Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Final presentation

314 views

Published on

Final_Presentation_6300

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Final presentation

  1. 1. E-Learning, Engagement, and Academic Success for Students in Texas Community Colleges EDFR 6300.60 Foundations of Research in Education Sean Getchell
  2. 2. Introduction Problem: The problem is that community college students in Texas who take online courses and are not actively engaged will have lower academic achievement as measured by their ability to perform all of the assignments in the course.
  3. 3. Purpose & Need • The purpose for this review of the literature is to examine the educational problems that Texas community college students who take online courses encounter. • Due to the lack of controlled studies in community college e-learning programs, there is a need to better understand the importance of the relationship between engagement and academic success in e- learning courses for Texas community college students (Stewart, Harlow, & DeBacco, 2011).
  4. 4. Research Questions The research questions are as follows: 1. Is there a relationship between the amount of time spent in the user-friendly online learning environment and student achievement as measured by their ability to perform all assignments in the course (discussion forums, quizzes, examinations, etc.)? 2. Is there a working relationship between the frequency of interaction in the online learning environment and student academic achievement as measured by their application of knowledge in the user-friendly online environment (e.g. Blackboard)?
  5. 5. Basic Assumptions of the Research 1. The first basic assumption is that the level of student engagement is directly tied to a student’s level of e-learning academic success. Therefore, the greater the amount of engagement and participation in their courses, the greater the amount of success they will encounter. Success will be measured by their ability to learn and apply that knowledge in the online environment. 2. A second basic assumption is that students need to have a working relationship between their instructor and their fellow students in order to be successful in their e-learning studies. This assumption will be measured by the amount of contact the student has with other students and the instructor (e-mail, forum response, group projects, interaction during the online lecture, etc.).
  6. 6. Major Findings of the Research Motivation and Attrition of Students Online Although learning is essential to learning no matter the context, it is particularly critical when learning online, where students engage the material, how, and how long, is entirely within their control (Sansone, Fraughton, Zachary, Butner, & Heiner, 2011). Students performed at a much higher level when they wanted to learn, when they were excited about the content. According to Artino & Stephens (2006), students’ use of learning strategies in an online course can be explained, in part, by their motivational beliefs and attitudes toward the learning task.
  7. 7. Major Findings of the Research (cont.) Time Versus Student Achievement I worked with the basic assumption that the more time a student put into their online learning environment, the more successful they become. According to a study conducted by Beaudoin (2002), he found that students who spent more time logged into a class positively influenced their learning perceptions even when the students were not visibly participating by posting messages, participating in synchronous discussions, etc., while logged in. However, the mean course grades for the “invisible learners” were lower than those of high-visibility learners. This lends credence to the belief that the more time a student spends logged into their course, the more successful they become.
  8. 8. Major Findings of the Research (cont.) Frequency of Interaction Versus Student Achievement According to Kupczynski et al. (2011), the research devoted to the importance of interaction in web-based learning is extensive, with most concluding that faculty-to-student and student-to-student interactions are important elements of online course design and achievement (Beaudoin, 2002; Picciano, 2002). In fact, Woods (2002) noted that researchers stress the importance of interaction between students and instructors to build strong relationships and foster a sense of community. Students that actively participate in the course, from discussion-based assignments to e-mail conversations between students help foster a stronger interest in the course. This interest translates to a higher overall level of success, as evidenced by their ability to successfully complete the assignments in the course.
  9. 9. Gaps in the Literature 1. In studies pertaining to motivation and self-regulation were “strictly correlational in nature; therefore, one cannot infer causality from the observed relationships” (Artino, & Stephens, 2006). 2. There is a lack of empirical research when detailing low- visibility participation in an online learning environment, and the causes of the lack of participation when pertaining to the frequency of times a student logged into the course (Kupczynski, Gibson, Ice, Richardson, & Challoo, 2011).
  10. 10. Conclusions –Recommendations 1. The author of this review of literature recommends that the relationship between the amount of time spent in the user-friendly online learning environment and student achievement as measured by their ability to perform all assignments in the course supports the overall problem that the greater the amount of time students spend in the user-friendly learning environment provides a greater opportunity for engagement. This increase in engagement is also a direct reflection on an instructor’s ability to generate interest in the course, and a positive reinforcement of a student’s ability to remain focused on successfully completing all assignments in the course. 2. The author of this review of literature recommends that the frequency of interaction in the online learning environment and student achievement directly influences a student’s ability to successfully remain engaged and have a direct impact on their ability to perform all of their assignments in the course. Based on the research I reviewed, the greater the amount of interaction a student has with fellow students and the instructor will determine a student’s ability to be successful. This supports my initial problem statement that the frequency of interaction will determine the overall success value of a student’s online academic experience.
  11. 11. References Cited Artino Jr., A.R., and Stephens, J.M. (2006). Learning online: Motivated to self-regulate? Academic Exchange Quarterly, 10(4), 176-182. Beaudoin, M. F. (2002). Learning or lurking? Tracking the “invisible” online student. Internet and Higher Education, 5, 147-155. Kupczynski, L., Gibson, A.M., Ice, P., Richardson, J., and Challoo, L. (2011). The impact of frequency on achievement in online courses: a study from a South Texas university. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 10(3), 141-149. Picciano, A. G. (2002). Beyond student perceptions: Issues of interaction, presence, and performance in an online course. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 6(1), 21- 40. Retrieved from http://www.aln.org/publications/jaln/v6n1/pdf/v6n1_picciano.pdf Sansone, C., Fraughton, T., Zachary, J.L., Butner, J., and Heiner, C. (2011). Self-regulation of motivation when learning online: The importance of who, why, and how. Association for Educational Communications and Technology, 59, 199-212. Stewart, A.R., Harlow, D.B., and DeBacco, K. (2011). Students’ experience of synchronous learning in distributed environments. Distance Education, 32 (3), 357-381.

×