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Opening Keynote speech: Christian Bason (ServDes 2016)

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Keynote presentation from ServDes16: Service Design and Innovation Conference 2016, Copenhagen.

Watch the full video streaming here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80qi-8-AxjY

Christian Bason (Director of Danish Design Center) will discuss how design as a catalyst of human-centred processes change can be a powerful vehicle for exploring new geographies, understood as alternative governance and business models. Christian will take departure in his extensive doctoral research and experience from MindLab (the Danish government’s internal innovation team) and the Danish Design Centre, which experiments with the value of design for business and society. He will also share insights from his upcoming book “Leading Public Design: Discovering the Next Governance Model” (Policy Press: Forthcoming 2017), and discuss how new territories of design and of public governance potentially seem to converge.

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Opening Keynote speech: Christian Bason (ServDes 2016)

  1. 1. SERVICE DESIGN AS A VEHICLE FOR EXPLORING NEW GEOGRAPHIES CHRISTIAN BASON Chief Executive Danish Design Centre
  2. 2. “To see that a situation requires inquiry is the first step in inquiry.” John Dewey (1938)
  3. 3. EXPLORING DESIGN GEOGRAPHIES
  4. 4. How can design (continue to) contribute to innovation in Denmark’s business and society?
  5. 5. “Managers, as designers, are thrown into situations that are not of their own making yet for which they are responsible to produce a desired outcome. They operate in a problem space with no firm basis for judging one solution as superior to another, and still they must proceed.” Boland & Collopy (2004)
  6. 6. As they face increasingly complex problems, policy makers are looking to expand their policy options, and to create interventions that are more ”human centred” and which create better societal outcomes. But how?
  7. 7. Policy Press 2010 INNOVATION IN GOVERNMENT How to enable the public sector to create solutions that work better for people? -> Common language, capacity, co-creation, courage.
  8. 8. Gower Ashgate 2014 POLICY-MAKING What does it mean to create policies by using design methods? -> Design as a systematic approach to citizen-centered innovation Design for policy Chris&an Bason (ed.)
  9. 9. Gyldendal Business 2016 LEADERSHIP How can you as a leader use design approaches to create change? -> Leading design processes in practice; engaging with design
  10. 10. What policy makers need: A set of approaches and tools that can help policy leaders on a journey of discovery. The leadership to drive change. A clearer picture of what kind of public governance might emerge.
  11. 11. DESIGN SOCIAL COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIC
  12. 12. Craft vs Mass production? ’Heroic’ designer vs Co-designer? Product design vs Service design? Growth vs Social change? The splintering of design
  13. 13. A design approach is about engaging every relevant stakeholder, including citizens, much earlier in the policy process than we do today.
  14. 14. A new path for policy design? A more ambitious, but also more humble approach Source: MindLab
  15. 15. A new path for policy design? Involving citizens and stakeholders from the start Source: MindLab
  16. 16. EXPLORING THE PROBLEM SPACE 19 Source: DDC
  17. 17. 20 Source: 1508 GENERATING ALTERNATIVE POLICY SCENARIOS
  18. 18. 21 Source: MindLab ENACTING NEW PRACTICES
  19. 19. Design for policy MICRO LEVEL •  How do citizens experience public interventions over time? •  What is meaningful, useful, helpful to them? •  What drives behaviour and, ultimately, outcomes (learning, integration, health, etc.)? MACRO LEVEL •  What interventions? •  Which organisational structures and processes? •  What type and way of funding? •  What regulation?
  20. 20. LEADERSHIP DESIGN ENGAGEMENT AS AN EXTREME PERSPECTIVE ON LEADING CHANGE
  21. 21. “A design attitude views each project as an opportunity for invention that includes a questioning of basic assumptions and a resolve to leave the world a better place than we found it.” Boland & Collopy (2004)
  22. 22. 25
  23. 23. 26 DESIGN AS FUTURE-MAKING DESIGN AS DECISION-MAKING
  24. 24. Towards managing as designing From ”Which decision should I make?” To “What should I make a decision about?”
  25. 25. What is the problem/ opportunity space? What could be a better future situation? How might we expand our range of options to decide about? The decision is there to be created. Decision attitude Design attitude (”managing”) (”designing”) What is the decision space? What is the current or past situation? Which decision should I make? The decision is there to be found.
  26. 26. EXPLORING THE PROBLEM SPACE GENERATING ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS ENACTING NEW PRACTICES #1 Challenging assumptions #2 Leveraging empathy #3 Stewarding divergence #4 Navigating the unknown #6 Insisting on value- creation #5 Making the future concrete 6 LEADERSHIP ENGAGEMENTS WITH DESIGN
  27. 27. EXPLORING THE PROBLEM SPACE 30 Source: DDC
  28. 28. ”It was an eye-opener”. #1 CHALLENGING ASSUMPTIONS 31
  29. 29. ”Sometimes you have to make a choice. Citizens first, or employees first?” #2 LEVERAGING EMPATHY 32
  30. 30. 33 Source: 1508 GENERATING ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS
  31. 31. ”We briefly told them this, and then we played the sound bites from patient interviews. What we wanted was to disturb them.” #3 STEWARDING DIVERGENCE 34
  32. 32. ”It was a loss of control, but it was a positive loss of control.” #4 NAVIGATING THE UNKNOWN 35
  33. 33. 36 Source: 1508 ENACTING NEW PRACTICES
  34. 34. ”What else could be crazy?” #5 MAKING THE FUTURE CONCRETE 37
  35. 35. Source: Izone
  36. 36. ”I want everybody to win.” #6 INSISTING ON (DOUBLE) VALUE 39
  37. 37. Return on Investment (ROI): 23:1 over 3 years. MindLab
  38. 38. GOVERNANCE ”THE BUSINESS MODEL OF GOVERNMENT”: EMERGENCE OF THE NEXT PARADIGM?
  39. 39. Emerging public management Emerging design Opening up Recognising the need to deal more proactively with emergence, turbulence, complexity Embracing new social and policy contexts; adopting disciplines such as anthropology into design practice Focus shift Shift from focusing on political and systems level to (also) engaging and differentiating user level experience, outcomes, public value Shift from supporting industrial mass production to increased individualisation, tailoring of services and products to (co-create) value Transforming discipline Search for new tools to achieve change and innovation; recognising that new processes, skills are needed Offering new tools for stakeholder engagement and collaboration; changing role of designers in relation to organisations and users Implications More systematic innovation in governance and focus on interactions/relations with citizens Move to strategically position design to support innovation processes in public organisations Converging territories?
  40. 40. Some governance alternatives Traditional public administration New Public Management X governance? Context Stable Competitive Continuously changing Population Homogeneous Atomized Diverse Needs/problems Straightforward, defined by professionals Wants, expressed through the market Complex, volatile and prone to risk Strategy State and producer centred Market and customer centred Shaped by civil society Governance through actors Hierarchies Public servants Markets Purchasers and providers Clients and contractors Networks and partnerships Civic leadership Key concepts Public goods Public choice Public value Benington & Hartley (2001)
  41. 41. EXPLORING THE PROBLEM SPACE GENERATING ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS ENACTING NEW PRACTICES Current governance paradigm TRADITIONAL + NPM Emerging governance paradigm OUTCOME CENTRED •  Ques&oning assump&ons •  Leveraging empathy •  Stewarding divergence •  Naviga&ng discomfort •  Making the future concrete •  Insis&ng on public value
  42. 42. Relational: Shift in relationship with users towards outcomes   Networked: Activating new or different resources beyond primary users   Interactive: New artefacts to mediate and facilitate collaborative governance processes   Reflective: Understanding the word more qualitatively, exploratorily   Contours of a new governance territory?
  43. 43. Outcomes Bureaucratic governance achieved through Outcome centred governance achieved through Efficiency Scale Standardization Specialization Relations Networked Individualisation Prevention Predictability and objectivity Hierarchical management Recruitment practices Rule-based Adaptability Empathy Embracing complexity Procedural fairness Uniformity of rules no matter the context Equality in terms of activities Differentiation of processes to fit with differing contexts Equality in terms of outcomes Democracy Transparency of basis for making decisions Transparency of means to achieve outcomes Performance of a new paradigm?
  44. 44. To create better experiences and outcomes for citizens we should be prepared to (re)design everything.
  45. 45. ?
  46. 46. ddc.dk

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