CROWN MANAGEMENT JAKARTA CAPITAL: Guilty verdict in electronic waste recycling case

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On September 15, 2011, a Grand Jury in the District of Colorado returned an indictment against Executive Recycling, Inc., an e-waste recycling company headquartered in Englewood, Colorado, and two of its executives citing a variety of charges including multiple counts of wire and mail fraud, failure to file a Notice of Intent to Export with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in violation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), smuggling of goods from the United States, and destruction of records. (United States of America v. Executive Recycling, Inc., et al., Case 1:11-cr-00376- WJM, United States District Court for the District of Colorado.) Executive Recycling, Inc. collects e-waste from private households, businesses, and government entities.

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CROWN MANAGEMENT JAKARTA CAPITAL: Guilty verdict in electronic waste recycling case

  1. 1. CROWN MANAGEMENTJAKARTA CAPITAL: Guilty verdict in electronic waste recycling casehttp://www.instructables.com/answers/What-is-ewaste-What-can-it-do-Is-it-hazardous-/
  2. 2. In the first case of its kind, a jury in Colorado has found anelectronic waste (e-waste) recycling company and two of itsexecutives guilty of illegally exporting e-waste overseas, inaddition to other criminal charges. The implications of thiscase are broad and the convictions could serve as acatalyst for federal regulation of e-waste.  
  3. 3. On September 15, 2011, a Grand Jury in the District ofColorado returned an indictment against ExecutiveRecycling, Inc., an e-waste recycling companyheadquartered in Englewood, Colorado, and two of itsexecutives citing a variety of charges including multiplecounts of wire and mail fraud, failure to file a Notice ofIntent to Export with the U.S.
  4. 4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in violation of theResource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA),smuggling of goods from the United States, and destructionof records. (United States of America v. ExecutiveRecycling, Inc., et al., Case 1:11-cr-00376- WJM, UnitedStates District Court for the District of Colorado.) ExecutiveRecycling, Inc. collects e-waste from private households,businesses, and government entities.  
  5. 5. The indictment alleged that the company represented on itswebsite that it had “extensive knowledge of current EPArequirements” and that it would safely dispose collected e-waste within the United States. Instead, the companyexported over 300 shipments of e-waste overseas,including more than 100,000 cathode ray tubes (CRTs),which are known to contain lead.  
  6. 6. On December 21, 2012, after an 11-day trial, the juryrendered a guilty verdict on one count of illegal hazardouswaste export, one count of failure to file a Notification ofIntent to Export with EPA, and seven counts of wire fraud.
  7. 7. . The export and wire fraud counts each carry a maximumfine of US$500,000 or twice the gross gain or loss from theoffense; the failure to file count carries a maximum fine ofUS$50,000 per day of violation or twice the gross gain orloss from the offense. The jury also convicted two of thecompany’s executives on counts of wire fraud, mail fraud,illegal hazardous waste export, and the destruction,alteration, or falsification of records in a federalinvestigation. Sentencing is scheduled for April
  8. 8. Executive Recycling, Inc. was featured in a 2008 exposé onCBS’s “60 Minutes” news program on e-waste indeveloping countries. The “60 Minutes” episode focused onthe environmental and health problems believed to beassociated with the improper disposal of e-waste in China,Nigeria, and other countries lacking rigorous environmentalregulations and enforcement.
  9. 9. E-waste contains hazardous substances such as lead,chromium, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),dioxins, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The“60 Minutes” episode showed workers dismantlingdiscarded consumer electronics to reclaim valuablematerials, such as lead, gold, and copper, from componentparts. Unwanted components were E-waste containshazardous substances such as lead, chromium, mercury,polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, andpolybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The “60 Minutes”episode showed workers dismantling discarded consumerelectronics to reclaim valuable materials, such as lead,gold, and copper, from component parts. Unwantedcomponents were
  10. 10. E-waste contains hazardous substances such as lead,chromium, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs),dioxins, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The“60 Minutes” episode showed workers dismantlingdiscarded consumer electronics to reclaim valuablematerials, such as lead, gold, and copper, from componentparts. Unwanted components were E-waste containshazardous substances such as lead, chromium, mercury,polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, andpolybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The “60 Minutes”episode showed workers dismantling discarded consumerelectronics to reclaim valuable materials, such as lead,gold, and copper, from component parts. Unwantedcomponents were

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