13. 14. <ul><li>The rhyming words occur at the end of the line. </li></ul>
  14. 15. <ul><li>These rhymes occur within lines. </li></ul>
  15. 16. <ul><li>These rhymes use sounds that are similar but not exactly the same. </li></ul><ul><li>Fellow hollow </li></ul><ul><li>Bat bit </li></ul>
  16. 17. <ul><li>Repetition of consonant sounds in words that are close together. </li></ul>
  17. 18. <ul><li>The repetition of vowel sounds in words close together. </li></ul>
  18. 19. <ul><li>The word imitates the sound it makes. </li></ul><ul><li>Crash bang boom </li></ul><ul><li>Snap crackle pop </li></ul>
  19. 20. <ul><li>Two rhyming lines are consecutive or together (one right after the other). </li></ul>
  20. 21. <ul><li>A poem written for someone who has died. </li></ul>
  21. 22. <ul><li>This does not have a regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables. Free verse sounds like ordinary speech. </li></ul>
  22. 23. <ul><li>Songlike poem that tells a story, often a sad story of betrayal, death, or loss. Ballads usually have a regular, steady rhythm, a simple rhyme pattern, and a refrain, all of which make them easy to memorize. </li></ul>
  23. 24. <ul><li>A long narrative poem about many deeds of a great hero. Epics are closely connected to a particular culture. The hero of an epic embodies the important values of the society he comes from. (Heroes from epics have-- so far-- been male.) </li></ul>
  24. 25. <ul><li>A poem that tells a story – a series of related events. </li></ul>
  25. 26. <ul><li>A poem that does not tell a story but expresses the personal feelings of a speaker. </li></ul>
  26. 27. <ul><li>A long lyric poem, usually praising some subject, and written in dignified language. </li></ul>
  27. 28. <ul><li>A fourteen-line lyric poem that follows strict rules of structure, meter, and rhyme. </li></ul><ul><li>Iambic pentameter is the meter or rhyme pattern most often found in Shakespearean sonnets. [Iambic refers to an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. Pentameter means there are five beats or meters per line.] </li></ul>

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