Social Media in the City Dec 2012

507 views

Published on

Social Media Performance Index by Sociagility

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
507
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Social Media in the City Dec 2012

  1. 1.  Social Media in The CityBenchmarking the corporatesocial media performance of the FTSE 100In association with the PRCADecember 2012Web:  www.sociagility.com  |  Email:  hello@sociagility.com  |  Twitter:  @sociagility  |  +44  (0)20  7193  6793  
  2. 2.   Social Media in The City Contents     Foreword   3   Introduction   4   Summary   5   Why  corporate  social  media  performance  matters   7   Study  scope  and  methodology   11   Leaders  and  laggards   13   The  FTSE  100  Social  Performance  Index  2012   16   Sector  benchmarks   20   Engagement  platforms   24   LinkedIn  –  an  ideal  corporate  social  media  platform?   26   Social  media  performance  and  financial  performance   28   Return  on  social  –  the  need  for  social  KPIs   30   Conclusions  and  recommendations   31   Appendix  I:  About  the  authors   33   Appendix  II:  Sociagility  –  social  media  performance  consultants   34   Appendix  III:  About  the  PRCA   35   Appendix  IV:  The  PRINT™  Methodology   36         ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  2  
  3. 3.   Social Media in The City Foreword   By  Francis  Ingham,  Director-­‐General  of  the     Public  Relations  Consultants  Association   Like  the  PRCA,  Sociagility  believes  that  effective   social  communications  creates  competitive   advantage  for  brands  and  organisations.     I  am  therefore  very  pleased  to  introduce  their  first  ever  purely  quantitative  and   comparative  study  of  the  social  media  performance  of  the  FTSE  100.  I  hope   viewing  these  fascinating  results  will  encourage  many  more  communications   departments  to  take  a  much  closer  look  at  their  social  media  strategies.   We  have  now  reached  a  point  where  social  media  engagement  should  be   embraced  not  avoided.  However,  a  recent  PRCA  study  found  that  at  a  senior   level  17%  of  organisations  still  do  not  understand  social  media.  This  compares  to   66%  of  board  members  who  saw  social  media  as  an  opportunity,  2%  that  saw  it   as  a  threat,  and  2%  that  feel  social  media  is  not  relevant.     To  consider  social  media  as  irrelevant,  or  to  continue  to  misunderstand  it,   places  organisations  at  a  competitive  disadvantage  to  their  rivals.  We  must  all   now  recognise  that  proactive,  strategic  social  media  communications  can  work   to  enhance  our  brands  and  protect  our  reputations.  Particularly  in  a  crisis,  our   first  response  is  increasingly  made  via  ‘the  thin  social  line’.   Yes,  social  communication  comes  with  a  risk  –  we  must  be  very  careful  to  put   the  right  strategies  and  resources  in  place.  However,  it  would  be  a  far  greater   risk  to  let  our  social  media  policy  simply  stagnate.     Business  now  operates  in  an  online  and  connected  world  and  we  should  view   social  media  as  a  fact  of  everyday  communications  and  engagement.  Senior   management  and  their  communications  teams  must  make  it  their  duty  not  to   be  left  behind.     Francis  Ingham         ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  3  
  4. 4.   Social Media in The City Introduction   It  is  still  early  days  in  the  ‘social  media  revolution’.  As  companies  absorb  its   implications,  the  default  position  is  that  it  is  a  matter  mainly  for  the  marketing   or  communications  department.  In  creating  this  study,  we  hope  to  focus   attention  on  what  we  believe  to  be  true:  that  social  media  performance  really   matters  for  corporate  brands;  that  it  is  a  competitive  issue;  and  this  should  be   of  concern  to  the  whole  C-­‐suite.   The  research  methods  we  have  used  are  completely  quantitative  and   objectively  measure  the  comparative  performance  of  the  FTSE  100.  We  have   assessed  performance  on  the  web,  Twitter,  Facebook  and  YouTube  using  our   established  PRINT™  methodology  (already  used  for  a  variety  of  previous   reports).  Separately,  we  have  taken  a  similar  quantitative  approach  to  LinkedIn   -­‐  a  first,  we  believe.  Together,  we  think  they  provide  a  potential  KPI  for  social   media  communications.   As  with  any  ranking  there  are  winners  and  losers.  Some  of  these  are   predictable  but  there  are  some  big  surprises  too  –  from  individual  companies   and  from  whole  sectors.   We  have  made  no  attempt  to  investigate  or  understand  individual  company   strategies  for  corporate  social  media  communication.  Nevertheless,  major   differences  in  performance  do  emerge  purely  from  the  data.  In  some  cases   these  are  clearly  driven  by  a  deliberate  strategy  –  in  others,  apparently,  by  the   absence  of  one.     Specific  company  plans  to  improve  social  media  performance  must  of  course   depend  on  an  individual  approach,  taking  into  account  a  host  of  factors  we   cannot  know  about.  However,  we  hope  that  the  general  trends  we  have   observed  will  be  of  general  use  –  to  the  FTSE  100  and  beyond  –  and  focus   attention  on  the  neglected  area  of  the  ‘social  corporate’.         ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  4  
  5. 5.   Social Media in The City Summary   The  Social  Media  in  the  City  study  suggests  that  the  majority  of  the  FTSE  100   may  be  at  a  competitive  disadvantage  by  failing  to  engage  effectively  with   social  media  networks  like  LinkedIn,  Twitter,  Facebook  and  YouTube.     While  there  are  some  high  performers,  including  some  companies  from   surprising  sectors,  the  research  indicates  that  most  companies  do  not  regard   social  media  and  networks  as  important  for  corporate  communications.   However,  social  media  are  used  by  a  variety  of  stakeholders,  by  commentators   and  by  mainstream  media.   Report  highlights   • Two-­‐thirds  of  FTSE  100  companies  perform  below  the  group  average  on   main  social  media  networks   • Shell,  AstraZeneca  and  Sainsbury’s  lead  the  ranking  of  the  best-­‐performing   companies   • Some  top  performers  come  from  surprising  sectors.  For  example,  the   mining  firm  Vedanta  and  computer  chip-­‐manufacturer  ARM  Holdings  both   appear  in  the  top  10   • The  highest  performing  FTSE  sector  is  pharmaceuticals  and  biotechnology,   followed  by  oil  and  gas  producers  and  retailers   • Only  one-­‐fifth  of  FTSE  100  companies  have  an  active  company  page  on   LinkedIn   • Statistically  significant  correlations  found  between  social  media   performance  and  subsequent  daily  share  price  movement;  higher  social   media  performance  scores  associated  with  positive  changes  in  share  price     The  research  was  conducted  in  November  this  year.  It  used  Sociagility’s   quantitative  PRINT™  performance  measurement  system  to  assess  the   corporate  social  media  profiles  of  all  FTSE  100  listed  companies.  Performance   scores  were  derived  for  each  social  media  network  and  combined  to  create  an   overall  Social  Performance  Index  (SPI).     The  SPI  leadership  group  is  unexpectedly  diverse.  While  the  top  20  includes   four  of  the  FTSE  100’s  six  retail  companies,  this  group  also  includes  non-­‐ consumer  facing  brands  like  mining  firm  Vedanta,  computer  chip-­‐manufacturer   ARM  Holdings  and  BAE  Systems.  Only  one  bank,  Barclays,  makes  the  top  20   group.   There  are  some  surprising  sector  laggards.  The  Insurance  sector  as  a  whole,  for   example,  scores  well  below  the  FTSE  100  average  and  only  one  company,  Aviva,   even  makes  the  SPI  top  30.     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  5  
  6. 6.   Social Media in The City While  most  companies  (95%)  have  a  LinkedIn  presence,  frequently  as  a  result  of   employee  activity,  only  one-­‐fifth  have  an  actively  managed  company  page  and   just  12%  saw  any  kind  of  audience  engagement  over  the  course  of  a  week.  A   separate  quantitative  analysis  ranks  the  FTSE100  based  on  three  attributes:   Popularity;  Activity;  and  Engagement.  Shell  leads  this  LinkedIn  ranking.   The  report’s  authors  argue  that  under-­‐performing  companies  may  be  incurring   a  reputational  disadvantage  internationally  compared  with  competitor   companies  that  engage  with  social  media  successfully.  Previous  Sociagility   studies  have  shown  a  close  correlation  between  PRINT™  rankings  and   measures  for  brand  strength  and  growth  and  sales.         ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  6  
  7. 7.   Social Media in The City Why  corporate  social  media  performance  matters   The  emergence  of  fast-­‐growing  platforms  that  facilitate  connection  and   sharing  (Facebook,  Twitter,  YouTube  et  al)  is  transforming  the  way  that  people   discover  and  consume  information.  The  highly  personal  way  that  people   engage  with  each  other  via  these  ‘social’  media  has  redefined  their   expectations  of  how  organisations  engage  with  them  –  and  vice  versa.     While  brands  are  first  and  foremost  about  genuine  performance,  they  are  also   about  peoples’  perceptions,  created  both  by  what  brands  say  about   themselves  as  well  as  ‘what  people  say  about  you  when  you’ve  left  the  room’.   As  audience  communication  preferences  migrate  from  traditional  to  social   media,  so  too  must  the  company’s  communications  attention.     This  is  hardly  a  novel  observation  for  the  world’s  leading  brands.  Most   sophisticated  brands  and  companies  recognize  that,  in  an  increasingly   competitive  online  environment,  accentuated  by  current  economic   circumstances,  social  media  and  networks  are  becoming  critically  important.     But  does  a  good  social  media  performance  actually  matter  for  corporate   audiences?   We  would  not  be  in  business  if  we  didn’t  think  so,  and  it  is  reassuring  that  a   majority  of  FTSE  100  companies  apparently  agree…  or  at  least  enough  to  have   a  social  media  presence  of  some  kind.  But  not  everyone’s  equally  keen  –  or   capable.  Two-­‐thirds  perform  below  average  for  the  group.   Who’s  on  what?   First,  by  ‘corporate’,  we  mean  the  overall  business,  rather  than  its  constituent   companies  or  brands.  For  some  ‘company  brands’,  of  course,  this  is  the  same   brand  name.  Specifically,  for  the  purposes  of  this  study  we  have  looked  at  the   online  profiles  of  the  entity  actually  listed  on  the  London  Stock  Exchange,  the   PLC.   The  breakdown  for  FTSE  100  usage  of  the  four  most  common  public  platforms   measured  by  PRINT™  is  as  follows:   • 100%  of  the  FTSE  100  have  a  website  aimed  at  corporate  audiences   • 72%  have  created  some  kind  of  corporate  Twitter  account   • 65%  have  a  corporate  YouTube  channel   • Only  56%  have  a  corporate  Facebook  page,  perhaps  indicative  of  a  platform   being  perceived  as  more  consumer-­‐focused     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  7  
  8. 8.   Social Media in The City For  this  study,  we  also  looked  at  usage  of  LinkedIn  amongst  the  FTSE  100  group   using  a  quantitative  framework  based  on  PRINT™.  Nearly  100%  of  companies   have  a  dedicated  company  page    -­‐  but  this  can  be  an  almost  totally  passive  act,   as  LinkedIn  creates  these  automatically  for  the  most  well-­‐known  companies.   Only  20%  of  FTSE100  companies  have  what  we  would  consider  to  be  an  active   LinkedIn  presence  –  i.e.  the  company  has  used  it  to  engage  in  the  previous  30   days.  Worse  still,  only  12%  saw  any  kind  of  audience  engagement  over  a  7-­‐day   period.   It  is  hardly  surprising  that  all  the  companies  have  a  corporate  website  –  even  if   some  are  pretty  basic.  But  the  numbers  drop  off  after  that.  So  which  audiences   are  the  companies  that  do  have  a  corporate  social  media  presence  trying  to   reach  and  why  is  that  not  relevant  for  the  others?     Corporate  and  financial  stakeholders   Of  course  there  are  a  whole  host  of  potential  ‘corporate’  stakeholders:   employees,  trades  unions,  suppliers,  local  communities  as  well  as  regulators,   and  legislators.  Most  have  their  associated  interest  groups  and  commentators   plus  a  broad  spectrum  of  ‘traditional’  media  -­‐  trade,  business,  specialist  and   broadcast.  All  these  groups  include  many  important  individuals  who  are  active   users  of  social  media.  For  them,  it  is  just  another  way  to  have  a  relationship   with  a  brand  or  company  –  or  simply  to  keep  track  of  what  they  are  doing.   But  what  about  investors?  Do  they  really  care  about  tweets  and  Facebook   likes…  they  are  just  interested  in  facts  and  figures,  right?  In  any  case,  surely  it  is   more  controllable  for  listed  companies  to  avoid  the  risk  of  engaging  via  these   informal  forums  and  channels  and  stick  with  the  safe  formalities  of  the  annual   report,  face-­‐to-­‐face  presentations,  earnings  statements  –  and  the  traditional   mediated  route  of  the  financial  press.   We  believe  that  this  view  is  short-­‐sighted  for  a  variety  of  reasons.     • Shareholders  and  potential  investors  are  people  too  –  and,  just  like   customers,  likely  to  be  participating  in  social  media,  especially  in  the  UK   and  USA. • Investors  use  social  media  –  private  investors  and  the  ‘wholesale’  City   institutions  like  insurance  companies,  banks  and  brokers,  routinely  use   social  media  as  one  input  for  their  buy/sell/hold  decisions.   • Traditional  media  use  social  media  –  City  commentators,  not  least  the   financial  press,  use  social  media  to  track  news  and  opinion  –  and   themselves  engage  in  creating  social  media  content.       ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  8  
  9. 9.   Social Media in The City Fragmented  responsibility  =  fractured  response   The  Internet  in  all  its  forms  is  a  public  mirror  (sometimes  distorted)  for  brands   and  companies,  showing  the  good  and  the  bad,  highlighting  successful   strategies  and  exposing  corporate  fault-­‐lines.  And  social  media  is  by  no  means   the  only  part  of  corporate  communications  that  can  suffer  from  a  less  than   holistic  approach.     Yet  some  FTSE  100  companies  still  seem  to  be  adopting  a  traditional,  pre-­‐ Internet  (let  alone  pre  Web  2.0)  approach  to  managing  their  social  media   presence.  Specific  audiences  are  assigned  specific  channels  leading  to  a   dangerous  potential  for  gaps,  contradictions  and  confused  or  incoherent   messaging.   A  typical  example  is  Twitter.  Many  companies  just  use  Twitter  corporately  as  a   broadcast  channel  devoted  to  journalists,  with  content  consisting  almost   entirely  of  references  to  news  releases.  Why  is  this  happening?  Well,  it  could  be   a  well  thought  out  strategy  but  it  is  more  likely  to  be  because  someone  in  the   Press  Office  was  seen  to  ‘get’  Twitter…  so  he/she  got  it  forever.  But  while   Twitter  may  undoubtedly  be  useful  to  the  press  office,  it  can  also  be  a  great   tool  for  many  other  departments/functions  such  as  CRM,  HR  etc.   There  is  similar  issue  with  Facebook.  The  perception  –  aided  and  abetted  by   Facebook  and  some  agencies  –  is  that  it  is  purely  a  consumer  platform  and  the   only  role  for  companies  is  product  advertising.  Yet  many  organisations  use  it   successfully  to  reach  out  to  local  communities,  job  seekers  and  even  business   partners.   Perhaps  most  confused  of  all  is  LinkedIn.  Lots  of  reports  say  this  is  a  highly   rated  channel  and  nearly  all  (95%)  of  FTSE100  companies  have  a  presence.  But   only  one-­‐fifth  have  an  active  company  page  and  fewer  still  see  any  audience   engagement.  So  it  looks  like  this  one  is  falling  through  the  cracks:  LinkedIn  is   getting  left  out.   When  things  go  bang   It  is  the  nature  of  the  social  media  universe  to  abhor  a  vacuum  –  whatever  the   opinion,  someone  is  bound  to  have  it.  And,  unlike  formal  news  brands,  citizen   publishers  do  not  need  to  fact-­‐check.  So  even  positive  stories  about  a  company   can  get  wildly  distorted,  while  negative  rumours  can  spread  quickly  –  and  in  a   crisis,  almost  instantaneously.  Any  company  which  lacks  a  listening  presence   and  a  means  to  respond  is  very  vulnerable.  And  companies  that  have  not  built   up  a  solid  body  of  positive  content  and  a  history  of  engagement  will  likely  do     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  9  
  10. 10.   Social Media in The City less  well  managing  negative  episodes  than  those  which  have  already  created   some  kind  of  positive  social  media  context.   The  tendency  for  corporate  communications  departments  to  want  to  ‘control   the  message’  is  understandable  –  for  many  that  is  seen  as  part  of  the  job  spec.   But  the  reality  is  that  old-­‐style  control  is  no  longer  possible  and  a  balanced,   hands-­‐on  approach  to  social  media  engagement  is  the  best  way  to  help  a  brand   achieve  the  reputation  it  desires  and  deserves.   A  competitive  issue   Unsurprisingly,  Sociagility’s  point  of  view  is  that  social  media  have  a  large  and   increasing  important  part  to  play  in  corporate  communications  –  including  the   daily  struggle  for  stakeholders’  confidence  and  support.  We  believe  that  how   well  a  company  engages  corporately  through  social  media  is  a  competitive   issue  internationally  –  both  as  a  risk  to  be  managed  properly  and  an   opportunity  to  gain  advantage.  Furthermore,  as  we  show  later  in  this  report,   statistical  analysis  of  our  research  data  indicates  that  social  media  performance   correlates  significantly  with  share  price  movement.   It  is  therefore  important  not  just  for  corporate  communicators  and  marketing   directors  but  also  for  company  chairmen,  CEOs  and  their  boards.         ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  10  
  11. 11.   Social Media in The City Study  scope  and  methodology   This  study  compared  the  social  media  performance  of  the  companies  that   made  up  the  FTSE  100  as  at  1  November  2012.   The  scores  and  rankings  have  been  calculated  using  Sociagility’s  PRINT™   methodology,  assessing  the  available  websites,  Twitter  accounts,  Facebook   pages  and  YouTube  channels  which  have  been  clearly  designated  as  ‘corporate’   (as  opposed  to  directly  customer-­‐facing)  by  each  organisation.   Each  firm  was  given  the  opportunity  to  contribute  to  the  channel  selection   before  data  was  collected,  in  order  to  ensure  the  most  accurate  representation   of  their  activities.  Where  some  organisations  are  not  using  a  channel  this  is   indicated  in  the  rankings,  however  overall  scores  have  been  calculated  based   on  all  four  platforms.   The  data  for  this  study  was  gathered  from  1–7  November  2012.   Corporate  profiles   Because  our  focus  with  this  research  is  on  corporate  social  communications  we   have  used  corporate  profiles  for  our  comparisons.  As  described  earlier,  this   means  the  websites  and  accounts  associated  with  the  entity  actually  listed  on   the  London  Stock  Exchange.    In  some  cases  this  will  simply  be  the  holding   company.  In  others,  where  the  company  and  product  or  service  brand  names   are  the  same,  it  will  be  the  same  website,  Twitter  account  etc.  However,  where   it  is  not,  i.e.  where  companies  themselves  have  created  specific  online  profiles   for  their  PLC  entity  quite  separate  from  the  constituent  brands,  we  have   selected  these  profiles  to  compare,  reflecting  the  chosen  approach  of  the   company.  We  felt  this  was  the  best  way  to  create  a  level  ‘corporate’  playing   field.     A  full  list  of  the  profiles  analysed  can  be  found  at   http://www.sociagility.com/ftse100.   Unused  channels   Some  companies  do  not  use  all  the  channels  that  PRINT™  measures.  This  may   be  a  matter  of  choice  or  simply  inaction.  Regardless,  because  we  are  looking  at   overall  performance,  for  the  purpose  of  the  overall  Social  Performance  Index   (SPI)  ranking,  all  scores  are  included.     However,  to  allow  a  comparison  based  on  the  efficiency  solely  of  the  channels   used,  we  have  also  analysed  these  separately.  It  is  debatable  how  valid  such  a     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  11  
  12. 12.   Social Media in The City comparison  is  across  the  whole  group.  At  its  extreme,  this  could  mean  that  a   company  that  is  effective  just  on  one  channel  (e.g.  Twitter)  could  outscore  a   company  that  is  marginally  less  effective  on  that  channel  but  better  on  all   others.  Nevertheless,  as  we  say  elsewhere  in  this  report,  channel  strategy  is  an   important  part  of  social  media  performance  and,  for  an  individual  company,   one  channel  may  be  much  more  important  than  another.   The  PRINT™  methodology   Sociagility’s  PRINT™  methodology  compares  organisations’  performance   across  multiple  social  media  platforms,  against  five  key  contributors  to  social   brand  performance  (the  PRINT™  attributes):   • Popularity  –  being  well  known  or  having  a  high  status   • Receptiveness  –  willingness  to  listen  and  engage,  not  just  broadcast   • Interaction  –  communities  that  engage  regularly  and  consistently  with  the   brand   • Network  reach  –  actual  and  potential  audience  size   • Trust  –  influence  and  authority  within  the  community   Scores  for  each  attribute  and  channel  combination  are  calculated  using  over  50   publicly  available  metrics.  Some  of  these  are  raw  measures  (e.g.  friends,   followers,  fans,  subscribers,  etc.)  and  others  are  ratios  that  have  been   specifically  chosen  in  order  to  ensure  a  fair  comparison  (e.g.  engagement  per   thousand  followers,  subscriptions  per  day,  etc.).   In  addition  to  an  overall  score  (the  Social  Performance  Index  or  SPI),  the   ‘popularity’  and  ‘network  reach’  attributes  are  combined  to  provide  the   Awareness  Quotient  (AQ)  and  the  remaining  attributes  made  up  the   Engagement  Quotient  (EQ).   LinkedIn  performance   A  separate  study  was  undertaken  into  the  performance  of  FTSE  100  company   pages  on  LinkedIn.  The  results  of  this  analysis  appear  on  page  26.  A  single  score   was  calculated  using  Sociagility’s  proprietary  LinkedIn  performance  algorithm,   which  looks  at  metrics  including  follower  and  employee  numbers,  product  and   service  recommendations,  and  company  updates,  likes  and  comments.  The   data  for  this  study  was  gathered  on  9  November  2012.       ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  12  
  13. 13.   Social Media in The City Leaders  and  laggards   The  companies  compared  in  this  report  are  by  definition  already  highly   successful  in  terms  of  at  least  one  dimension  of  financial  performance,  ie   capital  value.  But  not  all  FTSE  100  companies  show  a  corporate  social  media   performance  commensurate  with  their  status.  This  may  be  because  they  have   not  participated  in  social  media,  because  they  are  holding  companies  for  other   more  ‘social’  organisations,  or  simply  because  they  are  not  very  good  at  it.   All  organisations  in  this  study  are  being  compared  against  the  full  group,  not   some  theoretical  perfect  score.  So  any  description  of  ‘winners’  and  ‘losers’  is   comparative,  not  absolute.  For  many  such  a  broad  comparison  will  be   unrealistic,  as  they  do  not  actually  compete  with  each  other  in  the  same   category.  So,  as  well  as  the  sector  highlights  in  subsequent  sections,  a  bespoke   company/sector   report   can   be   requested   at   http://www.sociagility.com/ftse100.   Top  20   Rank   Company   FTSE  Sector   Mkt  Cap*   SPI   1   Royal  Dutch  Shell   Oil  &  Gas  Producers   £58,743m   996   2   AstraZeneca   Pharma  &  Biotech   £36,011m   859   3   J  Sainsbury   Food  &  Drug  Retailers   £6,700m   446   4   M&S  Group   General  Retailers   £6,238m   415   5   Next   General  Retailers   £5,885m   362   6   Vedanta  Resources   Mining   £2,972m   322   7   ITV   Media   £3,417m   313   8   ARM  Holdings   Technology  Hardware   £9,587m   311   9   Unilever   Food  Producers   £29,969m   258   10   Wm  Morrison   Food  &  Drug  Retailers   £6,329m   206   11   BAE  Systems   Aerospace  &  Defence   £10,316m   200   12   BT  Group   Fixed  Line  Telecoms   £17,828m   188   13   InterContinental  Hotels   Travel  &  Leisure   £4,149m   177   14   GlaxoSmithKline   Pharma  &  Biotech   £68,171m   166   15   G4S   Support  Services   £3,679m   152   16   Barclays   Banks   £29,072m   147   17   BSkyB  Group   Media   £12,390m   139   18   Reckitt  Benckiser  Group   Household  Goods   £27,172m   137   19   Pearson   Media   £10,131m   136   20   Vodafone  Group   Mobile  Telecoms   £82,353m   132     *  Market  Capitalisation  as  at  8  November  2012     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  13  
  14. 14.   Social Media in The City Shell,  AstraZeneca  and  J  Sainsbury  lead  the  overall  ranking  of  corporate  social   media  performance,  with  the  latter  punching  well  above  its  market   capitalisation.  Indeed,  only  seven  of  the  20  largest  companies  in  the  FTSE  100   appear  in  this  ranking,  making  way  for  a  number  of  smaller  cap  organisations   including  Vedanta  Resources,  ITV,  G4s  and  InterContinental  Hotels  Group  (all   sub-­‐£5,000m  market  capitalisation).   Some  companies  do  not  use  all  the  channels  that  PRINT™  measures.  The  re-­‐ weighted  ranking  below  therefore  compares  performance  based  on  the   efficiency  solely  of  the  channels  used.  However,  at  its  extreme,  this  could  mean   that  a  company  that  is  effective  just  on  one  channel  (e.g.  Twitter)  could   outscore  a  company  that  is  marginally  less  effective  on  that  channel  but  better   on  all  others.   The  result  is  few  changes  in  the  overall  top  20.  Royal  Dutch  Shell  still  leads  the   group,  followed  by  AstraZeneca.  ITV  jumps  to  third  place,  and  a  few  new   entrants  emerge  in  the  form  of  Rolls-­‐Royce  (17th)  and  BP  (20th).   Top  20  (channel  re-­‐weighted)   Rank   Company   We   Tw   Fb   YT   cSPI   1   Royal  Dutch  Shell   x   x   x   x   799   2   AstraZeneca   x   x   x   x   690   3   ITV   x   x       503   4   J  Sainsbury   x   x   x   x   358   5   M&S  Group   x   x   x   x   333   6   Next   x   x   x   x   291   7   Vedanta  Resources   x   x   x   x   258   8   ARM  Holdings   x   x   x   x   250   9   BSkyB  Group   x   x       223   10   Unilever   x   x   x   x   207   11   Wm  Morrison   x   x   x   x   166   12   BAE  Systems   x   x   x   x   161   13   BT  Group   x   x   x   x   151   14   InterContinental  Hotels  Group   x   x   x   x   142   15   Vodafone  Group   x   x     x   142   16   GlaxoSmithKline   x   x   x   x   133   17   Rolls-­‐Royce  Holdings   x     x   x   131   18   G4S   x   x   x   x   122   19   Barclays   x   x   x   x   118   20   BP   x   x   x     113       ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  14  
  15. 15.   Social Media in The City Bottom  10   At  the  bottom  of  the  table,  it  is  perhaps  not  unusual  to  find  FTSE  100   constituents  that  are  not  household  names.  Primarily  in  business-­‐to-­‐business  or   industrialised  sectors,  these  kinds  of  company  scores  are  to  be  expected  when   comparing  to  a  group  that  includes  much  more  familiar  brand  names.   Still,  there  are  one  or  two  surprises  in  the  form  of  Prudential  (90th),  Tate  &  Lyle   (73rd)  and  Admiral  Group  (67th).  The  full  ranking  can  be  found  on  pages  18–19.   Rank   Company     FTSE  Sector   SPI   91   Croda  International   Chemicals   13   92   Meggitt   Aerospace  &  Defence   13   93   CRH   Construction   12   94   Weir  Group   Industrial  Engineering   12   95   Associated  British  Foods   Food  Producers   12   96   Polymetal  International   Mining   11   97   Evraz   Industrial  Metals   10   98   Kazakhmys   Mining   10   99   Capital  Shopping  Centres  Group   REITs   10   100   Babcock  International  Group   Support  Services   8           ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  15  
  16. 16.   Social Media in The City The  FTSE  100  Social  Performance  Index  2012   A  full  ranking  of  social  media  performance  of  all  FTSE  100  companies  appears   on  the  following  pages,  along  with  their  respective  PRINT™,  attribute  and   channel  scores.  For  an  interactive  version  of  this  table,  or  to  request  a  bespoke   company/sector  analysis,  please  visit  http://www.sociagility.com/ftse100.   PRINT™  Scores   Over  50  different  measures  make  up  the  PRINT™  methodology,  based  on   different  attributes  of  corporate  social  media  performance  across  multiple   platforms.  The  scores  that  appear  in  the  table  on  the  following  pages  –  and   elsewhere  in  this  document  –  provide  a  variety  of  different  indicators.   SPI:  Social  Performance  Index   The  SPI  is  an  overall  indicator  of  social  media  performance,  from  which  all  the   scores  below  are  derived.   AQ:  Awareness  Quotient   AQ  isolates  the  impact  of  a  company’s  status  on  the  SPI  by  combining  the   Popularity  and  Network  Reach  attribute  scores.   EQ:  Engagement  Quotient   EQ  isolates  the  impact  of  a  company’s  participation  in  and  engagement  with   social  media  on  the  SPI  by  combining  the  Receptiveness,  Interaction  and  Trust   attribute  scores.   Attribute  Scores   The  five  attribute  scores  are  calculated  across  all  four  channels,  comparing   each  company’s  performance  against  the  mean  of  the  comparison  group  using   over  50  publicly  available  metrics.   Pop:  Popularity   Popularity  measures  how  well  known  or  popular  each  company  is,  based  on   metrics  such  as  page  ranking,  followers/fans,  references,  engagement  levels   and  traffic  data.   Rec:  Receptiveness   Receptiveness  measures  each  companys  willingness  to  actively  listen  and   participate  on  each  platform,  using  metrics  including  linking,  generosity,   responsiveness  to  questions,  and  reciprocation.     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  16  
  17. 17.   Social Media in The City Int:  Interaction   Interaction  measures  the  extent  to  which  people  engage  regularly  with  the   company,  using  metrics  such  as  shares,  activity  and  engagement  levels,  and   conversation  volume.   Net:  Network  Reach   Network  Reach  measures  the  actual  and  potential  audience  size  of  each   company’s  social  media  activity,  based  on  metrics  that  include  linking,  reach,   audience  size  and  subscriber  growth.   Tru:  Trust   Trust  measures  the  influence  and  authority  of  each  company’s  social  media   output,  using  metrics  such  as  influence,  authority,  favourability,  likes  and   ratings.   How  these  scores  can  be  used   When  used  as  part  of  a  formal  social  media  performance  benchmarking   exercise  for  a  brand  or  company  versus  focal  competitors,  these  scores  provide   key  performance  indicators  that  should  be  tracked  over  time.  They  can  also  be   used  as  the  basis  for  comprehensive,  evidence-­‐based  planning  which  identifies   the  channels  and  behaviours  that  offer  a  company  the  greatest  competitive   advantage,  provide  priority  areas  for  action  (and  examples  of  best  practice)   and  can  even  be  linked  to  other  measures  of  business  success  in  order  to  better   quantify  the  financial  impact  of  improvements  in  performance.         ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  17  
  18. 18.   Social Media in The City       PRINT™  Scores   Attribute  Scores   Channel  Scores   Rank   Company   SPI   AQ   EQ   Pop   Rec   Int   Net   Tru   Web   Tw   Fb   YT   1   Royal  Dutch  Shell   996   1092   932   772   184   1529   1412   1082   49   385   3160   390   2   AstraZeneca   859   1086   708   846   335   758   1326   1031   118   3047   225   46   3   J  Sainsbury   446   462   436   466   288   525   458   494   75   184   1113   413   4   M&S  Group   415   508   352   357   252   208   658   598   119   70   1145   324   5   Next   362   358   366   430   287   653   285   157   496   256   495   203   6   Vedanta  Resources   322   128   451   117   53   477   139   824   62   39   30   1157   7   ITV   313   245   359   225   191   825   265   61   853   401   0   0   8   ARM  Holdings   311   407   247   321   482   135   493   125   178   145   106   816   9   Unilever   258   354   193   364   236   190   344   154   167   136   503   224   10   Morrison  (Wm)   206   229   191   189   246   195   270   131   91   58   560   116   11   BAE  Systems   Supermarkets   200   217   189   286   165   244   148   159   196   69   113   422   12   BT  Group   188   212   171   354   354   76   70   84   73   368   24   286   13   InterContinental  Hotels   177   103   226   118   440   115   88   124   78   85   86   460   14   GlaxoSmithKline   Group   166   185   153   162   156   145   209   160   270   117   114   165   15   G4S   152   150   154   229   145   150   71   167   108   55   376   71   16   Barclays   147   127   159   182   258   83   72   137   116   107   227   136   17   British  Sky  Broadcasting   139   252   64   31   106   30   473   55   485   71   0   0   18   Reckitt   Group   Benckiser  Group   137   116   151   117   305   65   116   84   170   113   105   162   19   Pearson   136   85   170   70   334   88   100   90   131   93   35   287   20   Vodafone  Group   132   133   132   135   36   259   130   102   143   51   0   336   21   National  Grid   131   172   104   200   116   79   145   116   65   95   293   71   22   Aviva   123   122   123   174   223   58   69   90   75   115   60   241   23   Rolls-­‐Royce  Holdings   123   253   36   105   15   33   400   60   100   0   0   391   24   United  Utilities  Group   122   58   164   94   76   327   23   90   63   101   9   315   25   Sage  Group   120   150   100   58   173   56   242   72   192   149   114   25   26   WPP   118   169   84   277   122   54   60   75   106   279   68   18   27   Standard  Chartered   116   100   127   93   157   118   107   106   113   138   131   83   28   Royal  Bank  Of  Scotland   112   59   148   66   253   105   52   86   92   95   67   196   29   Rio  Tinto   Group   109   104   112   152   39   204   56   93   98   114   0   223   30   Anglo  American   107   89   119   133   152   81   44   124   82   90   184   71   31   BP   106   110   103   59   65   115   161   129   255   87   81   0   32   Johnson  Matthey   95   144   62   262   61   46   26   78   54   73   196   56   33   Hargreaves  Lansdown   88   46   116   74   231   39   18   77   44   58   0   250   34   Smith  &  Nephew   83   89   79   59   60   64   119   111   79   187   9   56   35   HSBC  Hldgs   81   131   47   112   57   36   150   47   159   53   0   110   36   Tesco   76   83   72   66   71   69   100   76   50   61   0   194   37   Whitbread   75   45   95   71   116   97   19   72   47   59   80   113   38   SABMiller   72   57   82   93   82   80   21   85   59   112   21   97   39   British  American  Tobacco   72   66   75   72   43   130   60   54   146   42   0   98   40   Severn  Trent   71   47   86   72   64   118   23   77   64   61   0   157   41   Standard  Life   67   26   94   40   179   32   13   70   75   61   72   59   42   Centrica   63   36   82   53   111   53   18   83   54   89   0   110   43   Intertek  Group   62   78   52   36   43   64   119   50   119   117   0   14   44   Experian   59   59   60   35   49   62   83   68   70   125   0   43   45   RSA  Insurance  Group   57   38   70   63   133   29   13   49   58   65   107   0   46   SSE   57   51   62   78   58   45   23   83   60   99   0   70   47   Aggreko   57   48   63   33   47   78   63   65   62   107   0   60   48   Diageo   57   47   64   54   84   43   40   64   91   63   0   73   49   Lloyds  Banking  Group   56   58   55   31   79   47   85   39   98   126   0   0   50   Legal  &  General  Group   53   25   73   34   121   37   15   59   120   45   11   38     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  18  
  19. 19.   Social Media in The City                                                             PRINT™  Scores   Attribute  Scores   Channel  Scores   Rank   Company   SPI   AQ   EQ   Pop   Rec   Int   Net   Tru   Web   Tw   Fb   YT   51   Amec   53   42   60   49   79   39   35   63   97   69   0   46   52   Schroders   50   38   59   60   56   40   16   81   57   87   25   32   53   Reed  Elsevier   49   39   56   39   69   35   39   62   108   88   0   0   54   BHP  Billiton   48   51   46   29   35   65   73   40   91   101   0   0   55   BG  Group   45   42   47   43   42   37   42   63   59   51   0   70   56   Aberdeen  Asset   45   44   46   76   66   17   12   54   74   0   37   69   57   Imperial  Tobacco  Group   Management   41   48   37   29   27   43   67   40   50   115   1   0   58   Tullow  Oil   41   37   44   46   53   25   28   55   48   60   1   56   59   British  Land  Co   39   28   47   47   29   48   9   63   46   55   7   48   60   John  Wood  Group   38   20   49   32   74   20   7   54   85   37   0   27   61   Land  Securities  Group   36   28   42   45   38   33   11   55   47   88   0   10   62   Capita   36   25   44   35   72   17   14   43   77   37   1   30   63   Kingfisher   36   17   48   29   37   42   5   66   43   58   0   42   64   Hammerson   35   20   45   29   36   45   10   54   43   43   2   50   65   Burberry  Group   33   14   46   24   114   2   4   23   134   0   0   0   66   Resolution   33   10   49   19   126   0   0   21   133   0   0   0   67   Admiral  Group   33   16   45   28   41   35   4   58   44   45   0   43   68   Eurasian  Natural  Resources   32   12   45   22   110   2   2   23   127   0   0   0   69   Old  Mutual   Corporation   31   16   40   26   69   4   6   49   50   0   1   72   70   Carnival   30   13   42   23   102   0   3   23   121   0   0   0   71   Serco  Group   29   20   35   30   40   31   10   33   75   40   0   0   72   Compass  Group   28   21   33   37   30   18   5   52   40   64   0   9   73   Tate  &  Lyle   27   16   35   26   57   15   6   32   70   39   0   0   74   Rexam   26   18   31   27   4   47   9   43   45   0   0   59   75   Glencore  International   25   16   31   30   54   15   3   25   97   0   4   0   76   Randgold  Resources   25   19   29   36   8   33   3   47   46   0   0   56   77   Xstrata   25   20   28   29   37   19   12   28   67   34   0   0   78   Smiths  Group   25   15   32   24   70   0   7   25   100   0   0   0   79   Petrofac   25   13   33   23   25   47   2   27   63   35   0   0   80   GKN   24   18   28   25   27   6   11   49   61   0   0   33   81   Wolseley   24   15   29   26   43   14   4   30   57   35   0   2   82   IMI   22   14   27   25   56   0   3   25   87   0   0   0   83   Melrose   22   10   29   20   66   0   0   21   86   0   0   0   84   Pennon  Group   21   12   27   23   39   13   1   28   50   34   0   0   85   Bunzl   20   13   24   24   49   1   3   22   79   0   0   0   86   ICAG   19   12   24   24   33   14   1   25   45   32   0   0   87   Antofagasta   18   11   22   21   42   0   1   24   71   0   0   0   88   Fresnillo   17   11   21   22   26   14   1   24   37   32   0   0   89   Shire   15   18   13   26   8   3   10   26   59   0   0   0   90   Prudential   14   16   13   25   10   3   6   25   54   0   0   1   91   Croda  International   13   15   12   25   11   0   5   25   53   0   0   0   92   Meggitt   13   13   12   24   11   1   3   24   50   0   0   0   93   CRH   12   14   11   26   5   4   3   24   49   0   0   0   94   Weir  Group   12   12   12   23   12   1   2   23   48   0   0   0   95   Associated  British  Foods   12   14   11   25   5   3   2   24   47   0   0   0   96   Polymetal  International   11   9   11   18   14   0   0   20   42   0   0   0   97   Evraz   10   13   9   21   4   1   4   21   41   0   0   0   98   Kazakhmys   10   12   9   23   1   0   1   25   40   0   0   0   99   Capital  Shopping  Centres   10   12   9   23   1   0   1   25   40   0   0   0   100   Babcock   Group   International   8   10   7   20   0   1   0   21   34   0   0   0   Group     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  19  
  20. 20.   Social Media in The City Sector  benchmarks   As  the  FTSE  is  based  on  capital  value,  its  sector  spread  is  uneven,  reflecting  the   relative  success  of  different  parts  of  the  national  and  global  economy  at   different  periods,  as  well  as  the  success  of  the  companies  concerned.  Many   FTSE  companies  are  therefore  in  a  group  of  one…  or  two.  For  the  purposes  of   this  analysis,  we  have  omitted  sectors  with  less  than  three  FTSE  100   constituents.  By  so  doing  we  can  see:   • how  average  sector  performances  compare;  and   • any  major  variations  within  sector   In  the  table  below,  seven  sectors  score  above  average  (100)  and  they  are  not   necessarily  the  most  obvious,  consumer-­‐facing  candidates.  Both  Shell’s  and   AstraZeneca’s  strong  performances  are  replicated  across  their  respective   sector  groups,  with  companies  in  the  Pharmaceuticals  &  Biotechnology  and  Oil   &  Gas  producers  sectors  commanding  the  highest  average  SPI  scores.   Sector  performance   Rank   FTSE  Sector   Companies   SPI  (avg)   1   Pharmaceuticals  &  Biotechnology   3   347   2   Oil  &  Gas  Producers   4   297   3   General  Retailers   3   271   4   Food  &  Drug  Retailers   3   243   5   Media   5   151   6   Aerospace  &  Defence   3   112   7   Banks   5   102   8   Food  Producers   3   99   10   Gas,  Water  &  Multiutilities   5   82   11   Travel  &  Leisure   5   66   12   Mining   12   62   13   Financial  Services   3   61   14   Life  Insurance   6   53   15   Support  Services   9   50   16   Oil  Equipment  &  Services   3   38   17   Real  Estate  Investment  Trusts   4   30   18   Industrial  Engineering   3   18     As  well  as  looking  at  the  overall  SPI  score,  we  have  isolated  two  general  factors   that  contribute  towards  this  performance  –  the  Awareness  Quotient  (a   measure  of  status)  and  the  Engagement  Quotient  (a  measure  of  participation     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  20  
  21. 21.   Social Media in The City and  interaction).  Awareness  Quotient  (AQ)  bundles  PRINT™  attributes   Popularity  and  Network  and  tends  to  favour  larger,  more  established   companies  with  larger  communications  spends.  Engagement  Quotient  (EQ)   bundles  the  Receptiveness,  Interaction  and  Trust  attributes.  The  figure  below   maps  these  AQ  and  EQ  scores.  A  low  EQ  combined  with  a  high  AQ  suggests  the   PRINT™  score  is  driven  disproportionately  by  scale  rather  than  social   engagement.     Whilst  it  is  possible  to  analyse  each  sector  in  much  more  detail,  in  this  section   we  focus  on  three  different  groupings:  banks,  financial  services  and  life   insurance;  support  services;  and  gas,  water  and  multi-­‐utilities.   Sector  focus:  Banking,  financial  services  and  life  insurance   Out  of  the  14  companies  that  make  up  the  banking,  financial  services  and  life   insurance  FTSE  sector  groupings,  only  Barclays  and  Aviva  occupy  a  leadership   position.  HSBC  would  appear  to  be  trading  mainly  on  its  status,  with  little  social   media  engagement,  whereas  RBS,  Hargreaves  Lansdown  and  Standard   Chartered  are  punching  well  above  their  weight,  with  higher  engagement  than   awareness  scores.   Although  spread  across  all  four  quadrants  of  the  grid,  the  banking  sector   performs  best  within  this  combined  financial  sector  group.  The  three  financial     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  21  
  22. 22.   Social Media in The City services  companies  trail  slightly  behind  and,  with  the  exception  of  Aviva,  life   insurance  companies  lag  the  rest  of  the  financial  sector.  This  is  the  biggest   surprise  within  this  group,  given  that  almost  all  are  well-­‐known,  consumer-­‐ facing  household  names.     Sector  focus:  Support  services   Rank   Company   Pop   Rec   Int   Net   Tru   1   G4s   229   145   150   71   167   2   Intertek  Group   36   43   64   119   50   3   Experian   35   49   62   83   68   4   Aggreko   33   47   78   63   65   5   Capita   35   72   17   14   43   6   Serco  Group   30   40   31   10   33   7   Wolseley   26   43   14   4   30   8   Bunzl   24   49   1   3   22   9   Babock  International  Group   20   0   1   0   21     With  nine  companies  represented  in  the  FTSE  100,  yet  an  average  of  only  50  on   the  SPI  scale,  the  support  services  sector  is  one  of  the  worst  performers  in  our   analysis.  Indeed,  without  a  strong  showing  from  security  solutions  group  G4S,   the  SPI  for  this  sector  would  drop  to  below  40.     ©  2012  Sociagility  Ltd   Page  22  

×