Classroom Management for                 Teaching ArtistsCreating a Learning Environment                  With            ...
A Case Study-Pair/Share– A Contagious Situation   • In what ways has Ms. Cornell planned for her classroom in     advance?...
Possible Reasons• Ms. Cornell has identified her instructional  objectives and developed numerous lesson  plans and activi...
Possible Reasons• Ms. Cornell begins the curriculum she has planned on the  very first day of school, before students have...
Possible Reasons• The students have pent-up energy that needs to be released  – an unmet physiological need.• It’s possibl...
Possible Reasons• The three students are being reinforced for such behavior  by the attention they are getting from their ...
Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Arranging the classroom  – Spatial arrangement  – Student arrangement• Crea...
Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Planning activities that keep students on task  – Challenging/ but not too ...
Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Overlapping   – Doing more than one thing at a time      • Cueing a student...
Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Be honest with students   – Teachers and students alike should express thei...
Learning Activity• Develop a short list of rules that a teacher at  the elementary or secondary (groups choice)  might use...
Effective Classroom Management Strategies• Ms. Schutz describes three major  assignments that students in her literature  ...
Effective Classroom Management Strategies• When Mr. Dembrowski must take a few  minutes to help Stacey with a difficult ma...
Effective Classroom Management Strategies• Ms. Smith’s middle school social studies  students know that when they first ge...
Strategies for Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Ignoring  –   Behavior unlikely to be repeated  –   Behavior unlikely to ...
Strategies for Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Private discussion  – Cueing has been ineffective  – Reasons for behavior...
Strategies for Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Behaviorist approaches (reinforcement)  – Behavior has continued over tim...
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Pair/Share Activity                        www.ArtsInEducation.net
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Mr. Marzetta notices that Janie is doodling  in her notebook during his explanation of  ...
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• At the end of art class, Eric is so busy  talking to someone else that he has  forgotten...
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Although Jerri willingly completes tasks that she can  do at her desk or in small cooper...
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Missy clicks her ballpoint pen constantly during class,  to the point where the students...
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Heidi is physically aggressive toward her classmates whenever  things don’t go her way. ...
Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Ms. Schweck finds Andrew sleeping in her class  two or three times a week. When she spea...
Gradual Release of Responsibility    T   S    T   S     T       S                           www.ArtsInEducation.net
Example Activity• Hand sculptures  – Ground rules• Body Twister  – Ground rules• Function following Form  – Engaging imagi...
Reflection• What classroom management strategies did  I incorporate into the previous activity?• Which strategies discusse...
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Classroom Management for Teaching Artists - Creating a Learning Environment

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How do we learn about the world? How do we express who we are? The arts, by their very nature, present an opportunity to engage the imagination of students and can create a learning environment where students connect all of their talents and skills in a successful manner.

This workshop designed specifically for Teaching Artists introduces concepts and practices for creating an environment conducive to learning. Based on classroom management strategies and practical application, the workshop asks participants to integrate concepts presented into arts activities and then reflect on them.

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Classroom Management for Teaching Artists - Creating a Learning Environment

  1. 1. Classroom Management for Teaching ArtistsCreating a Learning Environment With Harlan Brownlee www.ArtsInEducation.netCopyright S. Harlan Brownlee: No copying or other reproduction of this work allowed without the express written permission of the author, ©2012
  2. 2. A Case Study-Pair/Share– A Contagious Situation • In what ways has Ms. Cornell planned for her classroom in advance? In what ways has she not planned? • Why are Eli, Jake, and Vanessa so disruptive right from the start? Can you think you think of possible reasons related to how Ms. Cornell has begun the school year? Can you think of possible reasons related to the activities related to the activities Ms. Cornell has planned? • Why does the misbehavior of the three problem students continue? Why does it spread to the other students in the classroom? Why is it particularly common during downtimes in the school day? Can you answer these questions based on your own personal experience and observations? www.ArtsInEducation.net
  3. 3. Possible Reasons• Ms. Cornell has identified her instructional objectives and developed numerous lesson plans and activities that should help her students accomplish those objectives. But she has not developed a plan for creating and maintaining an environment conducive to learning. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  4. 4. Possible Reasons• Ms. Cornell begins the curriculum she has planned on the very first day of school, before students have had a chance to settle in and fell comfortable in their new classroom. Teachers should typically begin the school year with easy, enjoyable tasks that allow a pleasant and supportive classroom climate to be established• Ms. Cornell may be presenting especially difficult material and tasks. Students are more likely to misbehave when they are asked to do things that are probably too difficult for them• Ms. Cornell does not set limits regarding classroom behavior. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  5. 5. Possible Reasons• The students have pent-up energy that needs to be released – an unmet physiological need.• It’s possible that Ms. Cornell’s expectations for performance are unclear, generating anxiety for the students.• The students don’t see the relevance of classroom subject matter to their own lives (motivation).• The students don’t believe that they are capable of being successful at classroom tasks and activities (i.e., they have low self-efficacy) because they have had a string of failures in previous years. When students attribute their failures in a particular activity to a lack of ability, they are unlikely to exert effort in that activity. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  6. 6. Possible Reasons• The three students are being reinforced for such behavior by the attention they are getting from their classmates.• Ms. Cornell is doing nothing to dissuade them from behaving as they do. Other students may be starting to behave in a similar fashion either because of vicarious reinforcement (Eli, Jake, and Vanessa are getting a lot of attention from peers) or because of the nonoccurrence of expected punishment (something that is actually reinforcing)• The misbehavior may be especially common during down times because there is little going on to keep students’ attention focused on academic endeavors or to reinforce them for appropriate behavior. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  7. 7. Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Arranging the classroom – Spatial arrangement – Student arrangement• Creating an effective classroom climate – Mood / Music• Setting limits – Rules / Reinforcement / Consistency www.ArtsInEducation.net
  8. 8. Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Planning activities that keep students on task – Challenging/ but not too difficult – Differentiated Learning• Monitoring what students are doing – Withitness• Modifying instructional strategies when necessary – Improvising when necessary – Like the actor – reading your audience and adjusting www.ArtsInEducation.net
  9. 9. Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Overlapping – Doing more than one thing at a time • Cueing a student about inappropriate behavior while simultaneously conducting a lesson• Smoothness & momentum – Moving through a lesson from one activity to another smoothly and with unnecessary pauses or slow-downs • Directing questions to potentially disruptive students• Group alerting – Keeping all student attentive and involved in classroom activities • Asking all student to respond in unison to a question • Calling on any student at any time – no hand raising www.ArtsInEducation.net
  10. 10. Creating an Environment Conducive to Learning• Be honest with students – Teachers and students alike should express their beliefs and feelings openly and candidly.• Communicate acceptance – Students should believe their teacher accepts and respects them as valued and worthwhile human beings, despite any mistakes or shortcomings they may have.• Be empathic – Teachers should try to see the world through students’ eyes and attempt to understand students’ individual perspective and needs. They should be understanding and supportive rather than critical and judgmental. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  11. 11. Learning Activity• Develop a short list of rules that a teacher at the elementary or secondary (groups choice) might use to start out the year.• Develop several good activities for getting students actively engaged on the first day of school. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  12. 12. Effective Classroom Management Strategies• Ms. Schutz describes three major assignments that students in her literature class must complete during the semester, and together she and her students come to an agreement about a reasonable due date for each assignment.• Effective – This strategy gives students a sense of control over their classroom life and thereby promotes intrinsic motivation. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  13. 13. Effective Classroom Management Strategies• When Mr. Dembrowski must take a few minutes to help Stacey with a difficult math problem, he turns his chair so that he can simultaneously watch his other students working quietly at their desks.• Effective – Ideally, a teacher should be able to see what all students are doing at all times. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  14. 14. Effective Classroom Management Strategies• Ms. Smith’s middle school social studies students know that when they first get to class, they should take out their journals and write their reactions to a news event described either in yesterday’s newspaper or on last night local television news program.• Effective – This procedure gives students something to do during a transition time. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  15. 15. Strategies for Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Ignoring – Behavior unlikely to be repeated – Behavior unlikely to spread – Unusual circumstances trigger the behavior – Behavior does not seriously interfere with learning• Cueing – Behavior is a minor infraction but interferes with learning – Behavior likely to change with subtle reminder www.ArtsInEducation.net
  16. 16. Strategies for Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Private discussion – Cueing has been ineffective – Reasons for behavior might suggest strategies for change• Promoting self-regulation – Student has a strong desire to improve behavior www.ArtsInEducation.net
  17. 17. Strategies for Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Behaviorist approaches (reinforcement) – Behavior has continued over time and significantly interferes with learning – Student seems unwilling or unable to self- regulate• Parent Conference – Source of problem may lie outside of school – Parents probably willing to collaborate www.ArtsInEducation.net
  18. 18. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Pair/Share Activity www.ArtsInEducation.net
  19. 19. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Mr. Marzetta notices that Janie is doodling in her notebook during his explanation of the water cycle. He is surprised to find her doing so, because she is a good student who always performs well on assignments and quizzes.• Ignoring: Janie’s behavior does not appear to be interfering with her learning. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  20. 20. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• At the end of art class, Eric is so busy talking to someone else that he has forgotten to clean his pottery wheel.• Cueing: Eric simply needs a reminder about appropriate behavior. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  21. 21. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Although Jerri willingly completes tasks that she can do at her desk or in small cooperative groups, she consistently refuses when Mr. Jones asks her to do anything that involves speaking in front of the entire class.• Private discussion; Jerri seems motivated to do well in school, as evidenced by her willingness to complete other tasks. Yet repeated cueing has not produced a change in her attitude toward public speaking tasks. By talking privately with Jerri, Mr. Jones may be able to find out why she balks at such tasks. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  22. 22. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Missy clicks her ballpoint pen constantly during class, to the point where the students around her are being distracted and annoyed. Over the past few weeks, Ms. Givens has repeatedly asked Missy to stop the behavior, but it continues unabated. Missy tells her teacher, “I know I should stop, Ms. Givens, but most of the time I don’t even realize I’m doing it.”• Self-regulation. Missy is motivated to change her behavior. Ms. Givens might have Missy begin with self-monitoring, recording each click she catches herself making. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  23. 23. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Heidi is physically aggressive toward her classmates whenever things don’t go her way. Elliot has talked with her about her behavior several times but has seen little improvement in her behavior. Heidi seems to have little interest in changing how she interacts with other students.• A behaviorist approach: Heidi’s behavior is interfering with school activities and is potentially jeopardizing the safety of others. Cueing hasn’t worked, and Heidi isn’t motivated to change on her own. Mr. Elliott might try to extinguish or punish aggressive behavior (e.g., with time-out) and then teach and reinforce more appropriate behaviors. He might also try to determine if aggressive behavior serves some purpose for Heidi and, if so, teach her alternative ways of satisfying her needs. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  24. 24. Dealing with Student Misbehavior• Ms. Schweck finds Andrew sleeping in her class two or three times a week. When she speaks with Andrew about the problem, he tells her that he really enjoys her class and wishes he could stay awake. He says that he often has trouble falling asleep at night and so is quite tired in school the following day.• Parent conference: A private discussion with the student has been ineffective, and the source of the problem appears to lie outside school walls. www.ArtsInEducation.net
  25. 25. Gradual Release of Responsibility T S T S T S www.ArtsInEducation.net
  26. 26. Example Activity• Hand sculptures – Ground rules• Body Twister – Ground rules• Function following Form – Engaging imagination• Form following Function – Working within structure www.ArtsInEducation.net
  27. 27. Reflection• What classroom management strategies did I incorporate into the previous activity?• Which strategies discussed and reviewed today will you be able to utilize in your classroom and in what manner? www.ArtsInEducation.net

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