Chris Mills

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Chris Mills

  1. 1. Peace and Justice By Chris Mills
  2. 2. Types of war • Civil war • Conventional warfare • Nuclear warfare • Unconventional warfare What these mean… - Civil war: This is a war where the forces in conflict belong to the same nation or political entity and are fighting for control of that nation or political entity. - Conventional warfare: This is an attempt to reduce an opponent's military capability through open battle. It is a declared war between existing states in which nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons are not used or only see limited deployment in support of conventional military goals and manoeuvres - Nuclear warfare: This is a war in which nuclear weapons are the primary method of forcing the surrender of the other side, as opposed to a supporting tactical or strategic role in a conventional conflict. - Unconventional warfare: This is an attempt to achieve military victory through force, making others surrender, or secret support for one side of an existing conflict using non-traditional means.
  3. 3. Rules of Just War • 1. For defensive purposes only. • 2. Never for personal gain. • 3. ONLY as a last resort and ALL efforts to bring about peace are exhausted. • 4. The innocent must be immune from harm. • 5. War must be as quick and as swift as possible. • 6. Attaining PEACE must be the primary goal.
  4. 4. Pacifism • Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. • Christian pacifism is the theological and ethical position that any form of violence is incompatible with the Christian faith. Christian pacifists state that Jesus himself was a pacifist who taught and practiced pacifism, and that his followers must do likewise.
  5. 5. Why we need punishments • To stop crime and bring justice to the world. • Some people say that capital punishment is sometimes needed to get a point across or stop someone doing something. e.g. If a man murders another man he should be killed as a punishment.

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