Literate Environment Analysis Presentation The Beginning Reader, Pre K-3 (EDUC - 6706G - 4)

321 views

Published on

The Beginning Reader, Pre K-3 (EDUC - 6706G - 4)
Professor Moore

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
321
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Literate Environment Analysis Presentation The Beginning Reader, Pre K-3 (EDUC - 6706G - 4)

  1. 1. LITERATE ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS PRESENTATION Developing a literate environment is essential for every classroom and every student. By Shannon Leu The Beginning Reader, Pre K-3 (EDUC - 6706G - 4) Walden University Professor Moore
  2. 2. I. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS, P-3 Learning and understanding your students is essential to creating a positive and effective literate classroom environment.  To better help learn student’s literacy levels, reading inventories can be taken.  “Reading inventories, in one form or another have existed for as long as teachers have been interested in better understanding their students’ reading development (Afflerbach, 2012, p.27).  “Teachers use diagnostic reading assessments to identify students’ strengths and weaknesses (Tompkins, 2010, p. 86) 
  3. 3. COGNITIVE MEASURES RUNNING RECORDS Giving the students the running record allowed me to ask questions about each student’s reading.  A couple questions that I was able to ask about my students reading were “Does the reader self-correct the miscue?” and “Does the miscue change the meaning of the sentence (Tompkins, 2010, p. 86)?”  Learning where students are struggling can help to determine where they need to go and how we can get there.  These results will identify how well students are fluently reading grade level material. 
  4. 4. NON-COGNITIVE MEASURES STUDENT INVENTORIES Learn about each and every student in the classroom.  Learns student’s likes and dislikes.  Forms a bond between teacher and student that can never be broken.  Using this information will help gear lessons to students’ interests and help individual students find books that would interest them. 
  5. 5. RESEARCH Afflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment, K-12 (2nd ed). Newark, DE: International Reading Association Tompkins, G.E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century a balanced approach. New York: PearsonCuston Publishing.
  6. 6. II. SELECTING TEXTS     Having experience with text can help to build background knowledge, content knowledge, and help to minimize the difficulty that comes along with the increase of difficulty in texts (Laureate, Education 2010b). Texts need to be carefully selected to relate to the students in the classroom. The texts that were chosen were based on my students interest inventory of having a love for animals. To analyze text to be helpful for students you can use a literacy matrix to decide if the text falls in the narrative to informational region and the linguistic to semiotic region (Laureate, Education 2010a). A multiple variety of each region need to be implemented in the classroom.
  7. 7. II. SELECTING TEXTS  “Why Frog and Snake Never Play Together” by Ashley Bryan Matrix Narrative Semiotic  “A Kettle of Hawks and Other Wildlife Animal Groups” by Jim Arnosky Matrix Information Semiotic
  8. 8. II. SELECTING TEXTS  National Geographics for Kids Matrix Informational Linguistic Using this literacy matrix will help to create an even balance of genres in the classroom. When a teacher can balance the multiple genres in her classroom it allows for meaningful text to be taught to all students.
  9. 9. RESEARCH  Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010a) Analyzing and selecting text. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.j sp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2F blackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3D Course%26id%3D_4066 335_1%26url%3D  Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010b) Informational text in the early years. Retrieved fromhttps://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/fram eset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapp s%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype %3DCourse%26id%3D _4066335_1%26url%3D
  10. 10. III. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE State/District Standards C.S.5 Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. V.A.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibility from range of strategies. F.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. R.R.L.T.C.10 By the end of year, read and comprehend informational text. Learning Objective I can fluently and accurately read grade level texts. I can comprehend informational and fictional texts. Pre-assessment The students took the STAR test to determine their reading comprehension and DIBELS NEXT to test each student’s reading fluency.
  11. 11. III. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE  Interactive Perspective The Interactive Perspective deals with reading and writing accurately, fluently, and with comprehension (Walden, 2010). The interactive perspective was addressed in part of this lesson. The part of the lesson that it was addressed in was during the reading center of reading through the story and also in the fluency center with reader’s theater. When the perspectives of literacy are used in the classroom students can grow into lifelong learners that will always think critically and respond to the text they read (Laureate Education, 2010).
  12. 12. III. LITERACY LESSON: INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE The students will be reading through “Why Frog and Snake Never Play Together” by Ashley Bryan and “A Kettle of Hawks and Other Wildlife Groups” by Jim Arnosky.  Reading in whole group and small group focuses on comprehension and fluency with our Fab Four Bookmarks. 1. Predict, 2. Clarify 3. Question, 4.Summarize  Centers will be completed on two days out of the lesson. The centers will focus on comprehension and fluency. The fluency center will have the students completing reader’s theaters and the comprehension will focus on reading and summarizing with the story. 
  13. 13. RESEARCH  Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010) Perspectives on literacy learning.Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.j sp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2F blackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3D Course%26id%3D_4066335_1%26url%3D
  14. 14. IV. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE  Critical Perspective The Critical Perspective is judging, evaluating, and thinking critically about text (Walden, 2010).  Response Perspective The Response Perspective is reading, reacting, and responding to text in a variety of meaningful ways (Walden, 2010).
  15. 15. IV. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE State/District Standards R.R.L.T.C.10 By the end of year, read and comprehend informational text.C.S.5 Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. Learning Objective I will respond to a text in a way that I can show the text has related to my thoughts and feelings. Pre-assessment The students will be filling out a student inventory sheet that will help to learn about each student in the classroom on an individual level. This will allow the students to review what interests them but will also help guide the lessons that I teach.
  16. 16. IV. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE  For students to become better readers they need to understand what they are reading, sharing with others, and growing from their responses and other student’s responses (Laureate Education, 2010). It is essential to allow children the opportunity to experience and respond to text (Laureate Education, 2010).
  17. 17. IV. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE Critical Perspective  The Critical Perspective was addressed in this lesson by the judging and evaluating of the students with the ending of the story. The Critical Perspective is also addressed when the students are talking about the story’s original ending. They are judging and evaluating the ending to see if they agree with how the author ended the story. Response Perspective  The Response Perspective was addressed with the students participating in rewriting and illustrating a new ending for the text “Why Frog and Snake Never Play Together.” This will give the students the opportunity to end the story in a way that they create by putting their own ideas and illustrations on paper. Each student in the classroom will be able to learn about other students’ feelings and emotions.
  18. 18. IV. LITERACY LESSON: CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE  The teacher will start by introducing the objective to the students by giving them an example of what they are doing by modeling the example with a “think aloud.” “Think alouds” can help readers to become better readers by understanding what they are reading, sharing with others, and growing from their responses and other student’s responses (Laureate Education, 2010). The students will then use the Response Perspective to create a new ending for the story that they have read. The will have to evaluate and judge the original ending to see if they have different feelings of how it should end individually, in partners, or in a small group. After they respond to the ending of the story and create their new endings, they will share their new endings with the class. Each student in the classroom will be able to learn about other feelings and emotions that other students may have had from the story when the partners, groups, or individuals share their new endings.
  19. 19. RESEARCH  Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010) Perspectives on literacy learning.Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.j sp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2F blackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3D Course%26id%3D_4066335_1%26url%3D

×