Healthy Communities Partnership - Renfrew County - Sustainable Food System

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Development of a Renfrew County Sustainable Food System as a part of our policy development work with the Healthy Communities Partnership.

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  • What is our story in Renfrew County?Rural Challenges that we face – isolation, distance, planning, developmentWe know what determines our health – in our 2008 regional Call to Action – Dr. Pipe clearly states – our postal code determines our health What does this say about our communities - it speaks to multiple sector innovation / partnerships have a strong history in Ottawa Valley History & Investment in Our AssetsCall to Action took place in Oct. 2008 in response to the Renfrew County community heath report released by the Champlain LHINFocus was on the development of a multi sector network to address health through increased physical activity opportunities for prevention / rehab Based on the fact that 25% of chronic disease / illness is preventable and 25% is partially preventableFocus on accessible environments – built & natural environments – they were both accessible and a rich resource / asset that was available in every communityEG - trailswalking in the halls – a locally grown program – Get WITH It – using school hallways to promote fall / winter / spring season walking – addresses social isolation, safe spaces to walk, increase physical activity.History of investment in building on non traditional partnerships and the strength of collaborative. A host of unlikely suspects– builds on the strength of our local assets and increases community use of schools. Through the support of the Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport, we have widened our scope and developed a broader look at how we can collectively improve the health of our communities.Our County is vast (the largest in Renfrew County) and is filled with rich local strengths and strong championsWe valued what already existed and needed to understand the reality of our Picture of Health and a common vision, we can collectively improve our statistics, overall well being and quality of lifeCollectively, we developed the ‘Building Healthy Community’ – Community Picture document (copies will be circulated) and are working to improve the health, well being and quality of life of all participantsWe find ourselves here – with a strong common goal, growing engagement and lots of passion / impetusOur process was intuitive – community engagement / collective impactSo – how has the HCP project increased our collaborative efforts, provided an opportunity to focus on our collective impact and in turn work towards a shift in our health stats, health equity and quality of life for all.KEY piece - Non traditional partnership development (and trust in that collaboration) – high level decision makers / non traditional sectors / grassroots org’n & passion (Chief, Paramedic Service, Heart Institute – Heart Wise, KidActive – small NFP)Start here:Bill Clinton was recently talking about some of the most formidable problems facing the world today – poverty, the environment, health, economic instability. He said that to begin to solve these problems, “it starts with acknowledging that this is the most interdependent age in human history. One thing no one can change is our growing interdependence," he continued, " in a world of nets instead of brick walls, what happens in one place can affect another." In a world of interdependence, we have to work together in new, innovative ways to create opportunity and to solve problems. No one gets anything done without many groups of people collaborating, working together, co-operating. No one can do anything meaningful on their own in this interdependent world.One challenge with the collaboration imperative he cited is that collaboration isn’t always as exciting as the thrill of competition or the headlines that conflict can create. “What works is co-operation, he said however, “and if you want to be a transformational leader you’ve got to figure out how to make it profoundly interesting to co-operate.” Overview – Background – Partnership – non traditional – EG: Paramedic Service, Heart Institute (Heart Wise), KidActiveCollective Impact Concept:Common agenda     Shared measurement systems Mutually reinforcing activities Continuous communication Backbone support organizationsBuilding Healthy Community is a collaborative project of the Healthy Community PartnershipInitially funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport
  • Here for a couple of reasons:1. to share a history and story of how we (a collective group of individual community champions and organizations) are working together to make Renfrew County is the best place to raise a child, work, live, play and grow old. Our vision is to improve the health, well being and quality of life for everyone in Renfrew County.We need your input and feedback to do it well.Overview – Background – PartnershipPAN-RC – launch event in 2008 – Janice Visneskie was the WardenA co-ordinated network of multi sector community champions focused on action & working together to make it easier for people across Renfrew County to be more active and healthy – taking a preventative and multi sector approach to our health.Healthy Communities Partnership – 2011 – transformational arm working on policy development and making the connection between our health and well being and economic development (industry, tourism), recreation, property and development, education, social services and private business.
  • PAN-RC – multi sector / non-traditional partnership network working on shared goals:Community Paramedic- invested resource- visible role in communities across the County- education / awareness / skill development (self-management)-
  • In that space – create a vision This is our vision A healthy community – here are a few indicators – no poverty, less pressure on our paramedic service, more beds available in our hospitals more seniors able to live in the comforts of their home longer, children walking and biking to school, parks and green spaces in every neighbourhood, paved shoulders, decreased demand on our social services, adequate and affordable housing, people of all ages walking on our roads and trails To advance the work of the funded, non funded, traditional and non traditional community partnerships  Our goal is to build on our work to date through specific and measurable goals improve the overall health and well being of everyone How do we get there . . .  “If you want to be a transformational leader, you have got to figure out how to make it profoundly interesting to co-operate” FINDING SHARED LANGUAGE The value of understanding what speaks to individual or organizational goals and still remains consistent with our common goal Example – Engagement vs. Consultation
  • Priorities of the Waterloo Region’s Food System
  • Vancouver Food Policy Council
  • Principles here come from Vancouver Food Charter
  • Key Piece to Change – ownership & engagementHow do we focus on these priority areas and improve the health of our communities. It takes a collaborative effort.The Healthy Community Partnership believes in the following principles which contribute to building healthier communitiesLocal Community Strengths – “Who are we speaking to” Include seniors as volunteers Include youth Rich cultural heritage (knowledge to be shared by our senior population) Your input as valued members of our communities.BUY INAlign with other mandates – give EG – Paramedic Service – unsustainable demand for service – Community Paramedic Program – with focus on prevention and accessible rehab – a need“If you want to be a transformational leader, you have got to figure out how to make it profoundly interesting to co-operate”
  • Co-ordinated & Collaborative Approach Align with other mandates – give EG – Paramedic Service – unsustainable demand for service – Community Paramedic Program – with focus on prevention and accessible rehab – a need to be collectively addressed. SDOH in training / education system  Support and link existing networks, org’ns, projectsMultiplier effect – connect to existing mandates & workplans Contribute to community action projects Share an understanding of Social & Environmental Determinants of Health Communicate strategically & respectfully Co-ordinate goals & investments Definition of Collaboration Necessary as an Impetus for change / action Two videos that I wanted to play – but time is limited Playing Out: http://playingout.net/ The Tree: http://youtu.be/QERuKC34smw  Merging our footprints makes the greatest impact Collaboratively, we are a ‘Stronger Force’, as opposed to individually lightly treading on the issuesExamples of moving concepts forward and the value of parallel action – action does not happen at the end of ‘governance, policy dev’t’  
  • THIS IS A CRITICAL PATHACTION IS NECESSARY – NO DOCUMENT ON A SHELF
  • ACTION Here are just a few of true engagement and collaborative leadership / impactFootprints in TimeActive TransportationHealthy Children Healthy Spaces BUT – a continuum is critical “This is only a part of our story”
  • How do we get there . . . Create a model that integrates our principles, values the processHOW DO WE SUSTAIN AND CREATE A MODEL THAT LIVES BEYOND WHO IS AT THE TABLE AND ‘CURRENT FUNDING’The Healthy Community model will link your health and opportunities for a higher quality of life with accessible programsHealth is built into multi sector policies and planningChange has to happen from the grassroots down and system up (supported by a system of collaboration) – see model on slide 37INTEGRATION – building a different model for health that is not the Health Care System with a focus on hospital / Dr. spending, but on community health, prevention, holistic perspective
  • Two videos that I wanted to play – but time is limited Playing Out: http://playingout.net/ The Tree: http://youtu.be/QERuKC34smwCEHE – Knowledge Leaders in Children’s Environmental Health Equity- redefine Environmental health – both interactive and passive engagement of a child with their environment
  • Respect Community Needs: The value of understanding what speaks to individual or organizational goals and still remains consistent with our common goal FINDING SHARED LANGUAGE / LISTEN
  • To ensure that our partnerships shift and change – are not just rusty vehicles for funding proposalsEffective Partnerships that focus on:co-ordinated assetscommon groundsopen communicationshared ownershipcollaborative leadership collective impact Being unique, large, (low tax base), isolated – had to be innovative and resilient.
  • To ensure that our partnerships shift and change – are not just rusty vehicles for funding proposalsEffective Partnerships that focus on:co-ordinated assetscommon groundsopen communicationshared ownershipcollaborative leadership collective impact Being unique, large, (low tax base), isolated – had to be innovative and resilient.
  • Collective goals that build on: local strengthsaccessible spaces existing initiativescombined expertise
  • "If you are passionate about something, you are probably going to be a leader"The idea and how action and a mindset makes it happen – shifting from talk to walk the talk and value action – regardless of where it comes from.Supported by:Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport – no staffingOntario Trillium Foundation – partial staffing
  • In order to be effective, we shift emphasis (not focus) to speak to the goals of partners, circumstances and projects Integrate health / healthy community into all sectors / interests. Those goals, objectives, principles can shift without losing our vision- from a youth perspective- from a health equity perspective- from a cultural perspective Awareness of language and need to adapt / shift (but not change)
  • history of why 100% of our work is inpartnership “The Futility of Isolated Initiatives” KidActive – CCPN – Healthy Schools 2020CPANPhysical Activity Network – PAN-RCRole working with other collaboratives – CCPN, Child & Nature AllianceHealthy Community Partnership - Research, Policy, Community Development Need for collaborationBlow bubbles . . . . . Chaotic scramble vs. focused effort – big bang !Each represents a ‘silo’ footprint’Merging our footprints makes the greatest impactCollaboratively, we are a ‘Stronger Force’, as opposed to individually lightly treading on the issuesWe acknowledge the value that seniors bring to our communities – “as leaders, volunteers, sources of cultural, historical and practical knowledge, role models”WE KNOW THAT WE NEED A COMMON GOAL – A VISION Collective efforts by communities which are directed towards increasing community control over the determinants of health, and thereby improving health.
  • Socio ecological Model – foundation for what we doReflects the principles of the Ottawa Charter – with a focus on multi sector integration (health in all sectors), strength of collaboration and an understanding that every child’s health development is determined by the environments and relationships around them.Each intersection or ‘membrane’= positive and interactive relationshipSocio ecological Model – foundation for what we do Reflects the principles of the Ottawa Charter – with a focus on multi sector integration (health in all sectors), strength of collaboration and an understanding that every child’s health development is determined by the environments and relationships around them. Each intersection or ‘membrane’= positive and interactive relationship Goals: common –children’ health & well being, healthy community and connection to a healthy natural environment (socioecological health), common goal is to improve our communities’ health, well being and increase quality of life for everyone – SDOH / Socioecological model  Foundation of not just what I intrinsically believe, but also what the evidence and expertise tells us - Collective impact is far greater in collaboration – of multi sector ‘leaders’, ‘champions’, therefore - our work is entirely collaborative. Funded Collaboratives:PAN-RC – current chairHealthy Community Partnership – current co-ordinator Unfunded Collaboratives: many but still have traction / action based on our partnerships 
  • Healthy Communities Partnership - Renfrew County - Sustainable Food System

    1. 1. November 28, 2013 DU B FIT Consulting Nancy Dubois dubfit@rogers.com 519.446.3636
    2. 2. Opening Remarks • Purpose – To explore a potential Food System approach in Renfrew County with a particular emphasis on population-based approaches. – To determine next steps including the level of interest • Facilitator 3
    3. 3. Introductions – 5 P’s • • • • • Purpose Process Paper Place People 4
    4. 4. Introductions – 5 P’s • Purpose • Process – Overview of Agenda – Bicycle Rack • Paper - Handouts • Place – washrooms, fire exits, food • People - introductions 5
    5. 5. 5 Year Plan – Headline in 2015
    6. 6. Food – The Big Picture • Food System • Food (Policy) Councils / Coalitions – Characteristics – Priorities / activities – Members • Food Charters • Possible Steps for Renfrew County 10
    7. 7. A healthy food system … • is one in which all residents have access to, and can afford to buy, safe, nutritious, and culturally-acceptable food that has been produced in an environmentally sustainable way and that sustains our rural communities. (Waterloo Region http://www.wrfoodsystem.ca/priorities ) 11
    8. 8. 12
    9. 9. Description – Food (Policy) Council • Bring together stakeholders from diverse food-related sectors to examine how the food system is operating and to develop ideas, actions and policy recommendations on how to improve it. • Take many forms, but are typically either commissioned by governments, or are predominately a grassroots effort – may be a reincarnation or evolution of an another group • Have been successful at educating officials and the public, shaping public policy, improving coordination between existing programs, and starting new programs 14
    10. 10. Common Operating Characteristics • • • • • • • • Take a comprehensive approach Pursue long-term strategies Offer tangible solutions Are place-based with a strong local component Advocate on behalf of the larger community Seek government buy-in Establish formal membership Operate with little or no funding • Food Policy Council Briefing Paper http://www.ncchpp.ca/148/publications.ccnpps?id_article= 664 15
    11. 11. 16
    12. 12. Common Process • Situational Assessment / Environmental Scan • Set priorities • Establish a plan of action for each priority (long and short term) • Recruit the players 17
    13. 13. 18
    14. 14. 19
    15. 15. 20
    16. 16. Typical Activities of a Food Council (1) • Mapping and publicizing local food resources • Creating new transit routes to connect underserved areas with full-service grocery stores • Persuading government agencies to purchase from local farmers • Organizing community gardens and farmers’ markets • Advocate for policy change to improve a community's food system • Develop programs that address gaps in a community's food system 21
    17. 17. Typical Activities of a Food Council (2) • Strategize solutions that have wide applicability to the food system • Research and analyze the existing conditions of a community's food system • Communicate information about a community's food system • Cultivate partnerships among a community's five food sectors • Convene meetings that draw diverse stakeholders of a community's food system 22
    18. 18. E.g., Increase residents' access to grocery stores: FPCs unpack the interrelated causes of the problem, considering things like: • Infrastructure: Are (public) transportation links to existing grocery stores adequate? • Economic development: Which banks will or will not loan to new grocery stores? • Built environment: Which zoning codes or regulations could be changed to locate grocery stores closer to residential areas? • Alternatives or supplemental programs: Could a farmers market or home delivery program fill service gaps? 23
    19. 19. Kamloops Food Action Initiative The Interior Health Authority, the City of Kamloops and the Kamloops Food Policy Council partnered to undertake the Community Food Action Initiative project in 2006. The goal was to engage stakeholders in efforts to strengthen and support food planning, policy, and practices in the Kamloops Region. Five project elements: 1. Inventory of resources and food action projects; 2. Community consultation and policy review; 3. Food Action Forum to review policy and develop actions; 4. Draft Plan; 5. Evaluation using the Food Security Report Card tool. 24
    20. 20. http://www.wrfoodsystem.ca/ 25
    21. 21. 26
    22. 22. 27
    23. 23. 28
    24. 24. 29
    25. 25. Food Charters They are policy-reference documents that: • present a vision for a just and sustainable food system that has been developed by the community and endorsed by the community’s decision-makers • anchor municipal commitments to sustainable food system policies • provide guidelines for decisions about food • bring people together to talk about & work on local food system and food security challenges • provide a reference for managing food system issues on a system-wide basis. 30
    26. 26. Benefits of a Food Charter • Activate civic engagement – Create opportunities for conversations about food – Create a valuable tool through collaborative process – More public participation helps communities address challenges • Articulate an overall vision for food policy – Bring together separate policy areas (land use/zoning, waste management, health & food safety – Support staff to initiate innovative planning & operations strategies • Facilitate collaboration – – – – Facilitate inclusivity Expand traditional thinking & roles Extend range of influence & action Show leadership & vision 31
    27. 27. Benefits of a Food Charter • Catalyze actions – Inform projects that benefit local economies and the environment – Support fundraising • Benefit the environment – encourage personal & institutional choices that support more sustainable food systems 32
    28. 28. Quotes from Communities with a Food Charter: • • • • —“Galvanizes and focuses work around food” —“Makes the city a leader” —“Helps put food on the municipal agenda” —“Municipal resources become available for food issues” • —“Development of new community gardens and farmers’ markets” • —“Facilitates and frames food system research and assessment” • —“Facilitates / guides the development of more applied/specific policy documents” 33
    29. 29. Common Charter Ingredients • • • • Vision statements Principles / Guidelines Action Goals / Priorities Background & rationale 34
    30. 30. Charter Principles • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PCLQThZ 8io&feature=youtu.be - Guelph Wellington Food Charter • Vancouver – Ecological health – Social justice – Community economic development – Collaboration & participation – Celebration 35
    31. 31. 36
    32. 32. Examples of Food Charters • • • • • • • • • • Toronto’s Food Charter (2000) Saskatoon Food Charter (2002) City of Greater Sudbury Food Charter (2004) Vancouver Food Charter (2007) Capital Region Food Charter (2008) Region of Durham (2008) Thunder Bay Food Charter (2008) London’s Food Charter (2010) Guelph-Wellington Food Charter (2011) Kawartha Lakes Food Charter (2011) 37
    33. 33. Supportive Resources • G-W Food Charter Toolkit http://www.gwfrt.com/wpcontent/uploads/2013/04/GWFRT_Toolkit_Final_20 13.pdf – – – – – Toolkit for Eaters - page 3 Toolkit for Growers - page 5 Toolkit for Business and Institutions - page 7 Toolkit for Policy Makers - page 8 Toolkit for Community Food Projects - page 9 • Ottawa’s Food for All Policy Writing Team Toolbox http://www.justfood.ca/foodforall/documents/Food _for_All_Policy_Writing_Team_Toolbox.pdf 38
    34. 34. Typical Process to Develop Charter • Ottawa – Conducted a scan of food programs and services – Conducted a series of literature reviews and in-depth stakeholder interviews to help us learn about the experiences of others who have worked towards addressing food issues and understand what steps are needed in order to translate these community ideas into action in Ottawa. – Food For All hosted Food Action Planning conversations to identify issues that exist around food in Ottawa and to build a vision of what food in Ottawa can and should look like. – Policy-writing teams comprised of community participants then worked together to set policy priorities based on evidence and research, and developed the food Action Plan Proposals. For many volunteers, this was the very first time they had had a chance to engage in a policy process. – We have hosted Kitchen Table Talks focussing on the different chapters of the Food Action Plan and – Sought online feedback on the website. 39
    35. 35. Typical Process to Develop Charter (2) • • • Create a Steering Committee / Core Group Determine your local resources and process Community Food Assessment – Mapping Food Access Points (existing Continuum for Norfolk & Haldimand) – Community Consultations – open forum, stakeholder interviews, focus groups – Report to summarize current situation & desired future • • Draft Food Charter Gain input to draft – Open input via Web site/ paper – Community Consultations – open forum, stakeholder interviews, focus groups • • Finalize the Charter Endorsement – Community organizations / Stakeholders – Local government • Communicate Charter to stimulate corresponding action 40
    36. 36. Introduction to Policy Development / Change • "The World Has Changed“ - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrlEQ15mVPM • Overview of physical activity examples from RC – Shawna • Examples of healthy eating policy approaches from other communities – Support for community gardens (water, storage, security) – Zoning to support year-round Farmers’ Markets – Pension options for farmers – Organizational procurement policies – Signs to denote local food availability – Edible landscapes 41
    37. 37. Common Process for Policy Development
    38. 38. Collective action / Partnership is KEY • Readiness on four fronts – Step 2 – Each organization in partnership – The community who will be affected by the policy change – The decision-makers – The partnership overall 44
    39. 39. • Scanning the Local Food Environment With a marker, circulate to the stations to add what you know about that is currently happening in RC regarding food system elements • Look at what is already on the sheet - add new items • 2 columns - what is happening and where 45
    40. 40. Identifying Local Food Issues – a World Cafe 1. How do you interpret the term "local"? 2. What changes would you suggest to this Food System framework? (picture posted) 3. What concerns do you have about the local food system (same picture)? 4. What are the barriers in Renfrew County to people accessing healthy, local foods on a regular basis? 5. What most influences your food purchases, including convenience foods? 6. Where do you see significant food waste occurring in the county? 7. What food skills are in need of improvement in the community? 8. How do you feel about how land is being used now and planned for in the future in Renfrew County? 46
    41. 41. Results of the Landscape & the Cafe Discussions • So What? • Emerging Priorities? • Index Cards on tables – Don’t limit your ideas based on resources – Include short term, quick wins & longer term more strategic priorities 47
    42. 42. Vision & Mission for a Food Council • Vision Statement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioYYSOKBtY • Mission https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtyCt83J LNY 48
    43. 43. Examples of Vision & Mission for Food Councils • Waterloo’s healthy food system is one in which all residents have access to, and can afford to buy, safe, nutritious, and culturally-acceptable food that has been produced in an environmentally sustainable way and that sustains our rural communities. The Chatham-Kent Food Policy Council envisions a community where: • all residents have access to adequate, affordable , safe, nutritious, and culturally-acceptable food; • there is a sustainable food system* (e.g. local foods are available and promoted, local agricultural lands and farmers are protected and supported, urban agriculture is encouraged, and food has been produced and distributed in an environmentally acceptable way); • food is an important part of our heritage and culture. Edmonton has a resilient food and agriculture system that contributes to the local economy and the overall cultural, financial, social and environmental sustainability of the city. 49
    44. 44. 50
    45. 45. Creating a Vision • Using sticky notes at your tables, write single words/phrases that describe “the preferred future” ; a “realistic stretch” • Build commonalities as a group • Don’t worry about wordsmithing 51
    46. 46. Mission Statement • • • • The purpose, mandate, reason for being Unique from any other group Necessary to work towards the Vision Write a mission Statement at each table 52
    47. 47. Sample Mission Statements • Edmonton Food Council responsibilities include the following core functions and activities: • Advisory – proposing priorities and work plans to Administration – providing advice on food and urban agriculture issues • Research and Evaluation – identifying emerging issues and potential solutions – monitoring and reporting on progress of the Strategy • Coordinating – playing a networking and connecting role between the many partners involved with implementing the Strategy – facilitating collaboration between Administration and community partners • Engagement and Education 53
    48. 48. Sample Mission Statements The mission of the Chatham-Kent Food Policy Council is to encourage and facilitate dialogue and collaboration among food related organizations, agencies, services, food producers and distributors, consumers, business and government to develop strategies for the promotion and facilitation of the vision and bring it to action. The mandate of the VFPC is to support the development of a food system where food is: – Safe, nutritious, and culturally appropriate – Affordable, available, and accessible to all – Produced, processed, marketed, consumed, and waste products reused or managed in a manner that is: • Financially viable • Protects the health and dignity of people • Minimally impacting the environment. 54
    49. 49. Interest in Further Participation 55
    50. 50. Closing Remarks • • • • Survey Monkey coming Reflections on today? What to expect next Thank you’s 56
    51. 51. Isolated, Disjointed Initiatives
    52. 52. Connected Network
    53. 53. Community Engagement  Engage 2 streams – multi sector community leaders / members  What can we do to support local priorities and needs?  Build on what exists locally  Enhance and support our assets  Engage people of all ages and backgrounds  Make a local impact
    54. 54. Knowledge Sharing  Community Engagement  Evidence Based Best Practices & Expertise  Oct., 2008  June, 2009  2010  Feb., 2011  June, 2012
    55. 55. Community Action  Active Transportation (AT-Culture Shift, STP, 14 bikes, Silver Chain Challenge)  Access To Physical Activity  Built Environment  Natural Environment (eg: Guide to Outside, Natural Spaces Tool Kit)
    56. 56. Community Action  Active Transportation (STP, 14 bikes, Silver Chain Challenge)  Healthy Active Community Charter  Community Gardens in Every School  Community Use of Schools – Walking in the Halls  FIT – First Nations Culture & Natural Spaces
    57. 57. Active Transportation  Engagement – 49 members of working group  Contribution to the Renfrew County Active Transportation Strategy  Connect benefits to other sectors  Inclusion of Active Transportation in 2013-2018 County Strategy  Inclusion of Active Transportation into Official Plan  What does this mean to local municipalities?
    58. 58. Active Transportation  Engagement – 49 members of working group  Collaborative development of the Active Transportation Strategy  OTF grant to support AT-Culture Shift  Inclusion of Active Transportation in 2013-2018 County Strategy  Inclusion of Active Transportation into Official Plan
    59. 59. Other Priority Areas  Built Environment  Natural Environment  Active Outdoor Play (part of Access)  Trails – Walking / Cycling (part of AT)  After School Programs (part of Access)
    60. 60. EffectivePartnerships co-ordinated assets commongrounds opencommunication sharedownership collaborative leadership collectiveimpact
    61. 61. Model / Governance sharedvision collaborative leadership effectivecommunication  connectednetwork supportive environments & healthy policy dev’t Sharedinvestment collectiveimpact
    62. 62. Building From Within localstrengths accessible spaces existinginitiatives combinedexpertise
    63. 63. Thank you! Shawna Babcock Executive Director, KidActive Co-ordinator, Healthy Communities Partnership - RC Chair, Physical Activity Network-RC sbabcock@kidactive.ca 613 633 7075 (mobile) http://www.kidactive.ca http://www.physicalactivitynetwork.ca
    64. 64. The futility of isolated initiatives Society / Political System Health Care System Community Education (Early Childhood / School Aged) Recreation Home Transportation

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