Deconstructivism

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DECONSTRUCTIVISM

Started in the 1980’s
It views architecture in bits and pieces.
have no visual logic
Buildings may appear to be made up of abstract forms.
More than we say free flow of forms
Ideas were borrowed from the French philosopher, Jacques Derrida.

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Deconstructivism

  1. 1. Deconstructivism by Ar. M. Senthil
  2. 2. Deconstructivism Prepared by Ar. M. Senthil
  3. 3. Deconstructivism Started in1980s “A movement in architecture”
  4. 4. About Deconstructivism: •Started in the 1980’s •It views architecture in bits and pieces. •have no visual logic •Buildings may appear to be made up of abstract forms. •More than we say free flow of forms •Ideas were borrowed from the French philosopher, Jacques Derrida.
  5. 5. DECONSTRUCTIVISM IN ARCHITECTURE  Jacques derrida was a french philospher. He developed the critical theory known as deconstruction and his work has been labeled as poststructuralism and associated with postmodern philosophy.  Deconstruction, which was also called "new modern architecture" in its beginning. It was meant to replace post modern architecture.  The idea was to develop buildings which show how differently from traditional architectural conventions buildings can be built without loosing their utility and still complying with the fundamental laws of physics
  6. 6. Modernism and postmodernism Deconstructivism in contemporary architecture is opposed to the ordered rationality of Modernism and Postmodernism. Robert Venturi's Complexity and Contradiction in architecture , argues against the purity, clarity and simplicity of modernism. With its publication, functionalism and rationalism, the two main branches of modernism, were overturned as paradigms Some Postmodern architects endeavored to reapply ornament even to economical and minimal buildings, described by Venturi as "the decorated shed.“
  7. 7. Contemporary art •Two strains of modern art, minimalisn and cubism , have had an influence on deconstructivism. •A synchronicity of disjoined space is evident in many of the works of Frank Gehry and Bernard Tschumi.
  8. 8. Mark Wigley and Phillip Johnson curated the 1988 Museum of Modern Art exhibition Deconstructivist architecture, which crystallized the movement, and brought fame and notoriety to its key practitioners. The architects presented at the exhibition were Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Coop Himmelblau, Rem Koolhaas, Daniel Libeskind, and Bernard Tschumi.
  9. 9. Libeskind's Imperial War Museum North in Manchester. A prime example of deconstructivist architecture comprising three fragmented, intersecting curved volumes which symbolise the destruction of war. Wexner Center for the Arts Ohio State University North High Street Columbus, Ohio
  10. 10. Walt Disney Concert Hall Los Angeles, California
  11. 11. Guggenheim Museum ,Bilbao. ARCHITECT-FRANK O GEHRY
  12. 12. SEATTLE CENTRAL LIBRARY ARCHITECT-REM KOOLHAAS
  13. 13. JEWISH MUSEUM ,BERLIN GERMANY ARCHITECT –DANAIEL LIBESKIND
  14. 14. Akron Art Museum in Ohio
  15. 15. Performing Arts Centre in Abu Dhabi
  16. 16. Michael Lee-Chin Crystal ,Toronto, Canada
  17. 17. Conclusion We explored a bit of the history of Deconstructivism and the artists and concepts that make up this postmodern art movement. "Deconstructing" is about disturbing the way we think about form and ultimately, it is about the discovery of new relationships.

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