Successfully reported this slideshow.

Post-Design: Finding beauty in the invisible, and the changing role of the designer.

2

Share

1 of 63
1 of 63

Post-Design: Finding beauty in the invisible, and the changing role of the designer.

2

Share

Download to read offline

From a presentation at IIT ID's In the Loop speaker series, given on 31 March, 2015.

Our roles as designers are dependent on language. We rely on verbal, visual, and temporal languages in order to communicate our work. As our jobs become more than just “design”—from choreographers of natural interfaces to policy makers—there is an inherent conflict with what it means to “practice design.” We are defining ourselves (and being defined) by a term that is overextended. How should we refer to ourselves, and what should the world make of us?

With a new period of design dawning, previous notions of strategy and craft are blurring. We have been given permission to do meaningful work; at this prime moment we must clarify ourselves to establish the continuous integrity of our field. We must articulate the difference between practicing responsible design and simply making.

From a presentation at IIT ID's In the Loop speaker series, given on 31 March, 2015.

Our roles as designers are dependent on language. We rely on verbal, visual, and temporal languages in order to communicate our work. As our jobs become more than just “design”—from choreographers of natural interfaces to policy makers—there is an inherent conflict with what it means to “practice design.” We are defining ourselves (and being defined) by a term that is overextended. How should we refer to ourselves, and what should the world make of us?

With a new period of design dawning, previous notions of strategy and craft are blurring. We have been given permission to do meaningful work; at this prime moment we must clarify ourselves to establish the continuous integrity of our field. We must articulate the difference between practicing responsible design and simply making.

More Related Content

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Post-Design: Finding beauty in the invisible, and the changing role of the designer.

  1. 1. Finding beauty in the invisible, and the changing role of the designer. POST-DESIGN
  2. 2. ?
  3. 3. ? ? What, really, is toasting? How else might toasting happen?
  4. 4. Why do we toast bread? Can we fundamentally change toasting? ???
  5. 5. How can a toaster be made differently? ?
  6. 6. ?
  7. 7. 3 Questions
  8. 8. I CURRENTLY WORK WITH: I HAVE WORKED WITH: STUDIO D RADIODURANS
  9. 9. What do you do?”“
  10. 10. “What do you do?” “I’m a designer.” “Oh, like clothes?”
  11. 11. “What do you do?” “I’m a designer.” “Oh, like a graphic designer?”
  12. 12. “What do you do?” “I’m a designer.” “Oh, like ___________?”
  13. 13. “What do you do?” “I’m a designer.” “Oh, like a UX designer?”
  14. 14. ?
  15. 15. We’re like management consultants with hands.” “ - KENDRA SHIMMELL (MANAGING DIRECTOR @ COOPER; TOTAL BADASS)
  16. 16. [the designer] accepts the responsibility of his position as liaison linking management, engineering, and the consumer and co-operates with all three.” “ - HENRY DREYFUSS (DESIGNING FOR PEOPLE,1955)
  17. 17. DESIGNER = LIAISON
  18. 18. INTELLIGENCE GATHERING Searching the known environment for the condition calling for a decision 1 DESIGN Inventing, developing and analyzing 2 CHOICE Deciding on a particular course 3 Decision-Making: a Designer Research Synthesis Design/ Implementation
  19. 19. DESIGNER = DECISION-MAKER
  20. 20. THIS GUY IS DESIGNER ≠ PROBLEM SOLVER
  21. 21. Craft (form-giving) Strategy (conceptual) WHAT WE’RE SUITED TO MAKE
  22. 22. WHAT WE’RE SUITED TO MAKE CompsBrand
  23. 23. WHAT WE’RE SUITED TO MAKE Task Flows & Use Cases Policy
  24. 24. I spend time with people trying to understand their problems and then work with them to identify and develop creative solutions - sometimes it's an idea or a model, sometimes it's a process, sometimes it’s technologies…” “ - JASON ULASZEK (UX FOR GOOD)
  25. 25. DESIGNER = ENVISIONER, MAKER, REDUCER OF COMPLEXITY
  26. 26. English is the problem!
  27. 27. Funny, everything design/work to me, is in English. The working language is set by the literature, the videos and most of all the tools/programs that we use: and English is the common language. Since moving back [to Sweden], no client has been so small that only Swedes are involved- emails and deliveries are in English.” - KAJSA, SWEDEN / JOOYOUNG, KOREA “
  28. 28. Well, what do I do?
  29. 29. The proportion of a solution needs to balance with its problem: we don't need a battery-powered pooper scooper to pick up dog poop, and we don't need a car that gets 17 MPG to, well, we don't need that car, period. We have to start balancing our ability to be clever with our ability to be smart. They're two different things.” “ - ALLAN CHOCHINOV (COME ON,YOU GUYS KNOW WHO HE IS)
  30. 30. DESIGNER = MAKER OF THE SMALLEST APPROPRIATE THING (WHICH CAN BE NOTHING AT ALL)
  31. 31. QUESTION 1: What do you want to do? How much do you care about defining it? I want to be a designer where there was no “design” before. I want to make as little as possible.
  32. 32. What did you actually design?” “
  33. 33. For details of the work on the “on-the-go” financial product ecosystem designed for Proximity Design in collaboration with Visa and Studio D, see Proximity’s Post on the concept.
  34. 34. By what can you be judged as a designer?” “
  35. 35. TO US: “design” = process
  36. 36. TO A LOT OF THE WORLD (ESP.IN THE STATES): “design” = artifact
  37. 37. “well-designed” BEAUTIFUL “oh, that’s pretty.” CONSIDERED “that took a long time to get right.”
  38. 38. When I went to school, design was a thing I made. Now, it’s more like, ‘How am I thinking about _______ in my work?’” “ - STEVEN EGGERT (DESIGNER & PHOTOGRAPHER)
  39. 39. Mechanical Complexity Digital Complexity Social, Cultural & Political Complexity PRODUCT SOFTWARE COMPLEXITY Where user- centered design dies. POLICY
  40. 40. If what I’m making is 100% invisible, am I still a designer?
  41. 41. ?
  42. 42. What will be the long- term impact of this toaster’s existence? ? ?
  43. 43. QUESTION 2: On what are you being judged? By whom are you being measured? I want to be measured on the outcome of my work, rather than the beauty of the artifacts I create.
  44. 44. What am I doing here?
  45. 45. ROMANCE : RESPONSIBILITY
  46. 46. WHY DO I DESERVE TO BE HERE?
  47. 47. WHY DO I DESERVE TO BE HERE?
  48. 48. WHY DO I DESERVE TO BE HERE?
  49. 49. “the power of design” We have to earn our right to practice what we do - most of all when we practice it on others.
  50. 50. ?
  51. 51. ? ? Does the world really need another toaster?
  52. 52. In 1995, you would charge $250,000 for a website, and nobody would bat an eye. Now you can make one for $100.” “ - COLETTE VARDEMAN (UX DIRECTOR @ RACKSPACE)
  53. 53. What am I doing here, and when should I leave?
  54. 54. QUESTION 3: When should you say no? What do you stand for? I want to make myself and my impact as little as possible, and always have people who keep me in check.
  55. 55. ? This is yours.
  56. 56. Don’t be defined by design - the word, its process or its artifacts.
  57. 57. Thanks. @serota holler@laurenserota.com

×