•   The University of Oxford has no known foundation date. Teaching                              at Oxford existed in some...
In 1605 Oxford wasstill a walled city, butseveral colleges hadbeen built outside thecity walls. (North is atthe bottom on ...
•   The University passed a Statute in 1875 allowing its delegates to create examinations for women at    roughly undergra...
•    The Radcliffe Camera,    built 1737–1749 as    Oxfords science library,    now holds books from    the English, Histo...
•   In October and November, before the planned start of the year of    training, candidates are applying to colleges. A s...
•   In line with the other UK universities, almost all    students are age 17 or over, and the majority    commence underg...
•   Oxford - not only the university but    also the largest research center in    Oxford more than a hundred    libraries...
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс
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University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс

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University of oxford A.Шадрин 11в класс

  1. 1. • The University of Oxford has no known foundation date. Teaching at Oxford existed in some form in 1096, but it is unclear at what point a university came into being. • The expulsion of foreigners from the University of Paris in 1167 caused many English scholars to return from France and settle in Oxford. The historian Gerald of Wales lectured to such scholars in 1188, and the first known foreign scholar, Emo of Friesland, arrived in 1190. The head of the University was named a chancellor from at least 1201, and the masters were recognised as a universitas or corporation in 1231. The students associated together on the basis of geographical origins, into two "nations", representing the North (including the Scots) and the South (including the Irish and the Welsh). In later centuries, geographical origins continued to influence many students affiliations when membership of a college or hall became customary in Oxford. Members of many religious orders, including Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites, and Augustinians, settled in Oxford in the mid-13th century, gained influence, and maintained houses for students. At about the sameThe coat of arms of the time, private benefactors established colleges to serve as self-university contained scholarly communities. Among the earliest such founders were William of Durham, who in 1249 endowed University College, and John Balliol, father of a future King of Scots: Balliol College bears his name. Another founder, Walter de Merton, a chancellor of England and afterwards Bishop of Rochester, devised a series of regulations for college life; Merton College thereby became the model for such establishments at Oxford, as well as at the University of Cambridge. Thereafter, an increasing number of students forsook living in halls and religious houses in favour of living in colleges.
  2. 2. In 1605 Oxford wasstill a walled city, butseveral colleges hadbeen built outside thecity walls. (North is atthe bottom on thismap.)
  3. 3. • The University passed a Statute in 1875 allowing its delegates to create examinations for women at roughly undergraduate level. The first four womens colleges were established thanks to the activism of the Association for Promoting the Higher Education of Women (AEW). Lady Margaret Hall (1878) was followed by Somerville College in 1879; the first 21 students from Somerville and Lady Margaret Hall attended lectures in rooms above an Oxford bakers shop. The first two colleges for women were followed by St Hughs (1886), St Hildas (1893) and St Annes College (1952). Oxford was long considered a bastion of male privilege, and it was not until 7 October 1920 that women became eligible for admission as full members of the university and were given the right to take degrees. In 1927 the Universitys dons created a quota that limited the number of female students to a quarter that of men, a ruling which was not abolished until 1957. However, before the 1970s all Oxford colleges were for men or women only, so that the number of women was effectively limited by the capacity of the womens colleges to admit students. It was not until 1959 that the womens colleges were given full collegiate status.• In 1974 Brasenose, Jesus, Wadham, Hertford and St Catherines became the first previously all- male colleges to admit women. In 2008 the last single sex college, St Hildas, admitted its first men, meaning all colleges are now co-residential. By 1988, 40% of undergraduates at Oxford were female; the ratio is now about 48:52 in mens favour.• The detective novel Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers – herself one of the first women to gain an academic degree from Oxford – takes place in a (fictional) womens college at Oxford, and the issue of womens education is central to its plot.
  4. 4. • The Radcliffe Camera, built 1737–1749 as Oxfords science library, now holds books from the English, History, and Theology collections.
  5. 5. • In October and November, before the planned start of the year of training, candidates are applying to colleges. A special commission is considering assessment (only excellent, A-level), letters of recommendation, conducts interviews. In some cases, the prospective student may be asked to show their written work, conduct their own written tests. (School examinations in the UK and are not held to standardize the schools, and the central examination boards - examination boards, accredited by the state.) Because of university places available before most students finish school exams, students are generally accepted on the condition that their estimates for the new academic year will be not less than a specified score (conditional offer). It is also necessary to know English better than the English (Certified IELTS - 7.0, TOEFL - 230). Education is not free: the cost of living per year - about 8,000 pounds, fees depend on the chosen specialty - Art - 6300 pounds, science - 8400 pounds, medicine - 15400 pounds. For admission to graduate and post-graduate candidates submit applications to the appropriate department.• Do not apply the statements in the same year in both Oxford and Cambridge universities.
  6. 6. • In line with the other UK universities, almost all students are age 17 or over, and the majority commence undergraduate courses at 18 or 19. However there is no upper or lower limit on the age of those admitted. There is a college, Harris Manchester, that caters only for students aged 21 or over.• Historically, it was common for boys to become members of the university between the ages of 14 and 19.[54] Jeremy Bentham matriculated in 1761 at the age of 13, which was unusually young. Much younger people are still occasionally admitted to the university if they are of the required standard, for example Ruth Lawrence matriculated age 12 in 1983,[56] as did Sufiah Yusof aged 13 in 1997.
  7. 7. • Oxford - not only the university but also the largest research center in Oxford more than a hundred libraries (the most extensive university library in the UK) and museums, its publisher.• Students have the opportunity to a lot of their time to leisure - at their disposal more than 300 groups of interest. Traditionally, attention is paid to the sport at Oxford as a useful and prestigious mind rest.• From the walls of Oxford was a whole group of brilliant men of science, literature, art - are taught by Christopher Wren, John Tolkien, Lewis Carroll, attended Roger Bacon and Margaret Thatcher. 25 British Prime Ministers finished Oxford.

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