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Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Electronic Collection Management

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Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Electronic Collection Management

  1. 1. Qualitative &Quantitative Methods inElectronic CollectionManagement4th International Conference on Qualitativeand Quantitative Methods in LibrariesLimerick, Ireland24 May 2012Selena KillickLibrary Quality Officer
  2. 2. Cranfield University • The UKs only wholly postgraduate university focused on science, technology, engineering and management • One of the UKs top five research intensive universities • Annual turnover £150m • 40% of our students study whilst in employment • We deliver the UK Ministry of Defences largest educational contract
  3. 3. Expenditure onJournals Journal Spend 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
  4. 4. Information Expenditureby Format 2010-11 Books eBooks 4% 4% Databases 24% Journals 68%
  5. 5. Information Expenditureby Format 2010-11 Books eBooks 4% 4% Databases 24% Journals 31% Big Deals 37%
  6. 6. Evaluating the Big Deals:Requirements • Systematic • Sustainable • Internal benchmarking • Elevator pitch • So what? • Enable informed decision making • Demonstrate smart procurement
  7. 7. New Approach Quantitative: Qualitative: • Size • Academic Liaison • Usage • REF Preferred • Coverage • Reading Lists Review • Value for MoneyCONYERS, A., 2007. What do publisher usage statistics tell us? The Analysing Publisher Deal project fromEvidence Base. SCONUL Focus, no.40, pp.72-76, Available at:http://www.sconul.ac.uk/publications/newsletter/40/25.pdf.
  8. 8. Quantitative MetricsIncluding: • Average number of downloads per title • % of titles with zero downloads • Average cost per title • Usage of core titles • Cost per full-text download • Overall • For each core title • Three-year trends for most popular titles • Number of core titles in Top 30 most popular titles
  9. 9. Subscribed Titles • For each core title the cost, downloads, and cost-per- download categorised: • Zero • Low • Medium • High • Cancel?
  10. 10. Considerations • When to measure from/to? • calendar, financial/academic, or contract year? • Which titles make up our core collection? • Do we have access to all of the ‘zero use’ titles? • What constitutes Low/Medium/High? • What about the aggregator usage statistics? • Do we trust the usage statistics? • What is the size of the target population?
  11. 11. Excel Template • Two main data sources: • COUNTER JR1 • Subscription agent financial report • Automated as much as possible • Match formulas working with ISSNs to link title price to usage/holdings • All calculations are completed automatically when the data sources are added • Results fitted onto a one-page printout
  12. 12. QuantitativeReporting • Systematic  • Sustainable  • Internal benchmarking  • Elevator pitch  • So what?  • Enable informed decision making  • Demonstrate smart procurement 
  13. 13. Qualitative Measures:Academic Liaison • Who’s using it? • Why? • How? • Who’s recommending it? • How valuable is it? • What will be the impact if we cancel? • Teaching? • Research?
  14. 14. REF Preferred Journals • Each academic school compiled a list of journals seen as being REF Critical • Lists combined & analysed by Library staff • Number of overlapping titles • Number & cost of titles we do not hold in our collection • Usage of titles we do hold in our collection
  15. 15. Reading List Review Analysis of course reading lists: • What are our academic recommending? • Where is it published? • How often is it recommended?
  16. 16. Quantitative &QualitativeReporting • Systematic  • Sustainable  • Internal benchmarking  • Elevator pitch  • So what?  • Enable informed decision making  • Demonstrate smart procurement 
  17. 17. Using the results.What they can do: • Both qualitative and quantitative measures tell the story of the resource • Aid decision making • Justify procurement • Safeguard budgets…?
  18. 18. What they can’t do:
  19. 19. Closing thoughts • Is it worth investing in this? • Qualitative & Quantitative • Danger of relying on cost-per-download
  20. 20. Looking Ahead • Journal Usage Statistics Portal • New reports = new internal processes • Review of all budgets • All Resources • Systems • Staff • Services • Demonstrating Value and Impact • Resources • Services
  21. 21. References • CONYERS, A., 2010. Usage Statistics and Online Behaviour (2). In: G. STONE, R. ANDERSON and J. FEINSTEIN, eds, The E-Resources Management Handbook – UKSG. Burford: UKSG. Available at: http://uksg.metapress.com/link.asp?id=084t98646x2rn62k • CONYERS, A., 2007. What do publisher usage statistics tell us? The Analysing Publisher Deal project from Evidence Base. SCONUL Focus, no.40, pp.72-76, Available at: http://www.sconul.ac.uk/publications/newsletter/40/25.pdf. • Lib-Stats discussion list and archive: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/LIB- STATS • TAYLOR-ROE, J. and SPENCER, C., 2005. A librarians view of usage metrics: through a glass darkly? Serials: The Journal for the Serials Community, 18(2), pp. 124-131. • Joint Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP): http://jusp.mimas.ac.uk/
  22. 22. Thank YouSelena KillickCranfield Universitys.a.killick@cranfield.ac.ukTel: 01793 785561

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