Helping
citizens
develop their
own
information
literacy
curriculum for
lifelong
learning
Sheila Webber and
Bill Johnston
U...
Curriculum for an information literate
lifecourse
• Individual reflecting on his/her information literacy
contexts
• Ident...
Schuller and Watson (2009) life stages
• Up to 25
• 25-50
• 50-75
• Over 75
– Ageing society
– Changing patterns of paid/u...
Need for self-awareness
• Individuals accumulating far more information themselves
– Information Management not just an or...
Contextual & Varying views of IL
Australia
Thailand
Syria
Work context
Disciplinary
Country
Marketing academics
At the hea...
Information literate
person
Information economy:
•Law
•Changes in media
•Pricing etc
Organisational culture:
•Mission; Val...
Examples
Personal goals:
Qualification through
Part-time study
Organisational culture:
•Group work collaboration
•Coursewo...
Information economy:
Personal goals, habits,
special needs
Local & national culture &
society
Technical changes
Sheila in ...
Some questions
• What information / information literacy needs arise?
• Do I need to develop my own information literacy t...
Example from my map
• AMD
– Information to do with the medical condition
– Information to do with care and support for fam...
Activity with librarians
1. Create your own map of changes, using the elements
in the diagram "The information literate pe...
Activity with students
1. Create your own map of changes, using the elements in the
diagram "The information literate pers...
Curriculum perspectives
Holistic institutional view
– Course design
– Pedagogy
– Content
– Processes
– Interactions
– Conn...
Ways forward
• If mission to help people become more information
literate citizens (which may be a perspective shift for
l...
• Lifelong Learning
initiatives
• OERs
• Apps
• MOOCs
Possible enablers
Sheila Webber
Information School
University of Sheffield
s.webber@shef.ac.uk
Twitter: @sheilayoshikawa
http://information-...
References
• Kelly, B. (2013) When Staff and Researchers Leave Their
Host Institution. UK Web focus, 22 March.
http://ukwe...
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Helping citizens develop their own information literacy curriculum for lifelong learning

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Presentation by Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston, given at the CILIP Umbrella copnference on 2 July 2013 in Manchester, UK. The abstract for this presentation read: "Sheila and Bill will outline a framework to enable citizens to self-audit their changing information literacy needs through life, so they can identify strategies for meeting those needs. In particular they will highlight lifestage transitions. They will indicate implications for people who support these citizens, including possibilities in using tools such as MOOCs."

Published in: Education

Helping citizens develop their own information literacy curriculum for lifelong learning

  1. 1. Helping citizens develop their own information literacy curriculum for lifelong learning Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston Umbrella, July 2013
  2. 2. Curriculum for an information literate lifecourse • Individual reflecting on his/her information literacy contexts • Identifying IL strengths, gaps & priorities for his/her stage in life - forming his/her own personal “curriculum” for development • Being able to audit his/her context at these different stages of life • Role of LIS professionals and educators in supporting this process Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013 See: Webber and Johnston (2013)
  3. 3. Schuller and Watson (2009) life stages • Up to 25 • 25-50 • 50-75 • Over 75 – Ageing society – Changing patterns of paid/unpaid activity – Current imbalance in spending on education (& in researchers’ & librarians’ attention?) – They advocate constructing“a curriculum framework for citizens’ capabilities” Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  4. 4. Need for self-awareness • Individuals accumulating far more information themselves – Information Management not just an organisational matter • Unexpected/ expected life changes • Having underlying IL and self-awareness to identify occasions when need to audit situation and bring IL to fore • Examples: Brian Kelly’s (2013) reflections on problems associated with redundancy; escaping from Syria; adjusting to new workplace in China • Self-awareness in context … Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  5. 5. Contextual & Varying views of IL Australia Thailand Syria Work context Disciplinary Country Marketing academics At the heart of things: the person in context Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  6. 6. Information literate person Information economy: •Law •Changes in media •Pricing etc Organisational culture: •Mission; Values; Norms •Management style; ways of working •Information strategy Personal goals, relationships, habits, special needs Local & national culture & society Technical changes The information literate person in a changing information culture and society Personal context Johnston & Webber 2013 Based on Webber and Johnston, 2000
  7. 7. Examples Personal goals: Qualification through Part-time study Organisational culture: •Group work collaboration •Coursework requirements
  8. 8. Information economy: Personal goals, habits, special needs Local & national culture & society Technical changes Sheila in a changing information culture and society Family member has Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and has become physically frail Organisational cultureUniversity of Sheffield Organisations I need to know more about New Roles - e.g. Head of research group New Systems - e.g. Pebblepad New processes - e.g. Doctoral Development Programme - Move to online provision of Government information - Cuts in social services Open access - Open Educational Resources; MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) - New systems - Corporate/Individual options with Google services Sheila Local authorities - Care service companies - COLRIC IFLA – project on the Profile of the information literacy professional Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  9. 9. Some questions • What information / information literacy needs arise? • Do I need to develop my own information literacy to deal with these new / changed needs? • What do I need to do to meet these needs? • Are there things that I need to get/help others to do? – Intrapersonal and interpersonal information literacy • How information literate are the people/ organisations I’m dealing with? • Who is impacted if I do or don’t address these information literacy needs? Me? Other people? Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  10. 10. Example from my map • AMD – Information to do with the medical condition – Information to do with care and support for family member (local and national agencies) – Information on companies/charities that sell/provide products & services for the partially sighted • Development needs include – Finding out about new organisations - How do they disseminate information? What’s the best way to communicate with them? How “information literate” are they? Do I know people who have connections with them? Development implications not just for me Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  11. 11. Activity with librarians 1. Create your own map of changes, using the elements in the diagram "The information literate person in a changing information culture and society“ 2. Share it with your group: are your maps similar or different? can you help each other identify ways of meeting IL needs? 3. Identify ways in which you might address your needs e.g. in terms of development or training 4. Draw out training and development implications that you feel your university should be addressing 5. Summarise needs/proposals on a slide Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  12. 12. Activity with students 1. Create your own map of changes, using the elements in the diagram "The information literate person in a changing information culture and society” 2. Share it with your team: are your maps similar or different? can you help each other identify ways of meeting IL needs? 3. Write a team blog post about a factor/ Information Literacy need that you are willing to share on the blog 4. Individually, note down a plan to address some of your Information Literacy development needs. Please finish this after the class, if you do not complete it in class Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  13. 13. Curriculum perspectives Holistic institutional view – Course design – Pedagogy – Content – Processes – Interactions – Connections to wider social, economic and cultural influences Personal view – Lifecourse design – Self-awareness – Personal choice to engage with organisation/ community/ person to enable your personal curriculum for IL – Powerful tradition of people teaching themselves Goal: Situational awareness rather than “transfer of skills” Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  14. 14. Ways forward • If mission to help people become more information literate citizens (which may be a perspective shift for librarians /educators) what do we need to do differently? • Does it involve librarians repositioning themselves – e.g. involvement in redundancy/retirement process – Consulting/counselling relationship – All librarians with lifelong learning role – Opportunity spotting • Looking at life-stages – where are the support gaps? Sheila Webber / Bill Johnston, 2013
  15. 15. • Lifelong Learning initiatives • OERs • Apps • MOOCs Possible enablers
  16. 16. Sheila Webber Information School University of Sheffield s.webber@shef.ac.uk Twitter: @sheilayoshikawa http://information-literacy.blogspot.com/ http://www.slideshare.net/sheilawebber/ Bill Johnston Honorary Research Fellow University of Strathclyde b.johnston@strath.ac.uk Photos and graphics: Sheila Webber
  17. 17. References • Kelly, B. (2013) When Staff and Researchers Leave Their Host Institution. UK Web focus, 22 March. http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/when-staff-and- researchers-leave-their-host-institution/ • Johnston, B. (2010) The first year at university: teaching students in transition. Open University Press. • Schuller, T. & Watson, D. (2009) Learning Through Life: Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning (IFLL). Leicester: National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE). • Webber, S. and Johnston, B. (2000) Conceptions of information literacy: new perspectives and implications. Journal of information science, 26 (6), 381-397 • Webber, S. and Johnston, B. (2013) Transforming IL for HE in the 21st century: a Lifelong Learning approach. in Hepworth, M. and Walton, G. (Eds.) Developing people's information capabilities fostering information literacy in educational, workplace and community contexts. Emerald. [in press]

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