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How to make (and keep) our digital education resolutions in 2020

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Keynote lecture, Heriot Watt University, 8 January 2020

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How to make (and keep) our digital education resolutions in 2020

  1. 1. How to Make (and Keep) Our Digital Education Resolutions in 2020 Sheila MacNeill, 8 January 2020, Heriot Watt University #LTAResolutions #LTAResolutions
  2. 2. Titles and narrative common language stories we create and share. This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY
  3. 3. New Year Resolutions
  4. 4. Image:https://www.flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/370079666
  5. 5. Balancing small changes with big ideas/strategies This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY
  6. 6. Titles and narrative common language stories we create and share. This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY
  7. 7. The “digital”
  8. 8. Digital first? www.menti.com code: 80-15-18
  9. 9. “we believe that digital should be seen less as a thing and more a way of doing things. To help make this definition more concrete, we’ve broken it down into three attributes: creating value at the new frontiers of the business world, creating value in the processes that execute a vision of customer experiences, and building foundational capabilities that support the entire structure.” What ‘Digital’ Really Means. McKinsey & Company. https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/technology-media-and- telecommunications/our-insights/what-digital-really-means, 2019
  10. 10. Context
  11. 11. Inspiring Learning: vision, focus, priorities • Vision - designed to encapsulate the University’s aspiration that its strategic developments will provide a stimulating, enriching learning experience and will develop critical learning to learn capabilities • Focus – the Heriot-Watt Graduate will be the focal and end point of the Learning and Teaching Strategy, and at the centre of developing and delivering the Strategy • Priorities - a series of institution-wide initiatives and developments, encapsulated as Curriculum, Teaching and Assessment, the three key elements essential to delivering the Inspiring Learning strategic vision
  12. 12. Themes: Global will be recognised as an inherent feature of learning and teaching at HWU; Students will recognise themselves as part of a vibrant local and global learning community, in which their learning is developed and facilitated by a global teaching team informed by academic and industrial perspectives from Scotland, Dubai and Malaysia; Students will have choices in how they acquire their education, including opportunities to combine modes and locations of study; academic staff will have a full and equal part in a global teaching team, enabling teaching and collaboration across campuses to be seamless and integrated;
  13. 13. Student wellbeing Staff wellbeing and care Digital wellbeing
  14. 14. Digital Wellbeing “the impact of technologies and digital services on people’s mental, physical, social and emotional health. It is a complex concept that can be viewed from a variety of perspectives and across different contexts and situations” Jisc , 2019 (https://digitalcapability.jisc.ac.uk/what-is-digital- capability/digital-wellbeing/)
  15. 15. Themes: Time Student wellbeing Technology, space and facilities Institutional culture
  16. 16. Themes: Time Inspiring Learning is designed to encapsulate the University’s aspiration that its strategic developments will provide a stimulating, enriching learning experience and will develop critical learning to learn capabilities designed to emphasise the criticality of developing the learning capabilities of students through the curriculum, teaching and assessment.
  17. 17. Re-centering “the digital” Conceptualising the Digital University: the intersection of policy, pedagogy and practice, (Johnson, MacNeill, Smyth, 2019)
  18. 18. Digital Participation Information Literacy  Glocalization  Widening Access  Civic role and responsibilities  Networks (human and digital)  Technological Affordances  High Level concepts and perceptions influencing practice  Staff and student engagement/development  Effective development and use of infrastructure Curriculum and Course Design Learning Environments  Constructive alignment  Curriculum representations, course, management, pedagogical innovation  Recruitment and marketing  Reporting, data, analytics  Physical and Digital  Pedagogical and social  Research and enquiry  Staff and resources Conceptual Matrix for the Digital University, MacNeill & Johnston, 2012
  19. 19. Academic development and open education at the heart of organisational development • Revised conceptual matrix,, MacNeill, Johntson, Smyth, (2019 )
  20. 20. Critically engaged academic development as a key part of digital transformation Academic development as critical practice – central to digital transformation Utilise porosity between academic developers, educational developers, learning technologists Challenge structures current CPD/professional recognition/metrics are modelling
  21. 21. The curriculum as an open and negotiated space
  22. 22. Porosity (2) Open scholarship (2) Co-location(2) Co-production(2) Participation Public pedagogy Praxis (1) (3) Designed physical and digital learning spaces Self-selected digital learning spaces Formal and informal learning communities Public third spaces Digital third spaces (3) Negotiation and agency Difference and diversity Curation and creation Vertical and horizontal learning engagement Sustainable pedagogies Reflexive dialogue The Digitally Distributed Curriculum (1) Values (2) Enabling dimensions (3) Instantiation and enactment of DDC (3) Digital artefacts Collaborative public projects Student digital scholarship Digital knowledge domains (3) Open textbooks and resources Open online engagement Open campus engagement Open in the community Fluid curriculum
  23. 23. Curriculum as unbounded open equitable critically informed
  24. 24. What next? how to create a shared digital first reality? Time Care Criticality Context
  25. 25. Share just one thing . . . http://bit.ly/2Zsnu5a
  26. 26. Thank you sheilamacneill@me.com @sheilmcn https://howsheilaseesit.net/ #LTAResolutions
  27. 27. References • Collini, S. (2017). Speaking of Universities. London/New York: Verso. • Freire, P. (1974). Education for critical consciousness. London: Bloomsbury Academic an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc. • Giroux, H. A. (2000). Public Pedagogy and the Responsibility of Intellectuals: Youth, Littleton, and the Loss of Innocence. JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, 20(1), 9–42. • Hall, R. and Smyth, K. (2016). Dismantling the Curriculum in Higher Education. Open Library of Humanities, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.16995/olh.66. • Jones, C., & Goodfellow, R. (2012). The “digital university”: Discourse, Theory, and Evidence. International Journal of Learning and Media, 4(3–4), 59–63. • Johnston, B., MacNeill, S., & Smyth, K. (2018). Conceptualising the digital university: the intersection of policy, pedagogy and practice. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. • Oldenburg, R. (1989). The Great Good Place: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Bookstores, Bars, Hair Salons, and Other Hangouts at the Heart of a Community. New York: Marlowe and Company. • Vermunt, J. D. (2007). The Power of Teaching-Learning Environments to Influence Student Learning. British Journal of Educational Psychology, Monograph Series II, 4, 73–90.
  28. 28. Questions and discussion #LTAResolutions
  29. 29. Forthcoming events Tech for Teaching Workshop: 21st January, 2.15-4.15pm, GRID, Edinburgh Campus E-Assessment Masterclass: 26th February, Online Open Educational Practices Masterclass: 3rd March, Online and Edinburgh Campus Digital Education School-based Workshops: March / April HWU Learning and Teaching Week w/c 8th June, all campuses Find out more at www.lta.hw.ac.uk/events #LTAResolutions

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