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Sheridan Brown Named Among Union Leader's 40 Under Forty

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Passion for wildlife a big part of Sheridan Brown’s law practice

By MEGHAN PIERCE
Union Leader Correspondent

January 26, 2014

(2014-01-27) GRANTHAM – Passionate protector of native wildlife, Sheridan Brown, 39, grew up in Dover where he gained an appreciation for nature.

Most recently Brown led a successful effort with the Loon Preservation Committee and N.H. Lakes Association to pass legislation to protect loons from toxic lead fishing sinkers and jigs. He also worked to successfully defeat a bill that would have allowed the taking of wild owls for falconry reasons.

Brown said he logged a lot of pro bono hours on both efforts but was thrilled to put his attorney and policy-writing skills to work for causes he is so passionate about as well as to be part of the efforts of so many other passionate volunteers.

“I was lucky I grew up in a household where my grandmother lived in the house for her later years, and she and my mother always made sure I got pushed out of the house to play outside,” Brown said. “I’ve always since I was a kid had an interest in wildlife and nature, particularly in bugs and birds.”

And through day trips with his mother to state parks and beach and horse barns across the state, Brown gained a deep appreciation for the Granite State.

After attending Southeastern New Hampshire Christian Academy in Somersworth, Brown went on to earn a B.A. in political science from the University of New Hampshire and a law degree from Suffolk University Law School.

Before starting his own law practice, he worked for U.S. Sen. John E. Sununu from 1999 to 2009 first as a constituent services specialist and then as projects assistant...

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Sheridan Brown Named Among Union Leader's 40 Under Forty

  1. 1. See lmlde for today’: i spa flu beauty don l wwvnuniunlondemcomlduals O ‘lh. -yr l nnllrilrg so purrvrjrrl as Imllr ' ‘FROM (005 TO THE SEA’ ’ts“/ S nun: num- iatflzfil Best and bri any 2%! NEW HAMPSHIRE NION fig Unionteademtn Monday, .lanuary 27, 2014 Passion for wildlife a big part of Sheridan Brown's law practice By MEGHAN PIERCE Union Leader Correspondent GRANTHAM - Passionate protector of native wild- life, Sheridan Brown, 39, grew tip in Dover where he gained art appreciation for nature. Most recently Brown led a successful effort with the Loon Preservation Com- mittee and N. l l. Lakes Association to pass legisla- tion to protect loons from toxic lead fishing sinkers and jigs. l le also worked to successfully defeat a l)ill that would have allowed the taking of wild owls for falconry reasons. "I was lucky I grew up in a household where my grandmother lived in the house for her later years, and she and my mother always made sure I got pushed out of the house to play outside, " Brown said. "I've always since I was a kid had an interest in wild- life and nature, particularly in bugs and birds. " And through day trips - with his mother to state parks and beach and horse barns across the state, Brown gained a deep ap- preciation for the (iranite State. After attending South- eastern New l latnpshire Christian Academy in Somersworth, Brown went Sheridan Brown, _3_. sl_ Home: Grantham Birthplace: Dover Family: Wife, Debra; mother, Carolyn; sister, Holly; cat, Vader High school: Southeastern New Hampshire Christian Academy, Somersworth College/ post grad degrees: B. A., political science, Univer- sity of New Hampshire; J. D., Suffolk University Law School Current job: Attomey at law and government relations con- sultant, Law Office of Sheridan T. Brown, PLLC Volunteer activities: Grantham Conservation Commission, member; Grantham Zoning Board of Adjustment, alternate; Newport Rotary, president-elect; N. H. Audubon, policy committee member and bald eagle monitor; Ausbon Sargent Land Preserva- tion Trust, outreach committee member. onto earn a B. /. in political science from the University of New Hampshire and a law degree from Suffolk University Law School. Before starting his own law practice, he worked for ' lJ. S. Sen. John E. Sununu from 1999 to 2009 first as a constituent services spe- cialist and then as projects assistant. Along with his private practice, Brown also works as a government relations consultant. Two years ago Brown and his wife. l)ebra, moved from Concord to Grantham where Brown has taken numerous opportunities to get involved in his new community. He serves on the Grantham Conserva- tion (Iommission and Grantham Zoning Board of Adjustment and is presi- dent of the Newport Rotary. I le volunteers as a mem- ber of the policy committee and bald eagle monitor for the N. l l. Audubon. l-le is also an outreach commit- tee tnember for the Ausbon Sargent [and Preservation Trust. ghtest 40 people you want to meet | Page (1 STATE Fllllltlh -Price$l.00 LEADER Val. l$l, No. l52 “Pages
  2. 2. 40 people you want to meet 9 Our 13th year: This year's class of "40 Under Forty’joins the ranks of those selected in past years who are doing great charitable work in New Hampshire, all while they successfully navigate careers and raise families. By BOB CHAREST New Hampshire Union Leader UNG AND BRIGHT and making their way in life, our honorees in the 13th class of 40 Under Forty that we unveil today are also tak- ing on many other responsibilities that are making New Hampshire a better place to live. In fact, that last part was one of the requirements the judges considered when they made their choices out of the nomina- tions received when the Union Leader put out a call for people to honor. In addition to living in New Hampshire and being under the age of 40, all of the people you will read about today within these pages have done something to help make New Hampshire a place we all want to call home. That is not easy as the men and women profiled here juggle careers, families and life. Some ofthem recently welcomed new additions to their families. Some have recently switched jobs. Others continue doing what they have done for years. In some instances, that includes saving lives and bringing value to their place in the world. The 27 men and 13 women chosen for the 13th class of the New Hampshire Union Leader's "40 Under Forty" today are some of New Hampshire's up-and-coming citi- zens. The 40 Under Forty program is presented by the New Hampshire Union Leader in cooperation with the Business and In- dustry Association of New Hampshire. An awards ceremony will be held Wednesday, March 19, at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord presented with the generous sponsorship of Citizens Bank. Tickets to that event are $40 per person. To buy tickets, visit unionleadencom/ forty or contact Christy DeTrude in the Union Leader's Community Relations Office at 206-7834 or by email at cdetrude@union- Ieader. com. Today's class joins the 480 men and women who have been named members of the 12 previous classes of "40 Under Forty, " chosen since the program's inception in 2002. Previous members include Chris Car- penter ofBedford, pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (named to 40 Under Forty in 2002); Olympic skier Bode Miller of Fran- > See Forty, Page (6
  3. 3. conia (named in 2003); U. S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte (2002); former Congressman and Manchester Mayor Frank Guinta (2002); and former Attorney General Michael Delaney (2005). And there have been more than a few heroes, including Lebanon's U. S. Army Capt. Ryan Welch. gunship in October 2004 while flying a mission in Iraq (named in 2005); and N. H. Army National Guard C Compan 3- 172 Infantry (Mountain commander Daniel Newman, who not only served tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, but continues saving lives as a firefighter for Merrimack who strapped himself along Fire Rescue (named in with a wounded man to the outside of his helicopter Mr. Stewart - on your 40 Under Forty (3 accomplishment! Bedford Martial Arts Staff 201 1 There have also been a r, ,, ~_rw'r ‘ _“'-_gIl£ll1-,1 u fair number of policemen, teachers, doctors, attorneys and many who have do- nated thousands of hours to charitable causes. More join their ranks today. They were nominated by family, friends, and co- workers, then culled by our judges to the 40 people you will read about within these ages. (And for those who are thinking ahead and would like to nominate someone for next year's class, to be named in January of2015, visit our website at www. unionleader. com/ forty. ) So, here are the men and women of New Hampshire, all under the age of 40, who this year have been selected because of their unselfish natures and good work on behalf of their communities. After a dozen years of being asked to identify the major problems in the Continued from Page (1 Granite State, our honor- ees continue to have their fingers on the pu. lse of the Granite State. This year's class of 40 Under Forty recipients is pretty much on the same page, with many ofthem identifying the need to keep young talent in the state. Back in 2002, when the New Hampshire Union Leader introduced the inaugural class of 40 Under Forty, many identi- fied the education-funding debate that was swirling in Concord as the preeminent COIICBUI. This year, many in the class echoed another wide- ly-held concern, namely "retaining and attracting young talent, " in the words of the state's new director of the Division of Econom- ic Development, (amren R. Lorentz, 37, of Gihnanton. See Forty, Page (10
  4. 4. WV I‘ Stephen Dunlter, 36, of Iledford, the vice president of sales and marketing at AM PM Facility Serviccsl l i‘l. t'il. l I ‘ ‘. .i. li. li. ‘i James P. Harris i~ Congratulations SIRBG SHEEHAN Pl-IINNEY BASS + GREEN PA t/ it l’l4‘llIL'. . luivfirin l. '.. i'v: r-; s'ei fl. ’-1‘ {. Jl. .:': i Mi ! ‘.. 'i'iuvei llli B: sion_ MA sun 5.». SPBG 1772-! ) watt Sl't'C‘ll£. l’l cum ~ -. .~. r». III) Floorcoat, agreed on the need for opportunities for young professionals and retaining talent in the New Hampshire workforce. Chris Wellington, 31, of Manches- ter, business development specialist for the N. H. Divi- sion of Economic Develop- ment, fine-tuned that a bit, saying the state needs to retain its college graduates and highly skilled workers. Union Leader Publisher loe McQuaid said that the interest many of this year's class expressed in attracting and keeping bright, young people here, "is very much in keeping with why we started 40 Under Forty. " "Saluting young people who are contributing so much to New Hampshire, in so many ways, is one ' way to encourage others, " McQuaid said. "And by the continued quality of these honorees, I think New Hampshire may be doing a bit better than some think. " l(yleVor| t, 31. of Bedford, We are proud [0 count Trent Spincr '07, of-this years 40 Under Forty class. as an alumnus and supporter of Franklinpicrce UNl'l. ll| l' t/ llrllll |3irrnu: r(': rircr for (Iommumt. umn Congratulations, Trent. www. franl<| irpierce. edu - 1-800-899-4000 chief revenue officer at DYN, lnc. , Manchester, has a front-row seat for the issue, saying we need to cul- tivate and retain our young- er workforce in the Granite State. Douglas Glennon, 39, of liarrington, owner of Glcnnon Consulting LLC, said we as a state need to educate high-tech workers and “attract the jobs to keep them in the state. " Sgt. Mark D. Bohar, 34, of Auburn, recruiting office supenrisor for the 157th Air Refueling Wing, New I Iampshire Air National Guard, in Newington, said, "I love calling New Hamp- shire home, but I know that finding specifically a career within can prove to be dil- ficult. It isn't just jobs that we need, it is careers. " Jay Poulin. 38, Berlin, president of I IIEB I-Znginecrs, added, "Most educated young graduates leave the area and don't have any l'(3ZlS0l'l I0 | '€[lll'l'l other than for family reasons. " Michael Shelton, 31, of Bcdford, media spokesperson for Public Service of New I larnpshire, Northeast Utilities, and Northern - Continued from Page (6 Pass, l. I.(3, said, "We need a healthy balance ofyoung people in our state to ensure the competitiveness of our workforce, our tiniquc cul- ture, and to foster a growing and vibrant economy. " Elizabeth E. D. Mc(orIna<lt. 33, of Concord, who was born in Chicago and is op- erational vice president of human resources and cor- porate counsel to national retailer Brookstone, head- quartered in Merrimack, said we need to retain and recruit educated young people to live and work in the state and help drive its ~econorny. '6ene Brown, 29, of - Manchester, sales repre- sentative for Surgi-(Iare, Inc. , has been working here since he graduated from college back in 2007, sell- ing rnetlical implants and devices in the operating room. He agrees and feels another problem is more pressing: "'lhe torch is being passed, the time is ours, and if we, the leaders of our generation, clon‘t step in anti continue" the many charitable programs in New See Forty, Page (12 " ' '23 . .
  5. 5. counsel for the IP and E-Commerce Group at Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, has a thought- ful approach to the prob- lem. She said, "I believe we have a technology deficit that has a profound impact on the economic viability of our state. Investing in state-of-the- art networks would better position us to attract new business and business in- vestment, create jobs and retain local talent, allow state universities to grow distance learning pro- grams and bring distance learning opportunities to residents in rural loca- tions. " Joanne Lynn Riker, 31, of Dover, a special educa- tion case monitor/ depart- ment head at Spaulding High School in Rochester, who recently welcomed new son Carter, on Ian. 4, said, "Many children and families do not have the support needed available for them, whether it's in- home support and coun- seling, housing placement support, or group home availability for children. " Steve Venezia, 30, of llillsborough, an attor- ney at Upton & Ilatfield, welcomed a new daugh- ter last April and said, "A balance must be found be- tween older and younger populations to ensure ~ Continued from Page (Is New Hampshire's success" in the future. We must at-' tract talented individuals"T and businesses in order to build communities _ that are economically and' socially stable. " State Rep. Joe Sweeney, _ 20, of Salem, our young- ; est honoree this year, is a student at the Univer- sity of New Hampshire in addition to his duties as state representative. He considers his key current professional challenge as, " "Putting New Hampshire" in the best position to spur growth and expand the economic objectives ofthe state. " ' And 3] Perry, 31, of Man? ' Chester, director ofopera-' tions at KRI. Electronics, ’ showed that while this year's honorees representi a new generation, they are still firmly rooted in y the past: Perry is the third" generation to work in his family-owned company and recently renegotiated a major contract for his family business. "'Ihe firm I did business with had a member who worked closely with my late father. At the end of the meeting he said my persona and the way I try to do busi- ness reminded him of my dad. Becoming my dad is pretty amazing to me and is honestly my Tommy Boy moment. " '

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