0131389033 ppt09

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0131389033 ppt09

  1. 1. CJ 2011 James A. Fagin Chapter 9:Jails and Prisons
  2. 2. After completion of this chapter, students should be able to: Describe the conditions of early colonial jails Explain both the purpose and types of jails Know the purpose behind classification systems Detail the operations of the Federal Bureau of Prisons Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of prison privatizationCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 2
  3. 3.  American colonists constructed harsh jail conditions Cells lacked running water and heat Men, women, and children confined together Prisoners responsible to pay for their own necessitiesCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. 4.  Philadelphia Society to Alleviate the Miseries of Public Prisons  Lobbied the Pennsylvania legislature for humane treatment of prisoners  Renovated the Walnut Street Jail (1790)CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. 5.  Congregate work system prevails over Walnut Street model Single-cell design becomes too expensive Smaller cells at 7 feet long,4 feet wide, 7 feet high Cells stacked on top of each other, known as ‘inside cell block’ architectureCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. 6.  American prisons have highest incarceration rate worldwide  5% of world population holding 25% of world’s prisoners  Over 7.3 million citizens on probation, parole, in jail or in prisonCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. 7.  Three significant factors:  Education and rehabilitation programs  Prohibiting prison-industry from competing in an open marketplace  Civil lawsuits against prison conditionsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. 8.  Short term holding, typically 12 months or less  Majority of inmates are not convicted, but awaiting trial or other pre-trial procedures  Serve as gateway into the criminal justice systemCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9.  Over 3,300 local or county jails  Most municipalities are abandoning their jails as long-term holding facilities  Municipal jails primarily a temporary housing for arrestees until they can be moved to another facility or pay bailCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. 10.  Typically for convicted felons sentenced to a year or more  53% of inmates incarcerated for violent crimes  Inmates examined, assessed, and classified before assignment to a prison facilityCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11.  Some prisoners may be kept out of general population based upon:  Mental instability  Health issues such as AIDS or Tuberculosis  Age (young or old) place them at risk of victimization  Gang members posing security risksCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. 12.  Built in 1934 by newly formed Federal Bureau of Prison  It housed the most violent and highest security- risk inmates in San Francisco Bay  A maximum-security prison without any rehabilitation, educational, or treatment programs  Closed permanently in 1963; now a tourist destinationCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. 13.  Federal prisons are correctional facilities housing inmates convicted of violating federal statutes or crimes upon federal property  Known as the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP)CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. 14.  Federal Bureau of Prisons operates 104 correctional facilities  200,000 inmates  These range from minimum-security prison camps to administrative maximum  Feds have a lower recidivism rateCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. 15.  Because of overcrowding and budget constraints, as well as the high costs of prison construction and staffing, some states allow private security companies to administer services Not allowed in every stateCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 15
  16. 16.  HIV/AIDS  Communicable Diseases  Hepatitis C  Tuberculosis  Mental Illness  8th Amendment prevents ‘cruel and unusual’ treatment, thus requiring adequate health careCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. 17.  Hands-off (prior to Warren Court era)  Hands-onCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 17
  18. 18.  A place where people eat, sleep, and work together on a daily basis without contact with the outside world. A lack of social skills develops in this environmentCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 18
  19. 19.  A socialization process by which new inmates accept the values of the prison lifestyle  For example, prison subculture language called ‘argot’CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 19

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