PACKAGE DESIGN (Intro to GD, wk 12)

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Week 12, Introduction to Package Design

Presentation from Introduction to Graphic Design, Columbia College Chicago. Much of the content taken from readings, including the textbooks: Timothy Samara's "Design Elements" and "Design Evolution." Other references cited in presentation. Please note: many slides are intended for class discussion and might not make sense out of context.

Published in: Design, Business

PACKAGE DESIGN (Intro to GD, wk 12)

  1. 1. I N T R O T O PA C K A G I N G D E S I G N
  2. 2. DOUBLE FUNCTION
  3. 3. DOUBLE FUNCTION 1. Pr actical/physical
  4. 4. DOUBLE FUNCTION 1. Pr actical/physical 2. Psych olo gic al
  5. 5. PRACTICAL/PHYSICAL
  6. 6. PRACTICAL/PHYSICAL Storage and protec tion of goo ds
  7. 7. PRACTICAL/PHYSICAL Storage and protec tion of goo ds Sh ipping
  8. 8. PRACTICAL/PHYSICAL Storage and protec tion of goo ds Sh ipping Dis play
  9. 9. PRACTICAL/PHYSICAL Storage and protec tion of goo ds Sh ipping Dis play Pres en t te xtual infor m ation
  10. 10. PRACTICAL/PHYSICAL Storage and protec tion of goo ds Sh ipping Dis play Pres en t te xtual infor m ation Del ive r y
  11. 11. PSYCHOLOGICAL
  12. 12. PSYCHOLOGICAL Brandin g/Identit y
  13. 13. PSYCHOLOGICAL Brandin g/Identit y Consume r desire
  14. 14. Brand ≠ Products Marketing groups often talk about managing their brands, but what they usually mean is managing their products. To manage a brand is to manage something much less tangible—an aura, and invisible layer of meaning that surrounds the product.
  15. 15. WHY DO YOU BUY ON E PRODUCT OVER ANOTH ER?
  16. 16. WHY DO YOU BUY ON E experience PRODUCT OVER ANOTH ER?
  17. 17. WHY DO YOU BUY ON E experience PRODUCT OVER ANOTH ER? brand promise
  18. 18. WHY DO YOU BUY ON E experience PRODUCT OVER ANOTH ER? brand promise brand loyalty
  19. 19. WHY DO YOU BUY ON E experience PRODUCT OVER ANOTH ER? brand promise brand loyalty packaging
  20. 20. PACKAGING IS NOT JUST VISUA L — WHAT MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE?
  21. 21. PACKAGING IS NOT shape of th e package JUST VISUA L — WHAT MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE?
  22. 22. PACKAGING IS NOT shape of th e package JUST VISUA L — WHAT the “fit” in the han d MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE?
  23. 23. PACKAGING IS NOT shape of th e package JUST VISUA L — WHAT the “fit” in the han d MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE? the texture
  24. 24. PACKAGING IS NOT shape of th e package JUST VISUA L — WHAT the “fit” in the han d MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE? the texture the finish
  25. 25. PACKAGING IS NOT shape of th e package JUST VISUA L — WHAT the “fit” in the han d MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE? the texture the finish the perceived weight
  26. 26. PACKAGING IS NOT shape of th e package JUST VISUA L — WHAT the “fit” in the han d MAKES AN ATTR ACT IVE PACKAGE? the texture the finish the perceived weight the graph ics
  27. 27. “LUXURY”
  28. 28. “LUXURY” Limited color palette (jet black bottle, creamy white label and rich red seal).
  29. 29. “LUXURY” Limited color palette (jet black bottle, creamy white label and rich red seal). Texture (glossy bottle, uncoated paper label and deeply embossed real wax seal).
  30. 30. “LUXURY” Limited color palette (jet black bottle, creamy white label and rich red seal). Texture (glossy bottle, uncoated paper label and deeply embossed real wax seal). Less is more (the only clues about 'who' and  'when' are the logo in the seal and the artful '2005' on the label).
  31. 31. C A S E S T U D Y: TA R G E T
  32. 32. The problem:
  33. 33. The problem: Inconsisten t labelin g
  34. 34. The problem: Inconsisten t labelin g Branding tr umps all
  35. 35. The problem: Inconsisten t labelin g Branding tr umps all Confusing n umbers
  36. 36. The problem: Inconsisten t labelin g Branding tr umps all Confusing n umbers Poor color combinations.
  37. 37. The problem: Inconsisten t labelin g Branding tr umps all Confusing n umbers Poor color combinations. Cur ved shape is hard to r e ad.
  38. 38. The problem: Inconsisten t labelin g Branding tr umps all Confusing n umbers Poor color combinations. Cur ved shape is hard to r e ad. Tiny type
  39. 39. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features:
  40. 40. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 1. Easy I.D. The name of the drug is printed on the top of the bottle, so it’s visible if kept in a drawer.
  41. 41. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 1. Easy I.D. The name of the drug is printed on the top of the bottle, so it’s visible if kept in a drawer. 2. Code red The red color of the bottle if Target’s signature, and a universal symbol for caution.
  42. 42. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 1. Easy I.D. The name of the drug is printed on the top of the bottle, so it’s visible if kept in a drawer. 2. Code red The red color of the bottle if Target’s signature, and a universal symbol for caution. 3. Information hierarchy Adler divided the label into primary and secondary positions, separated by a horizontal line. The most important information (drug name, dosage, intake instructions) is placed above the line, and less important data (quantity, expiration date, doctor’s name) is positioned below.
  43. 43. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features:
  44. 44. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 4. Upside-down to save paper Klaus Rosburg, a Brooklyn-based industrial designer hired by Target, came up with an upside-down version that stands on its cap, so that the label can be wrapped around the top. Every piece of paper in the package adds up to one eight-and-a-half-by-fourteen- inch perforated sheet, which eliminates waste and makes life easier for pharmacists.
  45. 45. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 4. Upside-down to save paper Klaus Rosburg, a Brooklyn-based industrial designer hired by Target, came up with an upside-down version that stands on its cap, so that the label can be wrapped around the top. Every piece of paper in the package adds up to one eight-and-a-half-by-fourteen- inch perforated sheet, which eliminates waste and makes life easier for pharmacists. 5. Green is for grandma Adler and Rosburg developed a system of six colored rubber rings that attach to the neck of the bottle. Family members choose their own identifying shade, so medications in a shared bathroom will never get mixed up.
  46. 46. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features:
  47. 47. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 6. An info card that is hard to lose A card with more detailed information on a drug (common uses, side effects) is now tucked behind the label. A separate, expanded patient-education sheet, designed by Adler, comes with three holes so it can be saved in a binder for reference.
  48. 48. The solution: Designed as a thesis project by 29 year old School of Visuals Arts (NYC) grad, the new pill bottle design features: 6. An info card that is hard to lose A card with more detailed information on a drug (common uses, side effects) is now tucked behind the label. A separate, expanded patient-education sheet, designed by Adler, comes with three holes so it can be saved in a binder for reference. 7. Clear warnings Adler decided that many of the existing warning symbols stuck on pill bottles don’t make much sense—the sign for “take on an empty stomach,” for instance, looked like a gas tank to her—so together with graphic designer Milton Glaser, for whom she now works, she revamped the 25 most important.
  49. 49. CRITERIA FOR A SUCCESSFUL LOGO DE SIGN G E PA CKA
  50. 50. Visibility
  51. 51. Application
  52. 52. Distinctiveness
  53. 53. Simplicity/Universality
  54. 54. Retention
  55. 55. Color
  56. 56. Descriptiveness
  57. 57. Timelessness
  58. 58. Modularity
  59. 59. Equity

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