Common Core State Standards - Presented by Tim Doak

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This is the CCSS presented that Mr. Doak presented on the September 21, 2012 and the January 2, 2013 workshop day.

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  • We are in a different time, then this picture. How are our schools changing, or have they? Are we preparing our students for 1973?, 1995? Can you honestly say that your school’s curriculum is preparing your students for 2015 or 2020? What needs to be adjusted in order to prepare our students for the global society.
  • This is an exciting time, Common Core State Standards is a remarkable time in our history, They are here and now what, that’s what this gift is all about today, becoming informed. The more each of us know, the better we can start to make wise decisions about implementation. The second gift is that of time, the standards do not have to be in place by the end of this year, you have time to create a thoughtful plan of implementation. The third gift is tools.
  • Focus on Four Strands(reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language)The benefits of an integrated literacy approach(both in terms of reaching out to content areas beyond ELA and also in terms of research and media skills being integrated into the four strands)A focus on results rather than means(“the Standards leave room for teachers, curriculum developers, and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be addressed” (p. 4).)
  • Your last handout shows some examples of a current California Content Standard aligned with a Common Core State Standard. Look over yours with a partner and determine what the standard for both is asking the student to do. It will be easier if you circle the verbs in each one. What did you notice?Where is the rigor?
  • One reason for this shift in the organization of writing standards is to better prepare students for college and career writing. This shift matches the NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) framework.Notice the decreasing emphasis on writing to convey an experience (narrative), and the increase in writing to persuade or explain.
  • Common Core State Standards - Presented by Tim Doak

    1. 1. Common Core StandardsA Challenge and an Opportunity
    2. 2. Workforce Needs: EmployeeDeficienciesOf the high school students that you recently hired, what were theirdeficiencies? Written Communication 81% Leadership 73% Work Ethic 70% Critical Thinking & Problem Solving 70% Self-Direction 58% Source: Are They Really Ready to Work? (2006) The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, P21, and SHRM
    3. 3. Why Now?• Global competition• Today’s jobs require different skills• Thinking and Reasoning will become basic skills
    4. 4. Why is This Important for Students, Teachers, and Parents?• Prepares students with the knowledge and skills they need to similar standards across states• Student mobility• Succeed in college and work• Ensures consistent expectations regardless of a student’s zip code• Provides educators, parents, and students with clear, focused guideposts
    5. 5. Kindergarten Students• 2012 • 2028 – Starting School – College Graduation• 2018 • 2071 – Middle School – turning 65• 2020 • 2096 – 8th grade promotion – turning 90• 2024 – High School • Some maybe living in Graduation the 22nd Century
    6. 6. VIDEO
    7. 7. Workforce Needs: What skills andcontent areas will be growing inimportance in the next five years?Critical Thinking 78%I.T. 77%Health and Wellness 76%Collaboration 74%Creativity and Innovation 74%Personal Financial Responsibility 72%Source: Are They Really Ready to Work?(2006) The Conference Board, Corporate Voices
    8. 8. Standards Definition – Level of quality accepted as norm Types of Standards• State Standard• Common Core• College Readiness (ACT)• National Organizations• International
    9. 9. There is a greater focus on:• Non-fiction text• Self directed learning• 4 C’s • Critical Thinking • Communication • Collaboration • Creativity
    10. 10. Advantages to Common Core Standards• A focus on college and career readiness• Inclusion of the four strands of English Language Arts: • Reading • Writing • Listening and speaking • Language• The benefits of an integrated literacy approach – all educators have a shared responsibility for literacy instruction, regardless of discipline or content area.• A focus on results rather than means – . . .―the Standards leave room for teachers, curriculum developers, and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be addressed.‖ (p. 4)• Efficiencies of scale – common standards allow for greater collaboration among states in the areas of: • Professional development • Resource development • Teaching tools 15
    11. 11. Rothman’s Key Points• Common Core have paired down the list of topic to allow teachers to focus on subject.(Depth, not breath)• Common Core Lessons and testing get more complex as students progress. (Ramping up difficultly)• Common Core focuses on both aspects of literacy. (Speaking and Listening)• Robert Rothman Michigan State University
    12. 12. VIDEO
    13. 13. 16 Habits of Mind• Persisting • Thinking & Communicating• Managing Impulsivity with clarity and precision• Listening with understanding • Gathering Data through all & empathy senses• Thinking flexibility • Creating, imagining,• Thinking about thinking innovating• Striving for accuracy • Responding with wonderment & awe• Questioning & posing problems • Taking responsible risks• Applying past knowledge to • Finding humor new situations • Thinking Interdependently • Remaining open to continuous learning
    14. 14. Rigor
    15. 15. What is Depth of Knowledge (DOK)?• A scale of cognitive demand (thinking) to align standards with assessments• Based on the research of Norman Webb, University of Wisconsin Center for Education Research and the National Institute for Science Education• Defines the ―ceiling‖ or highest DOK level for each Core Content standard for the state assessment• Guides item development for state assessments
    16. 16. Webb’s Four Levels ofCognitive Complexity• Level 1: Recall and Reproduction• Level 2: Skills & Concepts• Level 3: Strategic Thinking• Level 4: Extended Thinking
    17. 17. Same Verb—Three Different DOK Levels DOK 1- Describe three characteristics of metamorphic rocks. (Requires simple recall) DOK 2- Describe the difference between metamorphic and igneous rocks. (Requires cognitive processing to determine the differences in the two rock types) DOK 3- Describe a model that you might use to represent the relationships that exist within the rock cycle. (Requires deep understanding of rock cycle and a determination of how best to represent it)
    18. 18. ―Extending the length of an activityalone does not necessarily createrigor!‖
    19. 19. The Standards cultivate three mutually reinforcing writingcapacities: – To persuade – To explain – To convey real or imagined experience Distribution of Communicative Purposes by Grade in the 2011 NAEP Writing Framework To Convey Grade To Persuade To Explain Experience 4 30% 35% 35% 8 35% 35% 30% 12 40% 40% 20% 25
    20. 20. Emphasis on Informational Text Distribution of Literary and Informational Passages by Grade in the 2009 NAEP Reading FrameworkGrade Literary Information 4 50% 50% 8 45% 55% 12 30% 70% 41
    21. 21. Overview of Text Text Complexity Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, Reader and Task and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment. 42
    22. 22. Step 1: Quantitative Measures Quantitative Measures Measures such as: • Word length • Word frequency • Word difficulty • Sentence length • Text length • Text cohesion 43
    23. 23. Step 2: Qualitative Measures Measures such as: • Structure • Language Demands and Conventions • Knowledge Demands • Levels of Meaning/Purpose 44
    24. 24. Step 3: Reader and Task Considerations such as: • Motivation • Knowledge and experience • Purpose for reading • Complexity of task assigned regarding text • Complexity of questions asked regarding text 45
    25. 25. What’s the same? What’s different?CCSS – M (Grade 4) State Standard (Grade 4)• Draw and identify lines and angles, • Uses properties or attributes of angles and classify shapes by properties of (number of angles) or sides (number of their lines and angles sides, length of sides, parallelism, or perpendicularity) to identify, describe, or• 1. Draw points, lines, line segments, distinguish among triangles, squares, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and rectangles, rhombi, trapezoids, perpendicular and parallel lines. hexagons, or octagons; or classify angles Identify these in two dimensional relative to 90 degrees as more than, less figures than, or equal to.• 1. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles• 2. Recognize a line of symmetry for a two- dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts, Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry
    26. 26. What’s the same? What’s different? CCSS – M (Grade 4) State Standard (Grade 4)• Draw and identify lines and angles, and • Uses properties or attributes of angles classify shapes by properties of their lines (number of angles) or sides (number and angles of sides, length of sides, parallelism, or perpendicularity) to identify, describe,• 1. Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, or distinguish among triangles, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and squares, rectangles, rhombi, perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify trapezoids, hexagons, or octagons; or these in two dimensional figures classify angles relative to 90 degrees as more than, less than, or equal to.• 1. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles• 2. Recognize a line of symmetry for a two- dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts, Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry
    27. 27. 5 Things Every Teacher Should be Doing to Meet the Common Core State Standards Number 1 Lead High Level, Text-Based DiscussionsWhen you ask students to discuss a text asa whole class or in small groups, make surethat your questions are grounded in the text,and that students refer to the text in theirresponses.
    28. 28. 5 Things Every Teacher Should be Doing to Meet the Common Core State Standards Number 2 Focus on Process, not just ContentThe Common Core State Standards stress theimportance of student discovery. In otherwords, we cannot merely fill students’ headswith content; we should provide them withopportunities to discover information on their
    29. 29. 5 Things Every Teacher Should be Doing to Meet the Common Core State Standards Number 3Create Assignments for Real Audiences and with Real PurposesThere is an importance of writing for avariety of audiences. Students should ―writeroutinely over extended time frames...for arange of tasks, purposes, and audiences‖.
    30. 30. 5 Things Every Teacher Should be Doing to Meet the Common Core State Standards Number 4 Teach Argument, Not PersuasionThe CCSS favor argument over persuasionbecause it requires more logic and reason,and is more in line with the kind of writingthat students will be expected to do incollege.
    31. 31. 5 Things Every Teacher Should be Doing to Meet the Common Core State Standards Number 5 Increase Text ComplexityLook for balance: material should be difficultenough that students are learning somethingnew, but not so hard that they give up.
    32. 32. Most Importantly• Ensure that the movement towards Common Core is only a part of a larger M.S.A.D. No. 27 district reform effort.• School reform needs to center on the relationships among students, teachers, parents, educational leaders, and the community• The quality of those interactions will be what leads to high student learning more than any set of standards
    33. 33. BurningQuestions

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