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Differentiated Instruction for Teaching Artists

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Differentiated Instruction
          for Teaching Artists


                                  with
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Objectives for this Seminar

• Introduction to the concept of
  Differentiated Instruction
• Provide examples and resource...

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Our Agenda for today

• Presentation on basic concepts of
  Differentiated Instruction
• Short Break – Room change
• Conti...

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Differentiated Instruction for Teaching Artists

Differentiation Instruction is a classroom practice that recognizes the reality that students differ and the most effective teachers do whatever it takes to hook the whole range of kids on learning. When a teacher tries to teach something to the entire class at the same time, chances are
– One-third of the students already know it
– One-third of the students will get it
– One-third of students will not get it

So two-thirds of the students are not in an optimal place for learning.

Much of what we already do in the Arts is Differentiated Instruction. So only minor changes are necessary for teaching artists to adapt and use these techniques with their students.

Differentiation Instruction is a classroom practice that recognizes the reality that students differ and the most effective teachers do whatever it takes to hook the whole range of kids on learning. When a teacher tries to teach something to the entire class at the same time, chances are
– One-third of the students already know it
– One-third of the students will get it
– One-third of students will not get it

So two-thirds of the students are not in an optimal place for learning.

Much of what we already do in the Arts is Differentiated Instruction. So only minor changes are necessary for teaching artists to adapt and use these techniques with their students.

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Differentiated Instruction for Teaching Artists

  1. 1. Differentiated Instruction for Teaching Artists with Harlan Brownlee www.ArtsInEducation.net www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012
  2. 2. Objectives for this Seminar • Introduction to the concept of Differentiated Instruction • Provide examples and resources for Differentiated Instruction • Provide time for participants to brainstorm potential application and • Changes to their current teaching practice and lesson design www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 2
  3. 3. Our Agenda for today • Presentation on basic concepts of Differentiated Instruction • Short Break – Room change • Continuation of presentation on basic concepts of Differentiated Instruction • Reflection Questions • Time to brainstorm with peers • Reflections Questions www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 3
  4. 4. How and Why would a Teaching Artist want to use Differentiated Instruction • Edu-talk – Another way in with teachers – Tool of value & benefit for teachers & schools • Much of what we already do in the Arts is Differentiated Instruction – So only minor changes are necessary for us to adapt and use these techniques with our students www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 4
  5. 5. What is Differentiated Instruction? One way to think about differentiation – Differentiation is classroom practice that recognizes the reality that students differ – and the most effective teachers do whatever it takes to hook the whole range of kids on learning www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 5
  6. 6. The thirds rule When a teacher tries to teach something to the entire class at the same time: – Chances are • One-third of the students already know it • One-third of the students will get it • One-third of students will not get it – So two-thirds of the students are not in an optimal place for learning www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 6
  7. 7. The Role of the Teacher • Getting Students in the Zone – Too Easy • I get it right away… • I already know how... – Too Hard • I do not where to start… • I can not figure it out... – On Target • I know some things… • I have to think or work at this…. www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 7
  8. 8. Strands of Differentiation – Teachers can differentiate by • Content • Process • Product – Or according to student’s • Readiness • Interest • Learning style www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 8
  9. 9. A Visual Model of Differentiation Teachers can According to the differentiate by... student’s... CONTENT READINESS PROCESS INTEREST PRODUCT LEARNING STYLE www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 9
  10. 10. The How To’s of planning lessons by Student Readiness • Foundational to Transformational – Moving from rote understanding to application to prediction • Concrete to Abstract – Moving from key information to layered understanding and use of metaphor and analogy • Simple to Complex – Big picture to filling in with detail • Structured to Open-Ended – Moving from tasks that are broken down in predetermined format to ones requiring less structure and more creativity • Dependent to Independent – Moving from teacher generated options to student generated options • Giving students varying degrees of choice www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 10
  11. 11. The How To’s of planning lessons by Student Interest • Provide room for exploration within the curriculum to be taught – Giving students some freedom for exploration while also covering required curriculum content • Interest mapping- What do you want to learn about….? • Provide structure that leads to student success – Setting goals, timelines, & milestones • Have students share their interests – Student presentations in groups or by individual • Create an open inviation for student interests – Welcome student ideas and let them know you want to know what they are interested in www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 11
  12. 12. The How To’s of planning lessons by Student Learning Profile • Intelligence Preferences – Remember that some, but not all, of your students share your learning preference • Culture-Influenced Preferences – Belief structures and values influence how we prefer to learn or what we value in the learning experience • Gender-Based Preferences – Be aware of assumptions that we make about gender differences • Combined Preferences – Help students identify their own preferences www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 12
  13. 13. Teachers can differentiate by... Content • Concept-Based Teaching – Emphasize key ideas – not minutia – Stress how this information is relevant to the students • Why do you need to know or be able to do this • Curriculum Compacting – Three step process • Ask students what do you know or can do for a particular curriculum concept • How can you learn what you do not know or can not do for that particular curriculum concept? • What do you want to learn with your free or unstructured time? www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 13
  14. 14. Teachers can differentiate by... Process • Students make or do something as a tiered activity – In a range of modes at varied degrees of sophistication in varying time spans – with varied amounts of teacher or peer support – Using essential skills and essential information www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 14
  15. 15. Teachers can differentiate by... Process (continued) • Readiness – Matching the complexity of a task to a students current level of understanding and skill • Interest – Giving students choices about facets of a topic in which they have a personal interest • Learning Profile – Encouraging students to learn in the way that they learn best www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 15
  16. 16. Teachers can differentiate by... Product • Serves as demonstration of what a student has learned and can do • Ask students to create products that synthesize multiple sources of information • Be sure to communicate clear guidelines or criteria for what is considered high quality work • Be sure to share products with other students, school personnel, parents, & community members www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 16
  17. 17. Creating Learning Profiles • Developing surveys and pre-assessments – How do you learn? – What do you want to learn? – What do you know? • Surveys can be highly structured or more open ended – Rate an activity on your level of interest – Tell me what you are excited to learn about www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 17
  18. 18. Range of Activities • Whole-Class Activities – Pre-assessment readiness/interest – Introduction of concepts – Planning – Sharing – Reflection • Small Group Activities (2-4 students) – Sense-making (making meaning) – Teaching Skills – Practice & applying skills - rehearsal – Planning – Investigation www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 18
  19. 19. Instructional Strategy - Flexible Grouping • Students are part of different groups & work alone • Students are grouped by interest, readiness, or learning profile • Sometimes teachers select groups or sometimes students select groups www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 19
  20. 20. Instructional Strategy - Flexible Grouping • Allows students to take on different roles depending on the grouping • Be sure students work with similar and dissimilar peers • Be sure that there are clear guidelines for group functioning www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 20
  21. 21. Checklist for Group Work • Students understand the task goals • Students know what’s expected of individuals to make the group work well • Most students should find the task interesting and meaningful www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 21
  22. 22. Checklist for Group Work • The task is likely to be demanding of the group and it members • The task requires genuine collaboration to achieve shared understanding www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 22
  23. 23. Checklist for Group Work • Time lines are brisk, but not rigid • Individuals are accountable for their own understanding of all facets of the task • There is a “way out” for students who are not succeeding with the group • Students understand what to do next after they complete their work at a high level of quality www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 23
  24. 24. Tiered Lesson • Varied levels of activities for exploration of essential ideas – Use a variety of resource materials at differing levels of complexity and associated with different leaning modalities • Choice: a great motivator • Allows students to begin learning from where they are • Monitor student progress and – adjust complexity, abstractness, number of steps, concreteness, and independence to ensure an appropriate challenge www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 24
  25. 25. Ongoing Assessment • Observation • Asking questions • Student demonstration or product • Teacher or student checklists and/or rubrics www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 25
  26. 26. Strategies for Managing a Differentiated Instruction • Have a clear rationale of why and how you are differentiating • Begin differentiating at a pace that is comfortable to you • Use an “anchor activity” to free you up to focus your attention on your students www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 26
  27. 27. Strategies for Managing a Differentiated Instruction • Create and deliver instructions clearly • Have a system for assigning students to various groups • Have a plan for quick finishers • Have a plan for students who do not finish www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 27
  28. 28. Reflection • Three things you learned • Two things you will consider using or changing in your workshop / performance / classroom • One question you still have www.ArtsInEducation.net © S. Harlan Brownlee, All Rights Reserved 2012 28

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