Best	  Practices	  Assignment	                     Teen-­‐Led	  Story	  Times	  in	  the	  Library	                       ...
Goldsmith, Francisca. "Literacy Daycamp At The Library: Collaborating With       Coworkers And Teens." Voice Of Youth Advo...
got me to think a bit broader in my teen-led literacy programming mindset. This articleprofiled a great program from the S...
Additional Articles about                   Teen Volunteering at LibrariesBarban, Leslie. "Building Character And Responsi...
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R buckley lis 506 - annotated bibliography - best practices assignment

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R buckley lis 506 - annotated bibliography - best practices assignment

  1. 1. Best  Practices  Assignment   Teen-­‐Led  Story  Times  in  the  Library     By  Rebecca  Buckley   LIS  506       Annotated Bibliography  Carlson, Virginia. "Summer Teen Volunteers At Pikes Peak Library District." Colorado Libraries 29.3 (2003): 53-54. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This article focuses on teen volunteer program initiatives put in place at the Pikes PeakPublic Library in Colorado. The summer volunteer program utilized teens in all aspectsof library services, from shelving to reading aloud to children. This library has a programcalled “Reading Buddies” where teens mentor kids in grades 1-5 who are reading belowgrade level. Teens are trained to help these young readers comprehend funsupplementary reading as well as serve as positive role models. The program has beenextremely successful with both the young readers and the teens. Teens who take theleadership roles in this volunteer program gain valuable work experience and can takepart in a great community service program as well.Colvin, Sharon. "Story Teens: Putting Teens To Work In The Childrens Room." Voice Of Youth Advocates 33.2 (2010): 130-131. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This great article focused on a Teen-led Story Time program with the Scituate,Massachusetts Public Library. The article shares some fun programming ideas, such aspajamas and story times, as well as practical tween and teen training ideas for story timeimplementation. The article very helpfully by including “Story Teen” program policiesas well as tips for choosing books and tips for running a successful teen-led story time.Fesko, Shari. "Reaching Out Through Outreach: Providing Service To Teen Parents." Voice Of Youth Advocates 33.3 (2010): 227. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This article is a bit different in its focus on teen story time readers. This article focuseson teen parents. The brief article highlights this service at the Evansville VanderburghPublic Library in Evansville, Indiana. Maryann Mori, a teen specialist at the branch,started the program with expecting and new teen parents. She taught them storytellingskills and basic early literacy teaching skills. The article mentions how amazing thedifference in the teen parents’ behavior with their babies was. Many of the teen parentswere struggling readers themselves and the initiative worked toward improving theirown reading skills as well.
  2. 2. Goldsmith, Francisca. "Literacy Daycamp At The Library: Collaborating With Coworkers And Teens." Voice Of Youth Advocates 23.6 (2001): 408- 409. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This article detailed a pretty original summer reading program for children and teens atthe Berkeley Public Library in California. This program is like a literacy day camp andparents can sign their children up for 24 hours of free tutoring over the summer. Theprogram was led by teen tutors and the article mentioned how teens were recruited.Bilingual teens were especially valuable as many of the children were from immigranthomes. The program offered story times, games and snacks as well as academic tutoring.Teen volunteers could gain valuable experience and community service hours whilehelping underprivileged children in the community. The program has been a tremendoussuccess.Lai, Elizabeth. "The Buddy System: Teens And Children Share The Joy Of Reading." Children & Libraries 4.1 (2006): 21-24. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This article focused on a teen-led literacy program that was a little different than most ofthe others I have discovered. This program, implemented by the Toronto Public Library,was not focused on group story times, but on pairings of one teen and one child for readaloud sessions. This occurred over the summer once per week for six weeks. The articlegave the positives and negatives of the program and suggestions for getting the programto run smoothly. It detailed how teen volunteers were selected (through an interviewprocess) and also gave some nice programming ideas for keeping the story time fun forteens and young children.MacMillan, Kathy. "“Kidworks Is Kid-Made”: A Teen Volunteer Program That Wont Quit." Voice Of Youth Advocates 26.4 (2003): 280-281.Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This was a very practical article about the KidWorks program in the Eldersburg Branchof the Carroll County Public Library in Maryland. The article describes the student-ledchildren’s story time program and describes in detail the planning that occurs for theirmonthly story time sessions. The KidWorks program is open to teens and tweens and thegroup meets once per month to plan and once per month to hold the children’s story time.The article describes how successful the program is and how it empowers teens andtweens. It is also a great way to get parents and young children active in the story timesessions. The article even gives a brief outline of how the meetings are run in order togive the reader an idea of how to lead their own KidWorks-style program.Parikh, Neel, and Marcia Schneider. "Book Buddies: Bringing Stories To Hospitalized Children." School Library Journal 35.(1988): 35-39.Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This article was a bit older than the others I read (1988) and it was a bit off topic to teen-led story times, but I include it here because it widened my programming scope a bit and
  3. 3. got me to think a bit broader in my teen-led literacy programming mindset. This articleprofiled a great program from the San Francisco Public Library system called “BookBuddies”. This program recruited volunteers of all ages, including teens all the waythrough the elderly, to read to sick children in the San Francisco Children’s Hospital.What a great idea! The article described the creation of this program as well as theorganizational aspects, including recruitment and training. It talked about the impactthe program had on patients as well as the volunteers and the library system as a whole.The volunteers became Library Ambassadors of sorts and improved the library imagearound the city in a big way.Smith, Alice L. "A Lifeline To Beginning Readers." School Library Journal 36.(1990): 48. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This article presented another great idea for a teen-assisted summer reading program forpublic libraries. Rather than the group story times, these teens were recruited andtrained as “Literacy Lifeguards” for children over the summer. These teens, afterattending the acquired training sessions, staffed the children’s section in the Chappaqua,New York Public Library branch. These teens and tweens were available to read aloud tothe young patrons from 10am – 4pm every weekday over the summer. The program wasa great success and gave a wonderful learning and service opportunity for teens andtweens as well as a great story time session to build early literacy for the young childpatrons.THOMPSON, SARAH BEAN1, teenqueen@gmail.com. "Teens Rise To The Occasion." Public Libraries 52.4 (2012): 28-29. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.This is another article profiling a great teen-led story time program, this time at theSpringfield-Greene County Library in Missouri. The author wrote about how she wassurprised that the teens were so excited about the children’s story time program andabout how they rose to the occasion beautifully. She talked about how the teens impressedthe library staff as well as parents with their enthusiasm and willingness to serve. Shealso mentioned how much the small children enjoyed having the teenagers involved. Thestory time success eventually let to other bigger programming for children led by teens.Tuccillo, Diane P. "Teens Take The Stage." Voice Of Youth Advocates 34.4 (2011): 348-349. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 4 Nov. 2012.This article examines in depth a few exciting youth-led programs at the Poudre RiverPublic Library District in Fort Collins, Colorado. These programs are called LibraryPALS, Theater PALS and Puppet PALS. All three programs are led by teens and tweensand involve storytelling, theater and puppets and encourage literacy among the library’syoungest patrons. The article mentions how inspiring it is to see the teens perform andtake pride in serving young children. The programs teach performance and literacy skillsto teens and they benefit greatly from social interaction with other teens and all ages.
  4. 4. Additional Articles about Teen Volunteering at LibrariesBarban, Leslie. "Building Character And Responsibility: A Decade Of Junior Volunteers." American Libraries 28.(1997): 94-96. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Bernier, Anthony. "Young Adult Volunteering In Public Libraries: Managerial Implications." Library Leadership & Management 23.3 (2009): 133- 139. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Coleman, Yvonne K. "Teen Corps Reaches Out With Pride." Journal Of Youth Services In Libraries 9.(1996): 243-247.Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Dagg, Emily. "Middle School Volunteers With Special Needs At The Denver Public Library." Young Adult Library Services 4.4 (2006): 40-41.Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Farmer, Lesley. "Teen Library Volunteers." Public Libraries 42.3 (2003): 141- 142. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Holden, Susan, and Carol Albano. "“Do You Have A Knack For Storytelling?”." School Library Journal 34.(1987): 50.Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Honnold, RoseMary. "Get Teens Active @ Your Library!." Young Adult Library Services 4.4 (2006): 18-19. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Kendrick-Samuel, Syntychia. "Junior Friends Groups Taking Teen Services To The Next Level." Young Adult Library Services 10.2 (2012): 15- 18. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.King, Danielle. "Tame The Beasts: Try A Little TLC With Your Teens." Florida Libraries 50.1 (2007): 8-9. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.Suellentrop, Tricia. "Step Right Up." School Library Journal 53.12 (2007): 24. Library Literature & Information Science Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 26 Oct. 2012.

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