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The Empowered City:
Design Action Teams
The Design Assistance Model
The difference Civic Leadership makes
• Government is slow
• Constrained by
regulations and codes
and obsolete processes,
...
Started in 2010, rapidly spreading
US, Canada, Australia, Iran (seriously)
Cobble Garden, Ventura, CA
“We don’t need another plan.
They all sit on the shelves. We
need help with implementation
strategies”
–almost every commu...
What can a community do for its
city?
• Articulate a Collective Vision
• Set the table for partnerships
• Position place a...
Mobilize Volunteers
“The Pallet Pavilion is a transitional architecture
project that functions as a community space and
ve...
Create Civic Places
Fifth Ward Community Jam (Houston, TX)
Articulate a vision: Columbia City,
Seattle
Eastlake Neighborhood, Seattle
Transform Difficult Places
Fremont Troll, Seattle
From Ugly to Iconic Public Space
Total Impact over 14 yrs
• 30,000 citizens got involved in neighborhood
plans
• $30+million in private investment catalyze...
The Difference Community Makes
• Broadmoor, New
Orleans, post-Katrina
• Revitalization Plan
• Formed CDC
• Charter School
...
Multi-faceted community approach
• Community powered: 13,000
volunteers have contributed
300,000 hours
• Inclusive: "When ...
Civic Resources: US Examples
• Volunteerism = $171 billion
(only 64 mill people)
• Total Charitable Giving =
$298.42 billi...
Adapt, not adopt
• “What works other
places won’t work here.
We have some unique
circumstances, we
aren’t like other
commu...
Common Obstacles
– Nostalgia
– Inertia
– Conflict
– Institutional sclerosis
– Inclusiveness (lack of)
The Design Assistance Program
• Began in 1967 – inspired by civil rights movement. First
community was a post-flood recove...
“Thanks in part to your superb efforts, we have concrete
proof that group facilitation and group process
methodologies yie...
South Africa-US-UK Connection
Adaptation - Canada
“Community Assist for an Urban Study Effort or CAUSE, is
a program developed by the Ontario Associatio...
Adaptation - UK
“Twenty years ago, I took part in a Community Planning Event in Pittsburgh,
USA which radically changed th...
Framework Principles
• Holistic, Interdisciplinary Approach to Community Design
(Customization)
• Neutral Outsiders (Pro B...
What distinguishes it?
• We are NOT:
– Another Consultant Team
– A process to produce a
planning document
• “Please don’t ...
Project Scope
Quick Examples – Detroit (2008)
Austin – 2012
Rockaways, NYC - 2013
Range of Project Scope – Some
Examples
• SDATs:
– Tampa (downtown)
– LA (downtown)
– Detroit (shrinking city)
– Indianapol...
Project Scope – Dublin
• What are some good project ideas?
• Why? What’s the rationale?
• What are the key issues?
Organizational Structure & Process
Steering Committee
• Which organizations/institutions need to be
involved?
• Which citizen groups/leaders should be
involv...
Team Positions
• What kinds of expertise do we think will need
to be involved for such a project?
Day 1
Welcome/Briefing
Overview
Tour
Lunch
Stakeholder Sessions
Stakeholder Sessions
Team Meeting
Public Workshop
Team Din...
Community Engagement
Creating an Authentic Community
Process
• Location choices
• Goal: Cultural/Civic Event
• Intergenerational = working with...
Civic Branding
Tee-shirts
Food
Interactive Installations
Web & Social Media
Seabrook Island, SC
Media/Press
Windsor, CA students
Context Specific Community
Engagement – Boerne, TX
• Survey
• Website
• Multi-media films
• Flyers
• Banners
• Student Boo...
Boerne, TX
Culturally Relevant
State Planning Award
‘Sugar on Snow’ Event Kickoff –
Newport, VT
Kauai – Baby Lu’au
St. Helens, Oregon
State Good Governance Award
Meeting Location Choices
• Locations that reinforce community identity
and meaning
• Locations that are highly visible
• L...
Englishtown, NJ: Historic Inn
Beatrice, NE: National Homestead
Monument
Location Choices with Visibility
Civic gathering places: Libraries,
schools/town halls/firehalls,etc
Community Engagement Strategy for
Dublin
• What methods can we use to engage the
public about the upcoming process?
• What...
Day 1
Welcome/Briefing
Overview
Tour
Lunch
Stakeholder Sessions
Stakeholder Sessions
Team Meeting
Public Workshop
Team Din...
Components to Think About
• Tour route
• Locations & Meeting Space
• Events
• “Viral” Engagement Activities
• Food
• Cultu...
Day One
Tours
Tours - Waterfronts
Tours - Walking
Site-Specific Stops
Tours - Aerial
Perspectives
Tours – Bus/Van
Stakeholder sessions
Workshops – Meaningful Involvement
Active Group Involvement
Mapping
PA Mapping
Visual displays
Dublin
• What kinds of formats can Dublin apply to
engage citizens in meaningful involvement?
Inclusiveness and Culture
Intergenerational
New Orleans Students
High School Students -Two Examples
from CA
Windsor, CA Primary School students
Morristown-Primary School students
High School Competition
Newport, VT
Food Creates Community Event
How can Dublin make its event
inclusive & intergenerational?
Day Two/Three
Meetings, Studio Work, Follow Up
University Students
Day Four: Final Production
Report & Presentation, Press
Public Officials
Final Presentation
Other Considerations
Working within constraints
Questions?
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Design Action Team Training Workshop, Part 2: The Design Assistance Process

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The dat process model

  1. 1. The Empowered City: Design Action Teams
  2. 2. The Design Assistance Model
  3. 3. The difference Civic Leadership makes • Government is slow • Constrained by regulations and codes and obsolete processes, as well as budgets • Often Work in silos • Not the best convener • People are fast – can turn plans into action TODAY • Constrained only by the limits of their collaboration • Work holistically, integrating strategies
  4. 4. Started in 2010, rapidly spreading US, Canada, Australia, Iran (seriously)
  5. 5. Cobble Garden, Ventura, CA
  6. 6. “We don’t need another plan. They all sit on the shelves. We need help with implementation strategies” –almost every community we work in today
  7. 7. What can a community do for its city? • Articulate a Collective Vision • Set the table for partnerships • Position place as an attractive investment • Mobilize volunteers • Leverage collective capacity & Resources • Build Civic Momentum through community projects, events & activities
  8. 8. Mobilize Volunteers “The Pallet Pavilion is a transitional architecture project that functions as a community space and venue for events. It was built by volunteer power over 6 weeks in late 2012.” (Christchurch, NZ) Pallet Pavilion is built from over 3000 wooden pallets
  9. 9. Create Civic Places Fifth Ward Community Jam (Houston, TX)
  10. 10. Articulate a vision: Columbia City, Seattle
  11. 11. Eastlake Neighborhood, Seattle Transform Difficult Places
  12. 12. Fremont Troll, Seattle
  13. 13. From Ugly to Iconic Public Space
  14. 14. Total Impact over 14 yrs • 30,000 citizens got involved in neighborhood plans • $30+million in private investment catalyzed to help complete over 2,000 citizen-designed projects • $470 million in bonds passed • Forty-Three percent of the city’s adults volunteered regularly in the community and 62 percent participated in at least one neighborhood group
  15. 15. The Difference Community Makes • Broadmoor, New Orleans, post-Katrina • Revitalization Plan • Formed CDC • Charter School • Education Corridor • Formed Improvement District
  16. 16. Multi-faceted community approach • Community powered: 13,000 volunteers have contributed 300,000 hours • Inclusive: "When you have solidarity of people of different economic groups, there's a power to that and that can make a big difference" • Outside help (Harvard, MIT, etc), grants, etc • Attractive partner: "We knew there was money available. We said, 'We're ready, we'll take your money, and we'll show you results.'" (Leveraged $40 million initially) • In 7 years, 85% of the 2,400 homes were rebuilt and occupied, vs. other neighborhoods that languished Gentilly, 2011
  17. 17. Civic Resources: US Examples • Volunteerism = $171 billion (only 64 mill people) • Total Charitable Giving = $298.42 billion. • Non-profits = $300 billion in investment into local communities • Over half of all states have enacted legislation to enable private-sector participation in infrastructure projects, where there is an estimated $180 billion to be leveraged • Crowdfunding - $3 billion in 2012 alone!
  18. 18. Adapt, not adopt • “What works other places won’t work here. We have some unique circumstances, we aren’t like other communities.” • Context is always unique, but issues are mostly the same. (customize process to culture/identity)
  19. 19. Common Obstacles – Nostalgia – Inertia – Conflict – Institutional sclerosis – Inclusiveness (lack of)
  20. 20. The Design Assistance Program • Began in 1967 – inspired by civil rights movement. First community was a post-flood recovery for a downtown. Over 200 communities in US & Canada since. Adapted across the world.
  21. 21. “Thanks in part to your superb efforts, we have concrete proof that group facilitation and group process methodologies yield significant, measurable results” “inspiring”…”exceptional” “A replicable set of values and a process that can be broadly applied to urban design and sustainable communities; and the development of a participatory culture and applied values that explicitly recognize the central place of the public in the design of the built environment.”
  22. 22. South Africa-US-UK Connection
  23. 23. Adaptation - Canada “Community Assist for an Urban Study Effort or CAUSE, is a program developed by the Ontario Association of Architects (OAA) to assist Ontario communities to preserve the quality of life and their environment. Over thirty communities have been studied by CAUSE Teams since the programs inception. Many communities have been re-visited by members of the original CAUSE Team to assess the results of the CAUSE. Almost every community had worked diligently since CAUSE to improve the quality of life for its citizens. Several communities have received awards from the Ontario Association of Architects in recognition of their achievements.”
  24. 24. Adaptation - UK “Twenty years ago, I took part in a Community Planning Event in Pittsburgh, USA which radically changed the way I have practiced as an architect and urbanist since. It was described as an Urban Design Assistance Team and for several days I worked intensively with other professionals and with members of the Pittsburgh community – drawn from all walks of life – devising proposals to improve what was then a very depressed city. Since then, our practice, John Thompson & Partners, has adopted and adapted the key team working and participatory planning techniques that I first discovered in Pittsburgh. We progressed from being community architects involving residents in designing their own homes to community planners, using similar methods, at a neighborhood, town or city scale. ‘Charrettes’ and ‘Community Planning Events’ have become central to our philosophy and we are now applying these techniques on a wide variety of place-making projects throughout Europe and in countries and cultures as diverse as Iceland, Russia and Abu Dhabi.” -John Thompson, Introduction to Community Planning Event Manual
  25. 25. Framework Principles • Holistic, Interdisciplinary Approach to Community Design (Customization) • Neutral Outsiders (Pro Bono Public Service) • COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION (Citizen Experts, Authentic Community Process, meaningful participation)
  26. 26. What distinguishes it? • We are NOT: – Another Consultant Team – A process to produce a planning document • “Please don’t give us another plan. We have plenty – they all sit on the shelves. We need implementation strategies.” – Almost Every community – Government-focused – “Green”-focused – Building-focused • We ARE: – Public Service in the Public Interest • “Consultants work for somebody. Design Assistance Teams work for everybody.” – Action-Oriented – Community-focused – Holistic, Customized • “It’s about the space between the buildings, and the people that inhabit that space”
  27. 27. Project Scope
  28. 28. Quick Examples – Detroit (2008)
  29. 29. Austin – 2012
  30. 30. Rockaways, NYC - 2013
  31. 31. Range of Project Scope – Some Examples • SDATs: – Tampa (downtown) – LA (downtown) – Detroit (shrinking city) – Indianapolis (neighborhood revitalization) – New Orleans (recovery) – Austin (waterfront) • R/UDATs – Birmingham (recovery) – Houston (revitalization) – Miami (Port & river corridor) – New Orleans (corridor) – Rockaways (recovery) – Corpus Christi (Port/Industrial)
  32. 32. Project Scope – Dublin • What are some good project ideas? • Why? What’s the rationale? • What are the key issues?
  33. 33. Organizational Structure & Process
  34. 34. Steering Committee • Which organizations/institutions need to be involved? • Which citizen groups/leaders should be involved? • Which local businesses can be involved? • Which schools/universities? • Which government agencies should be involved? Local officials?
  35. 35. Team Positions • What kinds of expertise do we think will need to be involved for such a project?
  36. 36. Day 1 Welcome/Briefing Overview Tour Lunch Stakeholder Sessions Stakeholder Sessions Team Meeting Public Workshop Team Dinner Team Meeting Follow Up Site Visits Follow Up Meetings Lunch Studio Work (Local Volunteers) Studio Work Team Check-in Day 2 Team Meeting Report Production Graphics Production Lunch Studio Work Team Check-ins Dinner Work Late Team Meeting Report Production Lunch Presentation Design Team Check-ins Public Presentation Celebration Dinner Day 3 Day 4 ARRIVAL WelcomeEvent KickOff DEPARTURE Typical Process Schedule
  37. 37. Community Engagement
  38. 38. Creating an Authentic Community Process • Location choices • Goal: Cultural/Civic Event • Intergenerational = working with schools • Inclusive (languages, methods) • Civic Branding • Invitation Process – Canvassing, Contests, Visibility, Surveys, Flyers • The Welcome • Food • Visibility & Excitement • Public Officials (local, state, national reps)
  39. 39. Civic Branding
  40. 40. Tee-shirts
  41. 41. Food
  42. 42. Interactive Installations
  43. 43. Web & Social Media
  44. 44. Seabrook Island, SC
  45. 45. Media/Press
  46. 46. Windsor, CA students
  47. 47. Context Specific Community Engagement – Boerne, TX • Survey • Website • Multi-media films • Flyers • Banners • Student Book • Press • Utility Mailers • Door Contest • Event kick-off
  48. 48. Boerne, TX Culturally Relevant
  49. 49. State Planning Award
  50. 50. ‘Sugar on Snow’ Event Kickoff – Newport, VT
  51. 51. Kauai – Baby Lu’au
  52. 52. St. Helens, Oregon
  53. 53. State Good Governance Award
  54. 54. Meeting Location Choices • Locations that reinforce community identity and meaning • Locations that are highly visible • Locations that are ‘safe spaces’ for dialogue • Locations that are central to a study area
  55. 55. Englishtown, NJ: Historic Inn
  56. 56. Beatrice, NE: National Homestead Monument
  57. 57. Location Choices with Visibility
  58. 58. Civic gathering places: Libraries, schools/town halls/firehalls,etc
  59. 59. Community Engagement Strategy for Dublin • What methods can we use to engage the public about the upcoming process? • What are the various ways we can communicate about the process? • What are some creative, uniquely local ways? • What meaningful places can host meetings? • What exciting/meaningful activities can create a uniquely local civic/cultural event?
  60. 60. Day 1 Welcome/Briefing Overview Tour Lunch Stakeholder Sessions Stakeholder Sessions Team Meeting Public Workshop Team Dinner Team Meeting Follow Up Site Visits Follow Up Meetings Lunch Studio Work (Local Volunteers) Studio Work Team Check-in Day 2 Team Meeting Report Production Graphics Production Lunch Studio Work Team Check-ins Dinner Work Late Team Meeting Report Production Lunch Presentation Design Team Check-ins Public Presentation Celebration Dinner Day 3 Day 4 ARRIVAL WelcomeEvent KickOff DEPARTURE Typical Process Schedule
  61. 61. Components to Think About • Tour route • Locations & Meeting Space • Events • “Viral” Engagement Activities • Food • Cultural Relevancy • Media/Press • Public Officials • Studio Space requirements
  62. 62. Day One
  63. 63. Tours
  64. 64. Tours - Waterfronts
  65. 65. Tours - Walking
  66. 66. Site-Specific Stops
  67. 67. Tours - Aerial
  68. 68. Perspectives
  69. 69. Tours – Bus/Van
  70. 70. Stakeholder sessions
  71. 71. Workshops – Meaningful Involvement
  72. 72. Active Group Involvement
  73. 73. Mapping
  74. 74. PA Mapping
  75. 75. Visual displays
  76. 76. Dublin • What kinds of formats can Dublin apply to engage citizens in meaningful involvement?
  77. 77. Inclusiveness and Culture
  78. 78. Intergenerational
  79. 79. New Orleans Students
  80. 80. High School Students -Two Examples from CA
  81. 81. Windsor, CA Primary School students
  82. 82. Morristown-Primary School students
  83. 83. High School Competition Newport, VT
  84. 84. Food Creates Community Event
  85. 85. How can Dublin make its event inclusive & intergenerational?
  86. 86. Day Two/Three
  87. 87. Meetings, Studio Work, Follow Up
  88. 88. University Students
  89. 89. Day Four: Final Production Report & Presentation, Press
  90. 90. Public Officials
  91. 91. Final Presentation
  92. 92. Other Considerations
  93. 93. Working within constraints
  94. 94. Questions?

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