Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Veiled viral marketing

1,835 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Veiled viral marketing

  1. 1. Veiled Viral Marketing:Disseminating Information on Stigmatized Illnessesvia Social Networking SitesDerek L. HansenBrigham Young Universitydlhansen@byu.edu or @shakmattChristianne JohnsonOgilvy Public Relations Worldwidechristianne.johnson@ogilvy.com
  2. 2. Viral Marketing
  3. 3. Health Education
  4. 4. What about Stigmatized Illnesses?
  5. 5. The Role of Online Anonymity Anonymous Notification Services Semi-Anonymous ForumsAnonymity also opens the door for sexual predators, trolls, and deviant behavior
  6. 6. Veiled Viral Marketing Sender ? Veil of Anonymity … … … Trusted Connection Receiver … … … Message ? Plausible DeniabilitySocially Bounded Anonymity “One of your friends who wishes to remain anonymous…”
  7. 7. Educational Quiz
  8. 8. Unveiled or Veiled Invites?
  9. 9. Unveiled (Facebook) Invite
  10. 10. Veiled (Email) Invite
  11. 11. Field Trial Recruitment Methods• Facebook Ad for women age 13-25 in U.S.***• University of Maryland, Michigan, & Michigan State • Fliers & emails to large courses in iSchool, Public Health, Business School, and Journalism ** • Posters in student union and health center of UMD * • Add in UMD student newspaper *• Health Advocacy Groups *
  12. 12. Study Participants• 1,022 people downloaded application• 90% women• Median age = 20• 40% Single, 34% In a Relationship, 25% Married• 16% actively looking for Dating or A Relationship• From 44 states & some international (NY, DC, Maryland, Pennsylvania, & Michigan had most)
  13. 13. Uninstalled App 171 (17%)576 (56%) 28 (3%)101 (10%)
  14. 14. Veiled or Unveiled? 60 (12%) 33 (6%) 425 (82%)
  15. 15. Invitations Actually Sent
  16. 16. Invitations Accepted High Acceptance Rate (even via email) suggests potential of Veiled Viral Marketing
  17. 17. Summary• Veiled Viral Marketing = “trusted” source + veil of anonymity• Fact Check: HPV showed that some users have interest in sending veiled invitations and those who receive them have a relatively high acceptance rate
  18. 18. Potential Problems & Solutions• SPAM (due to indiscriminant friending) • Allow people to turn off veiled messages• Invitees can decipher veiled inviter • Careful checks • Require invitations to multiple people• Increased stress for feeling singled out • Require invitations to multiple people & tell invitee • Link to reputable sites that are targeted toward wide audience• Possibility of inappropriate messages from “friends” • Only allow pointers to authoritative content, not personal messages
  19. 19. Future Work• Cleaner implementation• Understand WHY there is a high acceptance rate via user studies, interviews, and focus groups• Try in other domains (e.g., mental health)• Implementation in directed social networks (e.g., Twitter)
  20. 20. Questions?Derek L. HansenBrigham Young Universitydlhansen@byu.eduTwitter: @shakmatt

×