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SEMPL 2013
Mythbusters: What do men
and women really want?

Victoria Davies
Distribution Director South-East Europe
Discov...
Searching for answers

2008

2012

2013

2
SPECIES – The changing face of men
2008, Species - 21 countries, 50 experts, 15,000 male respondents.
• Since then we have...
HEADLINES
1.The financial crisis has held up a generation of young men on their road to manhood – and their
frustration is...
HELD UP ON THE ROAD TO MANHOOD
•
•
•
•

The journey to manhood is now more a matter of
financial necessity, particularly f...
FATHERHOOD TAKES CENTER STAGE
•
•
•

More men than ever aspire to fatherhood.

They are now more comfortable with domestic...
UNDER PRESSURE TO KNOW MORE
•

•
•

•

The definition of ‘quality information’ has changed,
with the emphasis now firmly o...
TIME TO TURN OFF?
•

•
•

Men are beginning to cite an ‘unhealthy addiction’
to technology, and an increasingly ambiguous
...
THE RUGGED MAN IN THE MIRROR
•

•
•

Looking attractive continues to be important
for men, especially for those under 30

...
#1 HAPPINESS IS AN ATTITUDE
#2 A PARTNER IN LIFE
#3 BEAUTY INSIDE AND OUT

#4 IT’S WE, NOT ME
#5 SOCIAL STATUS

10
SHE OVERVIEW

Who we spoke to
5,500 women
aged 20-49
in 11 countries

11
12
13
14
15
16
MythBusters - what do men and women really want? (Victoria Davies, Discovery Networks CEEMEA)
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MythBusters - what do men and women really want? (Victoria Davies, Discovery Networks CEEMEA)

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MythBusters - what do men and women really want? (Victoria Davies, Discovery Networks CEEMEA)

  1. 1. SEMPL 2013 Mythbusters: What do men and women really want? Victoria Davies Distribution Director South-East Europe Discovery Networks CEEMEA 1
  2. 2. Searching for answers 2008 2012 2013 2
  3. 3. SPECIES – The changing face of men 2008, Species - 21 countries, 50 experts, 15,000 male respondents. • Since then we have been tracking the opinions and attitudes of men at regular intervals, expanding the age range to 1849s (Species Planning Tool 2009, 2011). • Today, Europe feels like a very different place – economically, politically and socially: our understanding of what it is to be a man today has been shaken up once again. • Species - The Changing Face of Men delves into men’s professional ambitions, personal relationships and the way they spend their free time 2012, Species - 11 countries, 20 experts, 2,250 new interviews 3
  4. 4. HEADLINES 1.The financial crisis has held up a generation of young men on their road to manhood – and their frustration is building. 2.More men than ever aspire to fatherhood. They are now more comfortable with domestic responsibilities and emotional responses. 3.Contrary to popular belief, social media is changing the quantity and quality of men’s friendships for the better. 4.For all its benefits, mobile technology has become an ‘unhealthy addiction’ which leaves some men feeling more like the slave than the master – and surprisingly it’s younger men who feel the most affected and are most keen to switch off. 5.Men are increasingly disaffected with politicians but they are re-engaging with politics, as their belief grows that together with others, they can make a difference. 4
  5. 5. HELD UP ON THE ROAD TO MANHOOD • • • • The journey to manhood is now more a matter of financial necessity, particularly for men in their 20s The economic climate is keeping men in their 20s in education, in their parents’ homes or in low-paid jobs, preventing financial independence Staying at home for longer is placing strain on family relationships; parents struggle to cope with the financial burden The average age at which men first get married has increased from 26 years in 1980 to 30 today. 5
  6. 6. FATHERHOOD TAKES CENTER STAGE • • • More men than ever aspire to fatherhood. They are now more comfortable with domestic responsibilities and emotional responses. The proportion of men under 40 declaring that what they want most in life is to have and raise children increased by 5 points to 45% between 2009 and 2011. 6
  7. 7. UNDER PRESSURE TO KNOW MORE • • • • The definition of ‘quality information’ has changed, with the emphasis now firmly on immediacy and digestibility. The sheer wealth of information available puts pressure on men to know more – or at least enough to save face – and to know it first. Knowledge has become a source of personal validation that affects self-esteem both on and offline. Social media serves as a constant reminder of the knowledge and achievements of others. Two-thirds of men say that they love technology because it enables them to live their life to the full 7
  8. 8. TIME TO TURN OFF? • • • Men are beginning to cite an ‘unhealthy addiction’ to technology, and an increasingly ambiguous relationship in which it can be unclear who is the master and who is the slave. Tech is supposed to make our lives easier, but for some of the men we spoke to, it is starting to do the opposite We might expect men under 30 to be better adjusted to a lifestyle pervaded by mobile technology, but in fact the opposite is true. 8
  9. 9. THE RUGGED MAN IN THE MIRROR • • • Looking attractive continues to be important for men, especially for those under 30 Excessive grooming towards a more rugged, obviously male look; a shift in what ‘attractive’ means? 52% of men agree it’s important to look your best and take care of yourself, up by 4% since 2009 “Men want to be attractive and have attractive jobs up until they’re 50 years old. Even guys who are 25 are caring about not looking old when they’re 35 by buying creams.” Gaute Dreval, Editor-in-Chief Smug Magazine, Norway 9
  10. 10. #1 HAPPINESS IS AN ATTITUDE #2 A PARTNER IN LIFE #3 BEAUTY INSIDE AND OUT #4 IT’S WE, NOT ME #5 SOCIAL STATUS 10
  11. 11. SHE OVERVIEW Who we spoke to 5,500 women aged 20-49 in 11 countries 11
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