Incorporating
Common Core
Literacy
Standards
into
Non-ELA
classrooms
LITERACY IN THE
CONTENT AREAS
What are “shifts”?
 Shifts are the changes we
will see in instruction
during CCSS
implementation
 Impact on teachers: th...
THE LITERACY SHIFTS
Major Literacy Shifts
Translation
Building knowledge
through content‐rich
nonfiction
 All content ar...
What quantity of information texts
do students have to read?
WHAT’S WITH ALL THESE SHIFTS?
Major Literacy Shifts
Translation
Reading, writing and
speaking grounded
In evidence from t...
WHAT’S WITH ALL THESE SHIFTS?
Major Literacy Shifts
Translation
Regular practice
with Complex text
and its academic
langu...
Lexile=Reading level displayed as a number
 It is not enough to read
only on grade level-
COHERENCE required
 By the end of the
school year, students
should be loo...
 In the content areas like
science and social studies,
its not always the jargon
that intimidates students
 In addition ...
REGULAR PRACTICE WITH COMPLEX TEXT AND ITS
ACADEMIC LANGUAGE: WHY?
• Gap between complexity of college and high school
tex...
DETERMINING TEXT COMPLEXITY
11
WHICH TEXT IS MORE COMPLEX?
Lincoln was shaken by the
presidency. Back in Springfield,
politics had been a sort of
exhila...
4 IMPORTANT RESOURCES FOR TEXTS
 What Kind of text
should I choose?
 I found a online. How
can I know its lexile?
 Wher...
 Content area teachers often struggle with knowing how to
incorporate the literacy standards into their instruction
 Tri...
What is Close Reading?
 Reading a complex text
multiple times in order
to gain a deeper
understanding
 4 focus areas:
 ...
 Achieve3000.com-lesson and article database
 Search for texts within any content area
 Instant differentiated instruct...
Framework created
especially for CCSS
Template-based
approach to
teaching literacy in
the content areas
For Science
tea...
How Do I create an LDC
Module?
 All framework materials
are available on
literacydesigncollaborativ
e.org
 Perfectly fin...
WHAT IS A THEME-BASED
CURRICULA?
 Based on a central
‘real life’ theme
 Encourages process
learning and active
involveme...
EXAMPLE OF THEMATIC UNIT FOR
ELEMENTARY
Topic: Olympics
 Language Arts/Social Studies- Students read a story
about a gold...
ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING
Why argue?
 Argumentation deepens
understanding
 Notice how people on the
internet become
“researchers” when they are
tr...
SPEAKING AND LISTENING STANDARDS
The “forgotten” CCS
standards!
Suggestions for
implementation:
 Orally and visually
presenting lab report
data
 Socrat...
 Requires technology
incorporation to meet all
of the S&L standards
 Suggestions:
 have students present
information in...
Objectives of Socratic
Seminar
 Foster independent thought
in students
 Engage students actively in
discourse surroundin...
S.S. is a whole class, non-
scripted, text-dependent
discussion where the
students elaborate on the
ideas of others-only ...
Why write so much?
 Goodbye LEAP-projected
to be replaced next
school year with PARCC
assessments
 Requires a great deal...
IF YOU DON’T PRACTICE WRITING WITH A
FORMAT/TEMPLATE:
You get this. And this is awful.
THE RESOURCES YOU SAW TODAY
Sbanks.wikispaces.com
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CCSS Literacy in the content areas

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Describes strategies that can be used to implement common core standards into science, social studies, and technical subjects

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  • 1st bullet: Research that informed the development of the Standards revealed that there is a significant gap in the complexity of what students read by the end of high school and what they are required to read in both college and careers – by 4 years! Studies by Hayes and Wolfer cited in the Standards show that the texts students are asked to read in 11th grade are equal in complexity to what students were asked to read in 7th grade in 1961.

    2nd bullet: In a study done by ACT in 2006, it was found that the complexity level of what students read at each grade level has dropped 4 years in the last half of the 20th century (and has remained the same in the last decade). Yet, a student’s ability to read complex text is the greatest predictor of college success.

    3rd bullet: Less than 50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts.

    4th bullet: The Standards build a “staircase of complexity,’” which allows students to read increasingly complex text through the years so that they complete high school ready for the challenging texts they will need to read and understand in college and careers.

    5th bullet: The academic language of informational text is different than narrative literature. Exposing students to this vocabulary and syntax enhances the breadth of their academic language; lack of this exposure narrows it. The specific vocabulary here is not the typical content-specific vocabulary, but rather, words such as dedicate, ignite, consequence – knowing these words supports students in reading complex text across subject areas.
  • Text complexity is measured in terms of three factors – qualitative, quantitative, and reader and task consideration.

    All factors are equally important when determining text complexity.
  • The context: 11th grade history class.
    The question: Which text is more complex?

    Allow participants 1 minute to read both texts. Then allow several minutes to discuss their responses.

    Answer: the left on the left in more complex for a 11th grade students. (Complex sentences, Lack of words, sentences or paragraphs that review or pull things together for the student, dense information, sophisticated vocabulary, sophisticated subject matter and concepts)

    (Texts were excerpted from CCSS Appendix B. The text on the left is an informational text for 11th – CCR and the text on the right is an information text for grades 2nd – 3rd)
  • In a theme-based curriculum contain units and activities in those units are typically based on real life themes or topics that cross several areas of the curriculum. They provide an environment that fosters and encourages process learning and active involvement of ALL students (Fisher, 1991). Thematic teaching helps students build on their interests and prior knowledge by focusing on topics relevant to their lives. Thematic units are a great vehicle for integrating content areas in a way that makes sense to children and helps them make connections to transfer knowledge they learn and apply it in a meaningful way. Content covered in the units may span over several weeks. Often three or more subject areas are involved in the study, and in some cases there may be school wide participation. The unit typically ends with an integrated culminating activity.

    Transition Statement:
    Let’s review an example. . .
  • Here’s an example unit about the Olympics for an elementary school. There are lots of opportunities hear to integrate the literacy standards. But remember, it depends on the text selected and what the teacher does with the text.

    Notice the opportunity to address these standards when using the venn diagram in social studies if we select two different texts for a triathlon and pentathlon. (Instructions: Click mouse to bounce in the craft and structure standards)

    Look at the themed unit again? What other standards for literacy do you think could be addressed among the content areas and activities listed here? (Instructions: Click mouse to move the craft and structure standards off the page) Pause for a moment before going onto the next slide so participant has time to think about the last question.
  • CCSS Literacy in the content areas

    1. 1. Incorporating Common Core Literacy Standards into Non-ELA classrooms LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS
    2. 2. What are “shifts”?  Shifts are the changes we will see in instruction during CCSS implementation  Impact on teachers: the way we are accustomed to instructing students is moving toward developing higher order thinking, deeper understanding, and discourse about content based in text UNDERSTANDING THE SHIFTS
    3. 3. THE LITERACY SHIFTS Major Literacy Shifts Translation Building knowledge through content‐rich nonfiction  All content area teachers for science, social studies, and technical subjects are now teachers of literacy  ELA classes cannot do it all-that the rest of the subjects have to contribute Non-Fictional Texts
    4. 4. What quantity of information texts do students have to read?
    5. 5. WHAT’S WITH ALL THESE SHIFTS? Major Literacy Shifts Translation Reading, writing and speaking grounded In evidence from text, both literary and informational  Rather than asking students questions they can answer solely from prior knowledge or experience, they now answer questions that require them to read a text  No more “how does this make you feel” type prompts  If they can answer the questions without reading the texts, then the prompt is not CCSS compliant Evidence from Text
    6. 6. WHAT’S WITH ALL THESE SHIFTS? Major Literacy Shifts Translation Regular practice with Complex text and its academic language  Literacy (reading and writing) increases in complexity from the beginning of the year (semester) to the end  Start off at grade level, then progress higher throughout the semester  Focus on higher levels of vocabulary comprehension Text Complexity
    7. 7. Lexile=Reading level displayed as a number
    8. 8.  It is not enough to read only on grade level- COHERENCE required  By the end of the school year, students should be looking at texts in lexile bands for the NEXT reading level  Ex.-by the end of 8th grade, students should read 9th grade texts on the lower end of the lexile band INCREASING TEXT COMPLEXITY 995 1115 8th Grade
    9. 9.  In the content areas like science and social studies, its not always the jargon that intimidates students  In addition to the content jargon, also consider syntax and the way the words are used in a sentence  Things like this can be addressed during a close reading lesson (more info on close reading to come) Students need to practice seeing and using the words within the context of the sentence-words in isolation not as effective COMPLEX VOCABULARY
    10. 10. REGULAR PRACTICE WITH COMPLEX TEXT AND ITS ACADEMIC LANGUAGE: WHY? • Gap between complexity of college and high school texts is huge. • What students can read, in terms of complexity, is greatest predictor of success in college ( 2006 ACT study). • Too many students are reading at too low a level. • Standards include a staircase of increasing text complexity from elementary through high school. • Standards also focus on building general academic vocabulary so critical to comprehension. 10
    11. 11. DETERMINING TEXT COMPLEXITY 11
    12. 12. WHICH TEXT IS MORE COMPLEX? Lincoln was shaken by the presidency. Back in Springfield, politics had been a sort of exhilarating game; but in the White House, politics was power, and power was responsibility. Never before had Lincoln held executive office. In public life he had always been an insignificant legislator whose votes were cast in concert with others and whose decisions in themselves had neither finality nor importance. As President he might consult with others, but innumerable grave decisions were in the end his own, and with them came a burden of responsibility terrifying in its dimensions. According to those who knew him, Lincoln was a man of many faces. In repose, he often seemed sad and gloomy. But when he began to speak, his expression changed. “The dull, listless features dropped like a mask,” said a Chicago newspaperman. “The eyes began to sparkle, the mouth to smile, the whole countenance was wreathed in animation, so that a stranger would have said, ‘Why, this man, so angular and solemn a moment ago, is really handsome.’” 12 Text 1 Text 2
    13. 13. 4 IMPORTANT RESOURCES FOR TEXTS  What Kind of text should I choose?  I found a online. How can I know its lexile?  Where can I find examples of the sort of texts required?  What is student writing supposed to look like? CCSS Publisher’s Criteria for Text Selection Link to lexile.com CCSS Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Assessments CCSS Appendix C: Writing Samples for Science, Social Studies, and Technical Subjects
    14. 14.  Content area teachers often struggle with knowing how to incorporate the literacy standards into their instruction  Tried and true CCSS compliant methods:  Close reading -any text, any time-take a complex text and read it more than once and engage in discussions with teammates to gain a deeper understanding of the text (I have a template for you)  Literacy Design Collaborative: framework for implementing the CCSS into science, social studies, and technical subjects (warning label: training recommended to properly create a module…and there are modules that are already made)  Argumentative writing -can we say “instant engagement”? Deeper level of understand obtained when stating counterarguments  Discourse -can include whole class discussions like Socratic seminar and small group discussions that surround a piece of text HOW AM I SUPPOSED TO TEACH LITERACY? I AM A NON ELA TEACHER!
    15. 15. What is Close Reading?  Reading a complex text multiple times in order to gain a deeper understanding  4 focus areas:  Multiple read-throughs  Text-dependent questions  Discourse about the text  Writing  Choose a text based on what topic you are teaching  Highly Suggested: determine the lexile level of the text  Use a close reading lesson planning template CLOSE READING Tips for Teachers Publisher’s Criteria Close reading template
    16. 16.  Achieve3000.com-lesson and article database  Search for texts within any content area  Instant differentiated instruction-can choose a lexile grade band to adjust the same text for different levels  If you follow the lessons word-for-word, from beginning to end, they encompass close reading strategies!  Available to all Jefferson Parish teachers  Login- CommonCore.Teacher  Password: CommonCore.Teacher  Sciencenews.org (sciencenewsforkids.org)-FABOLOUS free scientific articles relevant to current events; print publication also for a fee  Newspapers, magazines, documents such as the Bill of Rights  Excerpts from books (close reading is intended for shorter texts) WHERE CAN I FIND TEXTS FOR CLOSE READING?
    17. 17. Framework created especially for CCSS Template-based approach to teaching literacy in the content areas For Science teachers: specially made science templates LITERACY DESIGN COLLABORATIVE The “Select LDC Template Task Adaptations for Use in Science Classrooms” support reading and writing distinctive to scientific work. Options include a Research Design Plan, a Background Research/ piece, and a Research Abstract Educurious Science Templates Teachingchannel.org
    18. 18. How Do I create an LDC Module?  All framework materials are available on literacydesigncollaborativ e.org  Perfectly fine to teach a module that has already been made! Also found on the site  Training is recommended, but not required LITERACY DESIGN COLLABORATIVE
    19. 19. WHAT IS A THEME-BASED CURRICULA?  Based on a central ‘real life’ theme  Encourages process learning and active involvement  Integrates several content areas  Typically ends with an integrated culminating activity Theme Language Arts Social Studies Science Math Health Fine Arts
    20. 20. EXAMPLE OF THEMATIC UNIT FOR ELEMENTARY Topic: Olympics  Language Arts/Social Studies- Students read a story about a gold medal winner and create their own gold model  Geography/Art- Students create a map of a country  Language Arts/ Social Studies- Compare and Contrast a triathlon with a pentathlon using a Venn diagram  Math- Students measure a parade route for Opening Ceremonies  Art/Current Events: Draw Olympic mascots  Writing: Examine/Create poems for winners of events  PE: Participate in Your Own Events  Science: Create meals for athletes using food pyramid INFO Craft 4. De acad phras or su 5. Co (e.g. probl or inf
    21. 21. ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING
    22. 22. Why argue?  Argumentation deepens understanding  Notice how people on the internet become “researchers” when they are trying to prove a point?  Forces the writer to consider the counterarguments and other viewpoints  Can be done as a stand- alone writing project or as an LDC module How?  Choose a text that aligns with your content instruction  Pose an essential question to the students (i.e. Do you think that ____ should be mandatory?)  Use the resources provided below to get you started ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING Information for Argumentative Writing Graphic Organizer for Argumentative
    23. 23. SPEAKING AND LISTENING STANDARDS
    24. 24. The “forgotten” CCS standards! Suggestions for implementation:  Orally and visually presenting lab report data  Socratic Seminar  Orally summarizing an article  Kagan© Cooperative Learning team strategies SPEAKING AND LISTENING STANDARDS Remember: promote good social behaviors- making eye contact, speaking clearly, good posture, etc.
    25. 25.  Requires technology incorporation to meet all of the S&L standards  Suggestions:  have students present information in a variety of mediums  power points/prezi presentations  Google Docs for collaborating on papers/projects  Google Apps-forms, surveys, questionnaires, etc.  Promethean Board Let students create a survey or questionnaire that utilizes the activotes Include small group as well as whole group discussions Literacy Partners Strategy SPEAKING AND LISTENING STANDARDS
    26. 26. Objectives of Socratic Seminar  Foster independent thought in students  Engage students actively in discourse surrounding content  Encourage deep dives into text  Promote deep understanding by providing students with open-ended questions  Promote social awareness and norms of a civilized discussion  End product: text dependent writing What S.S. is NOT:  a debate or argument-no one attempts to persuade others but rather speaks openly about the topic  Teacher centered-this is a student centered activity facilitated by the teacher  Just for English classes- any content area can incorporate Socratic Seminar into the classroom SOCRATIC SEMINAR
    27. 27. S.S. is a whole class, non- scripted, text-dependent discussion where the students elaborate on the ideas of others-only one person can speak at a time FYI: Socratic Seminar addresses at least 12 Common Core standards if done correctly WHAT EXACTLY IS A SOCRATIC SEMINAR? Socratic Seminar Planning Document
    28. 28. Why write so much?  Goodbye LEAP-projected to be replaced next school year with PARCC assessments  Requires a great deal of writing on a computer  If writing does not become routine in all subject areas, scores will suffer…a lot  Writing is primarily how deeper levels of understanding will be assessed, even in math  Need practice writing to a variety of audiences (to the Governor, Principal, peer, parent, agency, etc.)  Consider using a template for students to format & structure their writing MOVING WRITE ALONG
    29. 29. IF YOU DON’T PRACTICE WRITING WITH A FORMAT/TEMPLATE: You get this. And this is awful.
    30. 30. THE RESOURCES YOU SAW TODAY Sbanks.wikispaces.com

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