Political Aspect of Puerto Rico<br />Brought to you by these fine folks:<br />Carissa Pangelinan<br />Patti Rodriguez<br /...
Commonwealth, organized territory of US<br />
Puerto Ricans…<br />are citizens of the<br /> United States<br />
Puerto Ricans…<br />serve in the armed forces<br />
Puerto Ricans…<br />are exempt from <br />federal income taxes <br />
Puerto Ricans…<br />are subject to all federal laws<br />
Defense<br />Foreign Relations<br />Trade<br />
Defense<br />Foreign Relations<br />Trade<br />
Defense<br />Foreign Relations<br />Trade<br />
Cooperate on joint programs<br />
Citizens 18 yrs. of age & older <br />Citizens 18 yrs. of age & older <br />
 Major political divisions in Puerto Rico<br />Reflect feeling about ties with the US<br />
Major Political Parties<br />
Popular Democratic Party<br />Partido Popular Democrático  (PPD)<br />
<ul><li>Favors commonwealth status for island
Traditionally drawn its support from rural areas
Due to rapid urbanization in last half of 20th century much of PPD’s rural population support has declined</li></li></ul><...
<ul><li>Advocates statehood for Puerto Rico
A means of gaining a larger share of federal funds and social programs than the island receives as a commonwealth
Support comes from urban areas </li></li></ul><li>
Independence Party<br />PartidoIndependentistaPuertorriqueño (PIP)<br />
<ul><li>Seeks  immediate independence
Wants to create a socialist democratic republic
Several other minor parties also support independence</li></li></ul><li>Puerto Rico’s Political Status<br />by: Carissa Pa...
Political Parties	<br />New Progressive Party (NPP) <br />
Political Parties<br />Popular Democratic Party (PDP)<br />
1967 Plebiscite<br />Total No. of Votes: 707, 293<br />60 % Commonwealth <br />39% Statehood <br />1% Independence<br />
1993 Plebiscite<br />Total No. of Votes: 1,700,990<br />48.6 % Commonwealth <br />46.3% Statehood <br />4.4% Independence<...
1998 Plebiscite<br />Total No. of Votes: 1,566,270<br />0.06 % Commonwealth <br />46.49% Statehood <br />2.54% Independenc...
Group Activity<br />If you were a member of Congress, how would you define the options on the ballot differently, in order...
Political Status Movements Today<br />HR Bill 900 introduced by Jose Serrano<br />‘Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007’<br /...
Section 2 (a)<br />SEC. 2. PUERTO RICAN DECISION ON PRESENT STATUS.(a) Plebiscite- The Puerto Rico State Elections Commiss...
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PS225 State & Territorial Government Presentation on Politics in Puerto Rico

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  • Under provisions of its 1952 constitution, Puerto Rico is a commonwealth freely associated w/ USPuerto Rican government maintains control over local issuesBUT island is required to comply with most federal legislation
  • Puerto Ricans:1) are citizens of the US
  • serve in the armed forces
  • are exempt from federal income taxes, but they pay commonwealth taxes
  • Are subject to all federal laws
  • The US Government is responsible for the island’s…
  • Defense…
  • foreign relations
  • and trade.
  • US & Puerto Rican government often cooperate on joint programs the benefit the island
  • Puerto Rican citizens 18 years of age and older may vote
  • The major political divisions in Puerto Rico reflect feeling about ties with the US…Meaning that the divisions of the parties pay close attention to their relationship with the US
  • These are Puerto Rico’s Political Parties.
  • The Popular Democratic Party (PPD)
  • The Popular Democratic Party (PPD) 1) favors commonwealth status for island 2) responsible for the creation of Puerto Rico’s commonwealth status 3) traditionally drawn its support from rural areas 4) Due to rapid urbanization in last half of 20th century much of PPD’s support as rural pop. declined 5) shift explains PPD’s loss of influence in recent years
  • 1968 elections, the PPD lost to the New Progressive Party (PNP)
  • 1) advocates statehood for Puerto Rico 2) viewed statehood as a means of gaining a larger share of federal funds and social programs than the island receives as a commonwealth 3) Unlike the PPD, support comes from urban areas (San Juan and Ponce)
  • Since 1968 control of Puerto Rico has alternated btwn PPD and PNP
  • The small Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP)
  • seeks immediate independencewants to create a socialist democratic republic (govt. would play a major role in economic planning, production of goods, & distribution of wealth)several other minor parties also support independence
  • Class will also have a copy of the bill in their hands. This is Congress’s attempt to resolve the conflict. Their response to “Puerto Rico Herald” (explain this before hand)
  • PS225 State & Territorial Government Presentation on Politics in Puerto Rico

    1. 1. Political Aspect of Puerto Rico<br />Brought to you by these fine folks:<br />Carissa Pangelinan<br />Patti Rodriguez<br />Mike Camacho<br />JoesphTenorio<br />
    2. 2. Commonwealth, organized territory of US<br />
    3. 3. Puerto Ricans…<br />are citizens of the<br /> United States<br />
    4. 4. Puerto Ricans…<br />serve in the armed forces<br />
    5. 5. Puerto Ricans…<br />are exempt from <br />federal income taxes <br />
    6. 6. Puerto Ricans…<br />are subject to all federal laws<br />
    7. 7.
    8. 8. Defense<br />Foreign Relations<br />Trade<br />
    9. 9. Defense<br />Foreign Relations<br />Trade<br />
    10. 10. Defense<br />Foreign Relations<br />Trade<br />
    11. 11. Cooperate on joint programs<br />
    12. 12. Citizens 18 yrs. of age & older <br />Citizens 18 yrs. of age & older <br />
    13. 13. Major political divisions in Puerto Rico<br />Reflect feeling about ties with the US<br />
    14. 14. Major Political Parties<br />
    15. 15. Popular Democratic Party<br />Partido Popular Democrático (PPD)<br />
    16. 16. <ul><li>Favors commonwealth status for island
    17. 17. Traditionally drawn its support from rural areas
    18. 18. Due to rapid urbanization in last half of 20th century much of PPD’s rural population support has declined</li></li></ul><li>New Progressive Party<br />Partido Nuevo Progresista de Puerto Rico (PNP)<br />
    19. 19. <ul><li>Advocates statehood for Puerto Rico
    20. 20. A means of gaining a larger share of federal funds and social programs than the island receives as a commonwealth
    21. 21. Support comes from urban areas </li></li></ul><li>
    22. 22. Independence Party<br />PartidoIndependentistaPuertorriqueño (PIP)<br />
    23. 23. <ul><li>Seeks immediate independence
    24. 24. Wants to create a socialist democratic republic
    25. 25. Several other minor parties also support independence</li></li></ul><li>Puerto Rico’s Political Status<br />by: Carissa Pangelinan<br />Patti Rodriguez<br />Mike Camacho<br />Joesph<br />
    26. 26. Political Parties <br />New Progressive Party (NPP) <br />
    27. 27. Political Parties<br />Popular Democratic Party (PDP)<br />
    28. 28. 1967 Plebiscite<br />Total No. of Votes: 707, 293<br />60 % Commonwealth <br />39% Statehood <br />1% Independence<br />
    29. 29. 1993 Plebiscite<br />Total No. of Votes: 1,700,990<br />48.6 % Commonwealth <br />46.3% Statehood <br />4.4% Independence<br />
    30. 30. 1998 Plebiscite<br />Total No. of Votes: 1,566,270<br />0.06 % Commonwealth <br />46.49% Statehood <br />2.54% Independence<br />0.29% Free-Association <br />50.30% None of the Above <br />
    31. 31. Group Activity<br />If you were a member of Congress, how would you define the options on the ballot differently, in order to prevent what happened in the 1998 plebiscite from happening again? <br />
    32. 32. Political Status Movements Today<br />HR Bill 900 introduced by Jose Serrano<br />‘Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2007’<br />The Puerto Rico State Elections Commission shall conduct a plebiscite in Puerto Rico not later than December 31, 2009<br />
    33. 33. Section 2 (a)<br />SEC. 2. PUERTO RICAN DECISION ON PRESENT STATUS.(a) Plebiscite- The Puerto Rico State Elections Commission shall conduct a plebiscite in Puerto Rico not later than December 31, 2009. The two options set forth on the ballot shall be preceded by the following statement: Instructions: Mark one of the following two options: (1) Puerto Rico should continue to have its present form of territorial status and relationship with the United States. If you agree, mark here XXXXXXXXXX. (2) Puerto Rico should pursue a constitutionally-viable permanent non-territorial status. If you agree, mark here XXXXXXXXXX.<br />
    34. 34. SECTION 2 (b)<br />(b) Recommendations- If a majority of the validly-cast ballots in the plebiscite favors Option 2, Congress recognizes the inherent authority of the People of Puerto Rico to--<br />(1) call a Constitutional Convention, constituted by a number of delegates to be determined in accordance to legislation approved by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, for the purpose of proposing to the People of Puerto Rico a self-determination option which, if approved by the People of Puerto Rico in a referendum, would be presented to Congress by the Constitutional Convention; or<br />(2) conduct a plebiscite administered by the Puerto Rico State Elections Commission to consider a self-determination option with the results presented to Congress.<br />
    35. 35. SecTion 3 (C)<br />(c) Eligibility; Ballot- Persons eligible to vote under this subsection shall, upon timely request submitted to the Puerto Rico State Elections Commission in compliance with any terms imposed by the Electoral Law of Puerto Rico, be entitled to receive an absentee ballot for the plebiscite. Each of the following shall be eligible to vote in the plebiscite held under this Act:<br />(1) All eligible voters under the electoral laws in effect in Puerto Rico at the time the plebiscite is held.<br />(2) All United States citizens born in Puerto Rico who comply, to the satisfaction of the Puerto Rico State Elections Commission, with all Puerto Rico State Elections Commission requirements (other than the residency requirement) applicable to eligibility to vote in a general election.<br />
    36. 36. Group Activity<br />If you were a member of Congress, would you support this bill? Why or why not?<br />Has your territory lobbied with Congress to request for a plebiscite in order for your territory’s inhabitants to exercise self-determination? If not, why do you think that is?<br />

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