Art Webquest

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Webquest activity for visual art.

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  • Nice work, this looks like fun. I hope I can try something like this sometime soon with my kids.
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Art Webquest

  1. 1. Mystery Exhibition Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10th Grade Visual Art Designed by Sarah Ungstad [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  2. 2. Introduction Title Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You are the new exhibition coordinator at the local museum of modern art. For your first exhibition the museum director wants you to plan a show featuring a modern artist. The director calls you up with the information, but you are out of your office, so the director leaves a message on your voicemail. When you get the message, it is jumbled and hard to understand because the director is distracted packing her bags for the new hot spot vacation spot, Antarctica. You were able to decipher parts of the message, though, but not the artist’s name. You are in a tough spot. You need to impress the director with your first show but the museum director has left for her rendezvous with the penguins and is unreachable. Time for a little artistic detective work. Using the information you were able to salvage, determine the artist and set up the exhibition before the museum director gets back.
  3. 3. The Task Introduction Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>To create this exhibition you will have to do the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine who the artist is from the salvaged information. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give a brief biography of the artist. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain the artist’s style/way of working with his/her medium. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Briefly explain the artist’s associated artistic movement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss the artist’s role in his/her associated artistic movement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collect appropriate pieces of the artist’s work to be exhibited. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use the web to help you find information and pictures. Once you have collected your data, assemble it into a PowerPoint presentation to present the director for approval. </li></ul>Title
  4. 4. The Process Title Introduction Task Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The museum director returns in a week and you just cannot get all the work done by yourself. So you enlist the aid of an art historian. Together, you two will be able to figure out who the director has in mind and assemble the exhibition plans in time for the director to review. Here’s what you need to do: 1. Break up into groups of two. 2. Assign roles (Exhibition Coordinator and Art Historian). 3. Examine notes from director’s message… -American sculptor -early/mid twentieth century -mobile and stabile -kinetic … and determine the artist . 4. Once you know who it is, research the artist using the web. The art historian should find information on the artist’s life, style, movement, and role in movement/art history. Choose information that is pertinent to the art work and exhibition. The exhibition coordinator should find images (using creativecommons.org ) of the artist’s work (make sure that they are the artist’s and not an impersonator’s) that exemplify the artist’s artistic career the best. 5. After you have collected your information and images, the exhibition director should assemble it into a PowerPoint to present to the museum director (the class and teacher) when she returns. Remember to include a bibliography.
  5. 5. Evaluation Example: Title Introduction Task Process Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Relevance and accuracy of information Information presented is limited, incorrect, and/or not relevant to project. Information in relatively limited, shows some errors in accuracy, and is partly relevant to project. Information is accurate and is relevant to project. Few errors. Information is completely accurate and relevant. No apparent errors. Image choice Images are not relevant to assignment; images are not of artist’s work; images are poor quality; images not from creativecommons. Images are partly relevant; some images not of artist's work; some poor quality; some images from creativecommons. Images are relevant; all are of artist’s work; image quality is good; creativecommons used. Images are relevant; all are of artist’s work; image quality is good. Shows excellent range in images; creativecommons used. PowerPoint and presentation PowerPoint is poorly put together; poor transitions; presentation hard to follow. PowerPoint shows some effort; transitions seem shaky but thought about; presentation flows but with hiccups. PowerPoint put together well; transitions work and are thought out; flows well with few hiccups. PowerPoint put together well; transitions work and are thought out; flows without interruption. Mechanics and organization Poor grammar and organization interfere a lot with audience comprehension. Some grammatical errors and organizational flaws but audience still able to follow. Little grammatical or organizational errors. Easy to follow. No grammatical organizational errors. Easy to follow. Group work Group members show little evidence of working together and doing their parts. Group members show evidence of working together and doing their parts but with difficulty. Group members show evidence of working together and doing their parts with little difficulty. Group members worked well together and did their parts.
  6. 6. Conclusion Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Credits [ Teacher Page ] By completing this activity, you have not only used your sleuthing abilities to uncover the mystery artist, but assemble an exhibition on his/her work! College art students and people that work at museums and galleries do this all time. You have also gotten a taste of modern art in the process. Hopefully this activity has peeked your curiosity about modern and contemporary art and their many complexities.
  7. 7. Credits & References Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ] The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/American-artists-20th.html Image credits: creativecommons.org- www.lindapaul.com www.surreycc.gov.uk www.orientaltrading.com
  8. 8. Mystery Exhibition (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits A WebQuest for 10th Grade Visual Art Designed by Sarah Ungstad [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  9. 9. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Learners Standards Process Resources Credits This activity was developed as part the Colorado State University’s School of Education class EDUC331: Educational Technology and Assessment. This lesson is designed to introduce students to modern art. Presenting students with the task of researching a pivotal figure in art history gives students the opportunity to understand part of American culture and history through art. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  10. 10. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Standards Process Resources Credits This lesson is rooted in high school art but extends into history. The 10 th grade level is arbitrary. Since this activity involves an American artist (Alexander Calder), it should coincide with whenever the students take American history. The teacher can change the artist for whatever region the students are studying in history. In addition, this activity is appropriate for the high school level because it deals with very abstract concepts (especially for modern and contemporary art) and connections. Students will need a basic knowledge of American history and art history to relate the artist to his/her associated movement. In addition, they will have to have some background knowledge of the artist’s medium and technique. Sculpture and abstraction in this case. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  11. 11. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Process Resources Credits <ul><li>What will students learn as a result of this lesson? Describe the outcomes succinctly. Use the language of existing standards. For example: </li></ul><ul><li>Colorado Visual Arts Standards Addressed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>-describing the functions, meanings, and significance of works of art within various cultures. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>-evaluating, analyzing, and interpreting works of art as related to the history and culture of various people. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>-interpreting meaning in works of art. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>-evaluating works of art using critical analysis and aesthetic inquiry. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>-demonstrating the ability to form and defend appropriate judgments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In addition, this activity encourages teamwork, critical thinking (is this information/image relevant to the exhibition?), and problem solving (who is the artist?) </li></ul></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  12. 12. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Resources Credits 1. Break up into groups of two. 2. Assign roles (Exhibition Coordinator and Art Historian). See note below about assigning groups 3. Examine notes from director’s message… -American sculptor -early/mid twentieth century -mobile and stabile -kinetic … and determine the artist . 4. Once you know who it is, research the artist using the web. Recommend students use “.org” or “.edu” cites The art historian should find information on the artist’s life, style, movement, and role in movement/art history. Choose information that is pertinent to the art work and exhibition. The exhibition coordinator should find images (using creativecommons.org ) of the artist’s work (make sure that they are the artist’s and not an impersonator’s) that exemplify the artist’s artistic career the best. Demonstrate creativecommons.org 5. After you have collected your information and images, the exhibition director should assemble it into a PowerPoint to present to the museum director (the class and teacher) when she returns. Remember to include a bibliography. The lesson should take about a week. Assign on Monday and let the students poke around the web. Tuesday and Wednesday students should collect their data and build their PowerPoints Thursday. Friday they should present. It will intertwine art and history. When assigning groups, it would be a good idea to pair students that are artistic or enthusiastic about art with those who are not. This would help prevent the later from disregarding the activity as important and putting little effort into it. This activity requires that the teacher have background knowledge in art history, especially that within the last century. Additionally, the teacher should have some background of the time and place the artist lived in. Variations The artist can always be changed to someone more appropriate to what the students are studying in art or history. I chose Alexander Calder because of his uniqueness and approachable art. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  13. 13. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Credits <ul><li>Here are some recommended materials for the activity: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class set of art history books. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E-mail accounts if students want to communicate outside of class. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web browser and PowerPoint software. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>http://www.artcyclopedia.com/index.html has an artist database students can search for the artist with. </li></ul><ul><li>One teacher, the art teacher, is all that is really necessary. Communications with the student’s history teacher would help the art teacher choose an artist that is more appropriate though. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  14. 14. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Success should be gauged on how well students can relate the artist’s work to the artist’s and their culture and/or history. If students make higher level connections between the artwork and other subjects, it is a good bet that the students have developed an understanding of the artist and the artwork. Teacher Script Conclusion Group members worked well together and did their parts. Group members show evidence of working together and doing their parts with little difficulty. Group members show evidence of working together and doing their parts but with difficulty. Group members show little evidence of working together and doing their parts. Group work No grammatical organizational errors. Easy to follow. Little grammatical or organizational errors. Easy to follow. Some grammatical errors and organizational flaws but audience still able to follow. Poor grammar and organization interfere a lot with audience comprehension. Mechanics and organization PowerPoint put together well; transitions work and are thought out; flows without interruption. PowerPoint put together well; transitions work and are thought out; flows well with few hiccups. PowerPoint shows some effort; transitions seem shaky but thought about; presentation flows but with hiccups. PowerPoint is poorly put together; poor transitions; presentation hard to follow. PowerPoint and presentation Images are relevant; all are of artist’s work; image quality is good. Shows excellent range in images; creativecommons used. Images are relevant; all are of artist’s work; image quality is good; creativecommons used. Images are partly relevant; some images not of artist's work; some poor quality; some images from creativecommons. Images are not relevant to assignment; images are not of artist’s work; images are poor quality; images not from creativecommons. Image choice Information is completely accurate and relevant. No apparent errors. Information is accurate and is relevant to project. Few errors. Information in relatively limited, shows some errors in accuracy, and is partly relevant to project. Information presented is limited, incorrect, and/or not relevant to project. Relevance and accuracy of information Score Exemplary 4 Accomplished 3 Developing 2 Beginning 1
  15. 15. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits 1. Bring class to computer lab. 2. Read aloud the introduction and task slides to class. 3. Break students in pairs as mentioned in teacher’s process slide. 4. Have students follow you on their computers. 5. Click on art cyclopedia link. 6. Show them the links at the top left that navigate artist search. 7. Allow students to try to find artist. 8. If they have trouble, recommend clicking “medium” and then looking at the director’s notes. 9. Once the students have figured out who the artist is, direct the students to either any search engine for the information or to creativecommons.org for pictures. (end of day one) 10. Explain the importance of using creativecommons for pictures due to copyright laws. In addition, show them how to use creativecommons.org. 11. Recommend they use websites that end in “.org,” “.gov,” or “.edu” so they can be sure the information they collect is accurate. 12. When the students near the point were they start creating their PowerPoints, make sure everybody is familiar with PowerPoint. If not, either help them along with theirs or ask another group member or the lab monitor to assist them. (around third or fourth day) 13. Have students give presentations on the final day of the activity. This page is linked to the Process segment off of the Teacher Page Evaluation Conclusion
  16. 16. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits This activity allows students to explore part of their’s or another’s culture and history through visual art. It can provide excellent supplementary knowledge and understanding to history as well. It could also get students interested in the arts. Evaluation Teacher Script
  17. 17. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeassess/documents/standards/visarts.pdf Image credits: creativecommons.org- http:// www.vicbearcroft.co.uk www.uky.edu Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion

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