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Silvana Richardson: Learning Focused Interventions

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Learning Focused Interventions

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Silvana Richardson: Learning Focused Interventions

  1. 1. Learning-focused interventions Silvana Richardson, Bell Eaquals International Conference | Madrid | 11-13 April 2019 #eaquals19madrid
  2. 2. Changes at 1) How we plan teaching and learning 2) How we observe teaching and learning 3) How we conduct teacher research Eaquals International Conference | Madrid | 11-13 April 2019
  3. 3. Planning lessons Discuss with a partner  3 minutes 1. How do teachers typically plan lessons in your school(s)? e.g. Do they write lesson plans? 2. How do teachers plan when their lessons are observed for internal QA purposes and inspections? Can you list the sections of the lesson plan?
  4. 4. Why change?
  5. 5. Planning on a normal day Planning for an observed lesson
  6. 6. 1. Planning Planning of teaching, not of learning Too much detail Overlong Irrelevant information 12 -18 hours writing lesson plans!
  7. 7. 2. Assessment of planning Overemphasis on the lesson plan document Focus on assessment of teaching according to the plan Insufficient focus on the impact of planning on learning Observer time wasted reading unnecessary details
  8. 8. 3. Teaching Covering what’s stated in the plan step by step More risk-averse teaching  less flexible  less responsive to students  no improvisation when pertinent
  9. 9. 4. Observation and feedback Overemphasis on teaching  procedures  techniques  classroom management Insufficient focus on  the impact of teaching on learning  the learners  responsive and emerging teaching
  10. 10. Changes
  11. 11. 1. The Minimalist Lesson Plan Learning-focused Observation 2. Lesson Study
  12. 12. 1. The Minimalist Lesson Plan Learning-focused Observation 2. Lesson Study
  13. 13. Rationale for ‘going minimalistic’ 1. Reducing the pressures on teachers 2. Insights from research into expert teaching 3. Practices adopted by external inspection bodies
  14. 14. Reducing the pressures Over-planning Overwork Added stress DuplicationMuch of the detail could be found elsewhere Inefficient recording Teachers writing what could be observed or discussed via pre-observation chats
  15. 15. Workload Challenge survey, 2014 (sample base = 1,685 respondents) Insights from research: workload
  16. 16. Regarding planning, expert teachers  have mental plans, but do not write lesson plans  are better decision makers  anticipate contingencies dependent on student performance  are more adept at anticipating problems and then improvising  are able to predict what types of errors students might make  rapidly take advantage of new information  are more opportunistic and flexible in their teaching  can be much more responsive to students Hattie and Jaeger (2003) Insights from research – expert planning
  17. 17. Practices adopted by inspection organisations
  18. 18. Practices adopted by inspection organisations New education inspection framework: inspecting the substance of education focuses on the things that matter most. We want to remove any aspects that do not genuinely assess the quality of education, so that time is focused on the things that have the greatest impact on learners’ education.
  19. 19. Aims of the pilot  To make the assessment process less time- consuming and cumbersome for observers  To enable observers to assess planning directly in relation to its impact on learning and learners  To create conditions for teachers to exhibit evidence- informed expert teacher planning behaviours  To enable experienced teachers to plan more efficiently and effectively for quality assurance observations
  20. 20. Pilot 1. Training for academic managers 2. Training for teachers 3. Implementation Ongoing evaluation
  21. 21. Pilot 1. Training for academic managers 2. Training for teachers 3. Implementation Ongoing evaluation
  22. 22. 1. ‘Training’ for academic managers 1. An awareness-raising session  changing the focus of assessment of planning and teaching  changing observation behaviour 2. A remedial standardisation session half-way through the pilot
  23. 23. 2. Training for teachers  Rationale for the change  Exploration of the Minimalist Lesson Plan  Opportunity to practise using it
  24. 24. Comparing lesson plan forms On your own  5 minutes Read the old and the new (‘Minimalist’) lesson plan forms. Compare both forms with reference to the following criteria: 1. Time it might take to complete 2. Amount of required and optional information 3. Relevance of information to the observer 4. Focus on teaching and on learning 5. Flexibility and opportunities for the teacher to respond to emergent learning
  25. 25. Main differences OLD PLAN Learning intentions Differentiation and challenge Objectives (outcomes)1 2 3 Please bear in mind… (O)Class profile 4 If…happens, Imight… (O)Anticipated problems 5 Before and after the lessonTimetable fit 6 Learning episodesStages and approx. timing 7 Procedures and interaction NEW PLAN 8 Aim of stage
  26. 26. Learning intentionsObjectives (outcomes)1  The SMARTer, the better!  What? Identify both linguistic and metacognitive intentions relevant to the topic of the lesson or unit.  How well? Think to what level or standard you want all your students to learn what you’re teaching today (Examples on p 2)  Why?
  27. 27. Giving all the students the right level of challenge High expectations  I will stretch …by…. /I will scaffold …by…  Where relevant, please include Special Educational Needs Differentiation and challenge2
  28. 28. Eliminating duplication of data found elsewhere (e.g. LMS) 3 Please bear in mind… (O)Class profile This can be quickly discussed before the observation
  29. 29. Anticipated problems Narrow focus on fixing issues If … happens, I might… Broader focus e.g. opportunities, questions, possible strategies  An optional box. Feel free to use it if you want to let the observer know what potential problems or opportunities you anticipate and potential strategies to address them, or if you think you might overrun and what you intend to skip or do. 4 If…happens, Imight… (O)Anticipated problems
  30. 30. Timetable fit This can be quickly discussed before the observation Before and after the lesson Helps teachers  contextualise the lesson  identify what to review from the previous lessons  plan what to consolidate after the lesson 5 Before and after the lessonTimetable fit
  31. 31. Approx. timing Reduce the likelihood of teaching the plan rather than the learners Learning episodes Encourage teachers to  focus on what the students will be doing during the lesson  be flexible, responsive and opportunistic  decide how explicit they want to be  Feel free to add or delete boxes as necessary. These are tentative – your idea of what you intend to happen, but may change during the lesson. 6 Learning episodesStages and approx. timing
  32. 32. Procedures Reduce the likelihood of planning only the teaching at the expense of the learning Interaction Can be included in the learning episodes Aim of stage Unnecessary to make this explicit. Not assessing the ability to articulate the thinking underpinning planning decisions, but the ability to plan to promote learning in the observed lesson. 7 Procedures and interaction & 8 Aim of stage
  33. 33. Minimalist Lesson Plan in use – example
  34. 34. Feedback on the MLP Teachers Francoise
  35. 35. Feedback on the MLP Teachers Liz It’s like a snapshot inside what’s going on in an experienced teacher’s head before they go into the classroom.
  36. 36. Feedback on the MLP Observer Rachael
  37. 37. 1. The Minimalist Lesson Plan Learning-focused Observation 2. Lesson Study
  38. 38. 4. Observation and feedback Overemphasis on teaching  procedures  techniques  management Insufficient focus on  the impact of teaching on learning  the learners  responsive and emerging teaching Remember?
  39. 39. Using the MLP Changes in observer focus Assessing the impact of planning on learning Assessing the plan  Watching learners learn Watching teachers teach  Watching the impact of teaching on learning
  40. 40. Changing the focus Changes in observer behaviour Observe = gather evidence of learning Sit near the frontSit at the back Read the learners’ writing Notice students’ reactions to the teacher Read and follow the plan Notice students’language use LookatthestudentsandtheirworkLookattheteacherandtheboard Notice teacher’s language use Talk to the students
  41. 41. If … Why can’t we?
  42. 42. 1. The Minimalist Lesson Plan Learning-focused Observation 2. Lesson Study
  43. 43. Why lesson study?  The natural next step Planning of learning Planning of teaching Assessing the lesson plan and teaching Assessing the impact of planning and teaching on learning Teaching-focused CPD Learning-focused CPD
  44. 44. What’s Lesson Study? A highly specified form of classroom action research focusing on the development of teaching practice knowledge. Prof. Peter Dudley
  45. 45. What’s Lesson Study? PLANNING TEACHING OBSERVING ANALYSINGRECORDING
  46. 46. First cycle FIRST MEETING Teacher group decides what they want to improve RL1 Joint planning of first research lesson RL1 Teach/ observe first research lesson RL1 Interview students RL1 Post- discuss- ion and initial plans for RL2 Second cycle Lesson Study process Third cycle RL2 Joint planning of second research lesson RL2 Teach/ observe second research lesson RL2 Interview students RL2 Post- discuss- ion and initial plans for RL3 RL3 Joint planning of third research lesson RL3 Teach/ observe third research lesson RL3 Interview students RL3 Post- discuss- ion and agree findings Present findings
  47. 47. Lesson Study: focus of the observations  Less on the teacher, more on the learners
  48. 48. Download from https://tinyurl.com/ycxeqnk4 It’s free! The Acid Test!
  49. 49. Design features of effective teacher learning
  50. 50. Lesson study
  51. 51. The research cycles aim to improve students’ learning: the planning and teaching focuses on improving learning, the observations focus on learners’ learning.
  52. 52. The teacher group identifies learners’ needs and plan the research lessons to address them
  53. 53. Prolonged
  54. 54. Involves JPD (Joint PD) Teachers work together to improve an approach
  55. 55. Teachers learn through teaching and observing real classes
  56. 56. Teachers analyse their findings, and use their insights to plan further lessons
  57. 57. Teachers evaluate the impact of using the approach on specific students’ learning
  58. 58. Evaluation (Adapted from Dudley, 2013) • What progress did each case learner make? Was this enough? What about others in the group of learners they typify? • How did the technique being developed help and/or hinder? • What surprises were there? • What aspect(s) of the teaching technique could be adjusted next time to improve the progress of each learner? • So, what should we try next time?
  59. 59. Feedback on the LS A teacher in a LS group Ken Lesson Study helped put the focus solidly on the students’ learning as opposed to our perceived teaching needs. It was interesting and less stressful to carry out research focused on student learning rather than on teaching.
  60. 60. Feedback on the LS A teacher in a LS group Ken A major positive was working closely with fellow-teachers. It was motivating and inspiring. You can learn so much in terms of other ideas and perspectives. We learnt much about focusing on the learner, collaborating as teachers, and taking/incorporating learner feedback.
  61. 61. Want to know more? www.modernenglishteacher.com Volume 28 Issue 2
  62. 62. Over to you
  63. 63. Take-aways? 1. What resonated the most with your context? 2. Is there anything that you would like to consider with a view to trying it out in your organisation? 3. If so, what would be the first steps, and what resources would you need to make it happen?
  64. 64. Any questions? silvana.richardson@bellenglish.com @laioli

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