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BUILDING DIALOGIC COLLECTIONS
AND SCHOLARSHIP
Sharon M. Leon (@sleonchnm), RRCHNM-GMU
COLLABORATIVE
COLLECTION
BUILDING
We pretty much know how this goes, and if you don’t Sheila Brennan and Mills Kelly have ...
Washington University in St. Louis
UMBC — Denise Meringolo and eventually in partnership with Maryland Historical Society
Cleveland
“For us [the dialogue-driven museum] has meant engaging with our
audiences in mutually exploring the memory and meaning of...
WHY NOT
DIALOGIC
DIGITAL
HISTORY
SCHOLARSHIP?
“First, the number of scholars willing to commit themselves and their
careers to digital scholarship has not kept pace wit...
Te Papa 

Museum of New Zealand
USER PERSONAS
From the most common ground
on content to the least:
➤ Historian in the subfield
➤ Historian in the general ...
“A participatory culture is a culture with relatively low barriers to
artistic expression and civic engagement, strong sup...
CommentPress 

Kathleen Fitzpatrick — Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Pre...
hypothes.is — public or private annotations on the web (using annotator.js)
Scholarly Remix (NYPL) — in isolation, or…. Hub and spoke model — a concentrated universe of materials, that a group of sc...
A larger linked open data network of scholarship that allows us to freely build in conversation with one another, drawing ...
WHY NOT?
➤ Focuses us on process rather
than end products
➤ The process requires
management (assignments
matter)
➤ Incenti...
BUILDING DIALOGIC COLLECTIONS
AND SCHOLARSHIP
Sharon M. Leon (@sleonchnm), RRCHNM-GMU
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship
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Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship

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A talk for AHA 2016 about bringing the public history methods of dialogue and collaboration to digital history scholarship in the academic research realm

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Building Dialogical Collections and Scholarship

  1. 1. BUILDING DIALOGIC COLLECTIONS AND SCHOLARSHIP Sharon M. Leon (@sleonchnm), RRCHNM-GMU
  2. 2. COLLABORATIVE COLLECTION BUILDING We pretty much know how this goes, and if you don’t Sheila Brennan and Mills Kelly have a great article on their work on the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank called “Why Collecting History Online is Web 1.5” (http://chnm.gmu.edu/essays-on-history-new-media/essays/?essayid=47) Shared authority, reflective practice, co-creation
  3. 3. Washington University in St. Louis
  4. 4. UMBC — Denise Meringolo and eventually in partnership with Maryland Historical Society
  5. 5. Cleveland
  6. 6. “For us [the dialogue-driven museum] has meant engaging with our audiences in mutually exploring the memory and meaning of Chinatown’s past. It has meant learning how different people learn in different ways and helping to facilitate that process. And it has meant taking what we learn from these dialogues and further improving the planning and development of the organization. Ultimately, we week to become an ever more resonant and responsible history center in which scholarship and public programs can help make a critical historical awareness a powerful factor in improving New York and the community for the future. - Jack Tchen, “Creating a Dialogic Museum: The Chinatown History Museum Experiment,” in Museums and Communities: The Politics of Public Culture, 1992. CREATING A DIALOGIC MUSEUM
  7. 7. WHY NOT DIALOGIC DIGITAL HISTORY SCHOLARSHIP?
  8. 8. “First, the number of scholars willing to commit themselves and their careers to digital scholarship has not kept pace with institutional opportunities. Second, today few scholars are trying, as they did earlier in the web's history, to reimagine the form as well as the substance of scholarship. In some ways, scholarly innovation has been domesticated, with the very ubiquity of the web bringing a lowered sense of excitement, possibility, and urgency. These two deficiencies form a reinforcing cycle: the diminished sense of possibility weakens the incentive for scholars to take risks, and the unwillingness to take risks limits the impact and excitement generated by boldly innovative projects. - Ed Ayers, “Does Digital Scholarship Have a Future?” EDUCAUSE Review (2013) DOES DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP HAVE A FUTURE?
  9. 9. Te Papa Museum of New Zealand
  10. 10. USER PERSONAS From the most common ground on content to the least: ➤ Historian in the subfield ➤ Historian in the general field ➤ Historian in another field ➤ Undergraduate major ➤ Student in a general education requirement course ➤ [Subject-matter enthusiast] ➤ Accidental/browsing visitor Base content knowledge; Interests and questions; Access and equipment; digital literacy/competence; Time and incentives
  11. 11. “A participatory culture is a culture with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement, strong support for creating and sharing creations, and some type of informal mentorship whereby experienced participants pass along knowledge to novices. In a participatory culture, members also believe their contributions matter and feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least, members care about others’ opinions of what they have created). - Henry Jenkins, et al., Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture (2009) PARTICIPATORY CULTURE How do we build a participatory culture around digital historical scholarship? (Culture questions are about community) Because we have some of the tools and infrastructure right now.
  12. 12. CommentPress Kathleen Fitzpatrick — Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (NYU Press, 2011) Jack Dougherty and Kristin Nawrotzki’s edited collection, Writing History in the Digital Age (U.Michigan, 2013) Shawn Graham, Ian Milligan, and S. Weingart’s The Historians Macroscope (Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Microscope (Imperial College Press, 2015)
  13. 13. hypothes.is — public or private annotations on the web (using annotator.js)
  14. 14. Scholarly Remix (NYPL) — in isolation, or…. Hub and spoke model — a concentrated universe of materials, that a group of scholars each addresses bringing their own interpretive positions Our content management systems are making this more and more possible everyday.
  15. 15. A larger linked open data network of scholarship that allows us to freely build in conversation with one another, drawing on an ever expanding range of sources, but also an expanding universe of scholarship that is publish in an accessible way on the way (preferably as machine readable text with paragraph anchor numbers). This is harder — full scale shift, but it can happen.
  16. 16. WHY NOT? ➤ Focuses us on process rather than end products ➤ The process requires management (assignments matter) ➤ Incentives for engagement ➤ Resistance to agile processes ➤ Problems with pace (too immediate and too slow) ➤ Outreach and marketing ➤ Sustainability and preservation
  17. 17. BUILDING DIALOGIC COLLECTIONS AND SCHOLARSHIP Sharon M. Leon (@sleonchnm), RRCHNM-GMU

A talk for AHA 2016 about bringing the public history methods of dialogue and collaboration to digital history scholarship in the academic research realm

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