Symphony No. 1                (In Memoriam, Dresden, 1945)                  Daniel Bukvich             Presented by Mr. Si...
History of this composition   Written as Mr. Bukvich’s master’s thesis dealing    with contemporary notation (1978).   W...
More information   Based on a famous chord used by Duke    Ellington -- C, Db, E, G   Harmonic & melodic ideas are used ...
Where is Dresden, Germany?
Before the Bombing   1920’s was the world focus in fine and    visual arts.   Saxon State Opera Orchestra   Dresden Sta...
I. Prologue   This movement establishes the mood of    impending disaster and presents the    thematic material upon whic...
II. Seeds in the Wind   The title of this movement refers to the    method of "seeding" the bomb target with    jellied g...
III. Ave Maria   The material in this movement reflects upon    the religious and artistic heritage of    Dresden and bec...
IV. Fire Storm   In this movement, the    sounds of the "Fire    Storm" are recreated.    Musically, the last    movement...
Listening to the  Recording
The Story   Rationale for Bombings   The Attacks   Firestorm "Feuersturm"
More Pictures
Air Raid Totals (2 Raids)   ~ 7,000 high explosive bombs   ~ 4,500 “J-bombs”   ~ 400,000+ incendiaries   ~ 25,000-35,0...
Psychological Warfare   Bombers also dropped bundles and    bundles of psychological leaflets   Fake ration cards
Example Leaflet
Personal Reminiscences Collected   “The firestorm [was] incredible, there [were] calls    for help and screams from somew...
Another Reminiscence   “We saw the burning street, the falling ruins and the    terrible firestorm. My mother covered us ...
Dresden Today   Since the re-unification of Germany (1990)   Trying to regain cultural importance
Frauenkirche       1880    2006
Dresden Today   Scars of the attacks still exist
Related information   Berlin/Hamburg bombings   Leaflets are still used in today’s war   War Crime?   The end of the w...
Resources Cited   No Author (2007). Bombing of Dresden in World War II. Retrieved February 15, 2007, from            Wiki...
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Symphony No. 1 - In Memoriam, Dresden, 1945

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Daniel Bukvich This PowerPoint presentation focuses the history of the Dresden bombing, history
Piece Duration: 6 1/2 minutes of the composition and composer, photos of Dresden before and after, and personal
Presentation Duration: 30-45 minutes accounts from the victims of the boming. Seperate from the PowerPoint is a hand-out to
students for simple vocalizations for the spoken German words.

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  • Symphony No. 1 (In Memoriam, Dresden, 1945) by Daniel Bukvich (1978) Piece Duration: 6 1/2 minutes Presentation Duration: 30-45 minutes
  • Famous composition by Daniel Bukvich: Voodoo, and has been recorded world wide. Incorporates contemporary notation.
  • [Play chord on piano, examples of the main melody or harmonic use]
  • Eastern part of Germany.
  • Architecture and music One of the oldest orchestra (1548) – known as the Strauss-Orchestra (due to Richard Strauss’ time spent in Dresden) Also molded by Carl Maria von Weber and Richard Wagner Home to the World’s most important museum and collection of art Many buildings still remain, a lot destroyed in the bombing ~642,000 people lived in Dresden, Germany
  • - RAF (Royal Air Force) Lancaster Bombers
  • St. Olaf Band: A Musical Observance (WCD 29623) Return to slide #6 and scroll through movements as they are performed in the recording.
  • Allied forces discussed numerous months on what would weaken the forces of Germany. One idea was cutting off the supplies in the East (oil, production factories, communication, & railroads) This would also cut of German forces advancing any further East. Served Russia, & Poland well. Dresden was not the only bombed, other major cities bombed including Berlin and Hamburg. Two Air Raids, Dresden population sincerely believed that their baroque beauty would save them from any air raids in the war. Firestorm: oxygen is being consumed and replaced by carbon dioxide, monoxide, and methane. The center of the firestorm reached 800 degrees centigrade. If victims were not burnt alive, they suffocated due to the lack of oxygen. The heat created by the fires mixed with cold air entering the spaces, creating a vacuum which pulled anything in it’s path into the fire. The vacuum was also reported to uproot trees, pulled off roofs of houses, and sucked out air out of air-raid shelters.
  • Not for the weak at heart.
  • - “fire-jet bombs”, Known to the British as “J-bombs”, bombs containing oil and phosphorus - incendiaries: a shell, bomb, or grenade containing napalm, thermite, or some other substance that burns with an intense heat.
  • Psychological warfare comprises the use of propaganda against an enemy, together with such other operational measures of a military, economic, or political nature as may be required to Supplement propaganda. In this sense, "psychological warfare" is a known Operation which was carried on very successfully during World War II under the authority of the Combined and Joint Chiefs of Staff. It is in this sense that some kind of a "Psychological Warfare Unit" was developed in every major theater of war, and that the American military assimilated the doctrines of "psychological warfare."
  • Picture. British leaflet for Germany. Air dropped by balloon in the spring of 1942. Shows Hitler announcing spring and new battles to come. He stands amid piles of dead German soldiers. The text on the reverse shows that Hitler is lying to his people about the losses at the east front.
  • Ask students to read reminiscence silently
  • Ask students to read reminiscence silently again
  • Dresden has been the cultural, economic, and political center of eastern Germany. Has been through repeated destruction, 1491 by fire, bombardment 1760, and uprising of 1849. In the visual and fine art. Rebuilding some of Dresden former landmarks, including Frauenkirche (next slide)
  • - “Church of Our Lady” - Largest section left after the bombing (discolored section)
  • Hotel in Dresden, still serves as a reminder to some of the lives lost in the bombings.
  • Berlin bombing 360+ bombings between 1940-1945, around 20,000+ lives lost, compared to Dresden’s two day bombing Hamburg was bombed numerous times, July 27 “Hiroshima of Germany. One single night of bombing cause 40,000 causalities Psychological warfare still used today in leaflets and media against enemy Discussion about if this would be considered a war crime today. World War II ended four months after the bombing. Was it a necessary bombing?
  • Symphony No. 1 - In Memoriam, Dresden, 1945

    1. 1. Symphony No. 1 (In Memoriam, Dresden, 1945) Daniel Bukvich Presented by Mr. Sierakowski (2007) West Aurora High School Symphonic BandGrade 4
    2. 2. History of this composition Written as Mr. Bukvich’s master’s thesis dealing with contemporary notation (1978). Wanted to use non-traditional sounds for the concert band setting. This composition launched Mr. Bukvich’s career as a band composer. The piece depicts allied bombing on the city of Dresden, Germany on February 13-14, 1945
    3. 3. More information Based on a famous chord used by Duke Ellington -- C, Db, E, G Harmonic & melodic ideas are used with these notes.
    4. 4. Where is Dresden, Germany?
    5. 5. Before the Bombing 1920’s was the world focus in fine and visual arts. Saxon State Opera Orchestra Dresden State Art Collections Baroque and Renaissance architecture Second largest city
    6. 6. I. Prologue This movement establishes the mood of impending disaster and presents the thematic material upon which the rest of the piece is based.
    7. 7. II. Seeds in the Wind The title of this movement refers to the method of "seeding" the bomb target with jellied gasoline and incendiaries. The movement portrays the fury of the bombing attack.
    8. 8. III. Ave Maria The material in this movement reflects upon the religious and artistic heritage of Dresden and becomes a prayer for the victims of the attack.
    9. 9. IV. Fire Storm In this movement, the sounds of the "Fire Storm" are recreated. Musically, the last movement serves as a resolution to the tension built up in the previous three movements.
    10. 10. Listening to the Recording
    11. 11. The Story Rationale for Bombings The Attacks Firestorm "Feuersturm"
    12. 12. More Pictures
    13. 13. Air Raid Totals (2 Raids) ~ 7,000 high explosive bombs ~ 4,500 “J-bombs” ~ 400,000+ incendiaries ~ 25,000-35,000 lives lost in the raids, majority civilians
    14. 14. Psychological Warfare Bombers also dropped bundles and bundles of psychological leaflets Fake ration cards
    15. 15. Example Leaflet
    16. 16. Personal Reminiscences Collected “The firestorm [was] incredible, there [were] calls for help and screams from somewhere but all around [was] one single inferno… suddenly, I saw people again, right in front of me. They scream[ed] and gesticulate[d] with their hands, and then — to my utter horror and amazement — I [saw] how one after the other they simply seem to let themselves drop to the ground. Today I know that these unfortunate people were the victims of lack of oxygen. They fainted and then burnt to cinders.”
    17. 17. Another Reminiscence “We saw the burning street, the falling ruins and the terrible firestorm. My mother covered us with wet blankets and coats she found in a water tub. We saw terrible things: cremated adults shrunk to the size of small children, pieces of arms and legs, dead people, whole families burnt to death, burning people ran to and from, burnt coaches filled with civilian refugees, dead rescuers and soldiers, many were calling and looking for their children and families, and fire everywhere, everywhere fire, and all the time the hot wind of the firestorm threw people back into the burning houses they were trying to escape from.”
    18. 18. Dresden Today Since the re-unification of Germany (1990) Trying to regain cultural importance
    19. 19. Frauenkirche 1880 2006
    20. 20. Dresden Today Scars of the attacks still exist
    21. 21. Related information Berlin/Hamburg bombings Leaflets are still used in today’s war War Crime? The end of the war Would this happen today?
    22. 22. Resources Cited No Author (2007). Bombing of Dresden in World War II. Retrieved February 15, 2007, from Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Website: en.wikipedia.org/wiki /Bombing_of_Dresden_in_World_War_II No Author (2007). Dresden Frauenkirche. Retrieved February 19, 2007, from Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Website: en.wikipedia.org/wiki /Dresden_Frauenkirche#Destruction No Author (2007). Dresden. Retrieved February 13, 2007, from Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Website: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dresden No Author (2007). Bombing of Hamburg in World War II. Retrieved February 19, 2007, from Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Website: en.wikipedia.org/wiki /Bombing_of_Hamburg_in_World_War_II No Author (2007). Bombing of Berlin in World War II. Retrieved February 19, 2007, from Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Website: en.wikipedia.org/wiki /Bombing_of_Berlin_in_World_War_II Irving, D. (2005). Apocalypse 1945: The Destruction of Dresden. London: Parforce UK Ltd. Bukvich, D. (2002). Symphony No. 1: In Memoriam, Dresden, 1945. Retrieved February 13, 2007, from Bukvich Music Website: www.bukvichmusic.com/comp/symphonyno1 /index.asp Bukvich, D. (1981). Symphony No. 1: In Memoriam, Dresden, Germany, 1945 [Score]. Pennsylvania: Wingert-Jones Music.

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